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September 2016D. Hicks and Coauthors Receive the Ziman Award for their Leiden Manifesto/Research Metrics

Our colleague, Diana Hicks (SPP) and her coauthors have received the 2016 Ziman Award from the European Association for the Study of Science and Technology for their Leiden Manifesto for Research Metrics.
Hurrah, Diana and team !

Bibliometrics: The Leiden Manifesto for research metrics
Use these ten principles to guide research evaluation, urge Diana Hicks, Paul Wouters and colleagues.
NATURE.COM




IAC Writing Group - for Fall Semester

Dear IAC Friends,

Our colleague, Carol Senf (LMC) has organized a successful IAC writing group - and has space for additional faculty this fall. If you would like to work with a group committed to successful publication of articles and/or books, please send a message to Carol Senf (carol.senf@lmc.gatech).

With good wishes! -Mary



August 2016Welcome to the Fall Semester- IAC ADVANCE!

Dear IAC Friends,

Welcome to the upcoming Fall semester !

And welcome to our new IAC women faculty members:
-Anjali Bohlken, Nunn School of International Affairs
-Kate Pride Brown, School of History and Sociology
-Sherie Randolph, School of History and Sociology
-Anna Westerstahl Stenport, School of Modern Languages
-Rachel Whitlark, Nunn School of International Affairs

Our IAC ADVANCE website profiles women faculty - and supports networks of communication, information, and exchange. Your updated profiles are nearly complete. Please stay tuned for the link to the updated site, as well as plans for an IAC ADVANCE Lunch/Discussion.

If you are interested in an IAC writing group this semester, please send a message on this.

Your participation in IAC ADVANCE embodies our shared goals of equity, diversity, and excellence !



International Workshop "Feminist Politics of Knowledge in Times of Globalisation"

Call for Papers

Feminist Politics of Knowledge in Times of Globalisation:
Epistemologies, Strategies and Conditions

International Workshop
of the Chair of Sociology/Social Inequality and Gender

Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany), 01–02 December 2016


Contemporary societies are frequently described as ‘knowledge societies‘ where all kinds of knowledge are supposed to play an important role for the social, economic and political development under the conditions of globalisation. The system of knowledge production and dissemination as well as knowledge itself becomes more and more important for these societies. However, reflections about the ongoing changes and its influences on knowledge rarely pay attention to social and epistemic inequalities in knowledge production and dissemination.

This observation marks the starting point for the international workshop which will focus on feminist politics of knowledge in times of transnationalisation and globalisation. The term ‘politics of knowledge’ highlights the fact that knowledge, its production, dissemination and use, is always political. Due to its roots in and connections to the women’s movements, this is especially true for feminist knowledge: There is a long tradition of discussion about the epistemological status and methodological modes of feminist knowledge but also about questions of inclusion in and exclusion from feminist knowledge production and dissemination. There are also ongoing discussions on how feminist knowledge is used or misused for societal, economic and political purposes.

For the workshop, we welcome both theoretical as well as empirical submissions, in particular those concerning the following questions:
How does feminist knowledge production reflect the epistemological and methodological challenges of transnational and postcolonial developments? What about social and epistemic inequalities in this process? And how can concepts like intersectionality and/or queer be integrated in contemporary feminist epistemologies and methodologies?
What is the scientific, but also the societal meaning of feminist knowledge? What happens to feminist knowledge under conditions of societal, economic or political use, e.g. is it strengthened, weakened or translated, and if so, how and why? Is there a mobilisation of feminist knowledge for social development, and if so, why? Who are the mobilising people, groups and/or institutions? What are the societal arenas where feminist knowledge is used?
How do the current material conditions of feminist knowledge production and dissemination suffer or profit from the neoliberalisation of universities and new academic governance all over the world? Where are alternative sites for feminist knowledge production and dissemination emerging and how do they look like?

Both junior and senior academics are invited to submit an abstract (between 500 and 800 words on the topic, objectives and research questions plus, if applicable, the empirical background of the paper) in form of a word- or pdf-document. Abstracts should also include FULL contact details, including your name, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. Abstracts should be sent until September 30th, 2016 to Heike Kahlert (conference-sozsug@rub.de or http://www.sowi.rub.de/sozsug/index.html.en). Deadline for notice of acceptance/rejection of the paper is October 15h, 2016.

Note: We apologise for the fact that no funding, fee waiver, travel or other bursaries can be offered for attending the workshop!



July 2016Congratulations, Anne and Roberta !

Dear IAC Friends,

Our colleagues, Roberta Berry (PubPolicy) and Anne Pollock (LMC) have been selected to participate in the 2016-17 Emerging Leaders Program, sponsored by the Office of the Provost, with the Institute for Leadership and Entrepreneurship and the Office of Graduate Education and Faculty Development.

Congratulations, Anne and Roberta !

With good wishes - Mary



June 2016Call for Papers: Mobilizing the University - Curriculum, Access, and Solidarity

CALL FOR PAPERS

Deadline for submission is August 15, 2016
Mobilizing the University: Curriculum, Access, and Solidarity
[working title]
Editor, Julie Shayne, PhD ~ jshayne@uw.edu
Assistant Editor, Namita Paul ~ pauln4@uw.edu
University of Washington Bothell

This interdisciplinary, edited collection focuses on the relationship between social justice activism and the university. Using an intersectional feminist framework we seek to explore three main themes. First, how has grassroots activism impacted what we teach and learn in the university? For example, what is the relationship between feminist movements and the birth of gender, women, and sexuality studies or racial justice movements and ethnic studies? Put another way, how do marginalized histories become part of the mainstream college curriculum? Next, how does social justice activism impact who has access to the university? For example, what sorts of movements exist that have pushed to create welcoming spaces for undocumented students, students with disabilities, or queer students? Finally, we seek to explore the role of campus solidarity activism in off campus movements. For example, historical cases might include student movements for divestment from Apartheid South Africa or campus sanctuary movements to denounce the US intervention in Central America.
While providing a theoretically and empirically original case study of an historical or contemporary social justice movement, contributors will be asked to address several topics in your essays: 1) Your own social location and why activism matters to you; 2) how does intersectional feminist analyses and methodology influence your research agenda? and 3) what do you see as the future for grassroots activism and university collaboration? Or, what lessons can be learned from the history you have shared?

We seek essays documenting historical and contemporary social justice activism, broadly construed, representing movements from around the world, particularly the global South. We envision activism conveyed through cultural productions, embodied protests, intellectual projects, among other forms of articulation. Additionally, we are particularly eager to receive essays by scholars/activists/artists of color in the humanities, social sciences, and arts.
One section of the book will be dedicated to student essays based on students’ own activism. This section will feature first-person narratives by undergraduate and recently graduated baccalaureate student activists. We are especially enthusiastic to include stories and experiences of students of color, queer students, particularly transgender and, students with disabilities. We are interested in essays that will give an overview of the movement that you, as a student activist are a part of, explaining how your participation in the movement informs your learning. In addition, we would like you to share your experiences as an activist within the academy, be it successes, failures or, merely tensions inherent in activist-academic equations.
Box 358530 18115 Campus Way NE Bothell, WA 98011-8246
425.352.5350 fax 425.352.5335 www.uwb.edu/IAS

Currently we have student essays about Students Against Sweatshops, disability access, and undocumented student activism. We are looking to expand with topics such as students’ personal experiences with ethnic or gender, women, and sexuality studies programs, anti-racist activism, Black Lives Matter, transnational solidarity movements, prison reform activism, feminism, and gender justice, to name a few.

Directions and guidelines for case study chapters: Chapters must be double-spaced, between 9,000-10,000 words (not including notes or bibliography.) Please save your essay as a word document titled with the following naming convention: CaseStudyEssay_Title_Author last.first names_Date
Directions and guidelines for student essays: Interested authors are advised to consult a faculty mentor for feedback and guidance before submission. Please include name and contact information of the advising professor with your submission. Essays must be double-spaced, and between 1,300-1,800 words. Please save your essay as a word document titled with the following naming convention: Student essay_Title_Author last.first names_Date
All authors: Please do not submit previously published material. Please email essays, an abridged CV (no more than 2 pages), your cell phone number, and a short bio to Editor Julie Shayne at jshayne@uw.edu and Assistant Editor Namita Paul at pauln4@uw.edu.
Deadline for submission is August 15, 2016

QUESTIONS? No question is too small or too big. Please contact Julie Shayne (jshayne@uw.edu) and Namita Paul (pauln4@uw.edu) with any inquiry.

About Julie Shayne, Editor: Julie Shayne is a Senior Lecturer and Faculty Coordinator of Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies in the School Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences at the University of Washington Bothell. She is author/editor of three books: Taking Risks: Feminist Activism and Research in the Americas (editor) (SUNY, 2014 & 2015), They Used to Call Us Witches: Chilean Exiles, Culture, and Feminism (Lexington, 2009), and The Revolution Question: Feminisms in El Salvador, Chile, and Cuba (Rutgers, 2004).

About Namita Paul, Assistant Editor: Namita Paul is a second year student in the Masters of Arts in Cultural Studies (MACS) program at University of Washington Bothell. She is an interdisciplinary visual artist and a budding scholar-artist with aspirations to continue researching her interests in feminist explorations of the progression of globalization and its impact on women’s lives, labor, and politics, well beyond MACS.


That time of year: Research Proposals !


IAC Friends,

It is that time of year - launching research proposals !

The National Academy of Sciences' Guidelines are worth the read (brief) !

with good wishes - Mary

GUIDELINES FOR PREPARING THE RESEARCH PROPOSAL
A key element of your application is the Research Proposal. The proposal reflects your thinking and design of an original research project. It should be innovative, technically sound, compatible with the research interests of the government agency and laboratory to which you are applying, and feasible to complete in a 1-3 year period of time. The outcome of the proposed research should be new information that can be published in the peer reviewed literature and that will further knowledge in your field.

When preparing your proposal, include the following key elements:

Statement of the problem
Write a clear and concise statement describing the subject area of your research and what you hope to accomplish.

Background and relevance to previous work
Briefly review the literature as it pertains to your stated problem. Describe how previous work, by you and/or others, has led to the research that you propose to perform. Discuss any technological developments that have contributed to the state of knowledge that will allow you to conduct this research.

General methodology
Provide sufficient detail of your plan of work so that knowledgeable reviewers can evaluate whether the work you plan is technically sound. Whenever possible, refer to published methods. Include methods that will be used to interpret or evaluate results (e.g. statistical methods). If the proposed research involves the use of animal or human subjects, a statistical discussion of the number of animals (or human subjects) relative to the validity of the results should be included

New or unusual methods
If your research will include new methods or methods that are not likely to be generally known in the discipline, provide additional detail that documents feasibility of these methods in the context of your proposed research.

Expected results, significance, and application
Describe what results you hope to obtain, including any contingencies that might apply if unexpected results are obtained or methodologies fail. Describe the significance of these results and how they might be used in practical application to problems of interest to the agency to which you are applying. If your proposed research does not have obvious practical applications in the short term, explain how the work will further knowledge in the field that will eventually lead to practical application.




May 2016Congratulations, Marilyn !

IAC Friends,

Our colleague, Marilyn Brown (PubPolicy) has a new book just published: Benjamin Sovacool, Marilyn Brown, and Scott Valentine, Fact and Fiction in Global Energy Policy, Johns Hopkins University Press (2016).

Congratulations, Marilyn - and all good wishes !
-Mary



March 2016Diana Hicks & Principles of Measurement of Research Performance

Leiden Manifesto for Research Metrics
Research evaluation has become routine and often relies on metrics. But it is increasingly driven by data and not by expert judgment.
To support researchers and managers, five experts led by Diana Hicks, professor in the School of Public Policy at Georgia Institute of Technology, and Paul Wouters, director of the Center for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS) at Leiden University, have proposed 10 principles for the measurement of research performance: the Leiden Manifesto for Research Metrics. Published as commentary in Nature in July 2015, the principles are being circulated around the world. A video summarizing the principles is available and it has been published in the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts as Leading Edge Digital Publications Series
Vimeo video here.

Bibliometrics: The Leiden Manifesto for research metrics


February 2016Adaptive Leadership Workshops - Sponsored by ADVANCE - Apply 15 Feb

Dear IAC Friends,

Upcoming is a set of Adaptive Leadership Workshops for Faculty, sponsored by ADVANCE. The Workshops occur in four sessions - and also have a component of Leadership Development Groups (with four persons) between sessions. These Workshops are valuable toward managing research projects, exercising leadership in professional fields, improving outcomes in educational or other initiatives, and creating centers and programs.

Attached is the full description for the Workshops - and the link for applying:
https://forms.isye.gatech.edu/ltp-apply
Attached also are statements from those who have participated in these Workshops. Applications are due 15 Feb 2016 - and involve submitting a 1-page statement of a leadership challenge and committing to attend each of the four sessions and participate in the Leadership Challenge Group between sessions. Participation is free of charge and underwritten by ADVANCE.

With good wishes - Mary


January 2016The IAC Leading Edge Digital Publications Series

The Leading Edge Digital Publications Series
Georgia Tech Liberal Arts at Work in the World


Inspired in 2013 by the 125th anniversary of LiberalArts@Tech, the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts made our first steps toward launching a digital publications series, The Leading Edge.

Our mission
To showcase the innovative research that we do at Georgia Tech at the intersections of the humanities, social sciences, and technology by sharing in digital format designated examples of some of our most robust, innovative, and cutting edge projects.

Priorities
Robust displays of human-centered perspectives on societal challenges.
Innovative examples of our dynamic frameworks for understanding the contexts, patterns, impacts, and consequences of innovation, research, and policy.
Projects that highlight innovative models and paradigms for problem-posing, developing integrative analyses, and finding sustainable solutions.
Initiatives that cast light on local challenges and opportunities and connect them over time and space to regional and global contexts.
Projects that demonstrate our logistical expertise in bringing multiple stakeholders together to engage and address common interests and concerns.
Explorations that suggest new frontiers for liberal arts research and education.
Goal
To blaze pathways for excellence in the liberal arts, establishing this knowledge set (humanities, social sciences, technology), expertise, and experience base as critical assets for our highly scientific and technological 21st century world.

Publications
Humanistic Perspectives in a Technological World
Africa Atlanta 2014 Publications


HERS Women's Institute (training for women as academic administrators)

The HERS Institutes (training for women as academic administrators) are offered at three locations and in two residential formats.
HERS Wellesley Institute: Core curriculum delivered in cumulative, multi-weekend sessions held throughout the academic year; traditionally in October, November, and March
HERS Bryn Mawr Summer Institute: Core curriculum delivered in a concentrated, 12-day campus residency format; traditionally held in June or July
HERS Denver Summer Institute: Core curriculum delivered in a concentrated, 12-day campus residency format; traditionally held in June or July

More information is at:

http://hersnet.org/institutes/what-are-the-institutes/

With good wishes - Mary


Dean Royster Named One of Top Five Women Role Models/Atlanta

Atlanta 5×5 Profile: Jacqueline Jones Royster
Dean Jacqueline J. Royster was recently named one of the top five women role models in Atlanta. “For me, I’m a problem finder/problem solver type person who likes to do interesting stuff. I like to invoke that critical, creative imagination. My response [to Georgia Tech] was I would like to see that happen,” she said in the profile. Read full profile on Women@TheFrontier.

- See more at: http://www.iac.gatech.edu/news-events/stories/486941#sthash.lHhB0OHw.dpuf


Congratulations, Bettina !

IAC Friends,

Congratulations -and all good wishes- go to Betttina Cothran (ML) on the recent grant of The Halle Foundation to support scholarships for students in the School of Modern Languages to study abroad in Germany. Bettina directs the program.


With our many regards, -Mary


Congratulations, Kaye !

Dear IAC Friends,

Congratulations - and all good wishes- to Kaye Husbands Fealing (chair, School of Public Policy) on her recent appointments at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: 1) the Committee on Developing Indicators for Undergraduate STEM Education, and 2) the Panel on Reengineering the Census Bureau's Annual Economic Surveys.

With our many regards, -Mary


Incredible Kodachromes !

IAC Friends,

This link (below) goes to an *incredible* set of kodachromes - including women in industry during the 1940s.

Thank you to Valerie Thomas for sending these !

with regards, -Mary

Mary - I thought you might enjoy scanning through these photographs. I was fascinated by the ones of women in engineering and manufacturing. - Valerie

https://pavelkosenko.wordpress.com/2012/03/28/4x5-kodachromes/



December 2015Features on: Dean Jackie Royster

Dear IAC Friends,
Dean Jackie Royster appears in two featured articles in Women@The Frontier:
-Reader, Writer, Talker: http://www.womenatthefrontier.org/jacqueline-jones-royster-2/
-3 Steps to Rising: http://www.womenatthefrontier.org/jacqueline-jones-royster/
These articles inspire !
With good wishes - Mary


November 2015Lena Astin, 1932-2015

Lena Astin, co-founder of Center for Study of Women (CSW) and influential feminist scholar, has passed away at the age of 83.

We are sad to report that Helen (Lena) S. Astin, co-founder of the UCLA-CSW and influential feminist scholar, passed away on October 27. She was a Distinguished Professor Emerita of Higher Education at UCLA and widely known for her scholarly activism and research concerning education and career development of women, leadership, and spirituality.

Born in Serres, Greece, in 1932, her early interest in science and math was discouraged because of their association with male careers. The alternative, teacher’s college, however, proved transformative for her and her professional trajectory. Upon graduation, she moved to the United States in 1951 to pursue her newly developed interest in psychology—which eventually brought her to Ohio University in Athens, OH, where she earned a Master’s in Psychology, and then to University of Maryland when she earned a PhD. She was the second woman to earn a PhD in psychology at the school and being such a rarity within her graduate program heightened her awareness of educational sexism and inspired her professional interest in studying women in higher education: “…that’s when I saw sexism really,” she recalled later. “the first time I encountered it. And I didn’t understand it…So you can see that in those days, there were not many women, which prompted me later on to study women with doctorates” (UCLA Oral History Program).

After marrying fellow graduate student, Alexander Astin, Lena worked with the Commission on Human Resources and Higher Education as part of the National Academy of Science starting in the 1960s. There, she investigated talent development and the utilization of women in the workforce and gained much recognition in conjunction with the women’s sociopolitical movement in the United States. Driven in part by her personal experience trying to make a career in a field dominated by men, her early scholarly work focused on equity for women. Her book, The Woman Doctorate in America (Russell Sage Foundation, 1969), was published just as second-wave feminism was burgeoning. Deflating some myths about highly educated women, it also documented widespread sex discrimination in higher education. In 1970, she was asked to chair the American Psychological Association’s (APA) Task Force on the Status of Women in Psychology. Her work helped to pinpoint the deficiencies in psychological research with regard to women. The Task Force recommended that APA create a division that would be devoted to researching and promoting the psychology of women. In 1973 Division 35 was created.

In 1973 Alexander and Helen were both offered professorships at UCLA. During her 29-year affiliation with UCLA, she served as the Associate Provost of the College of Letters and Science at UCLA from 1983 to 1987 and served as the founding director for the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA. Her books have made a lasting contribution to scholarship on women, education, and equity: They include Some Action of Her Own: The Adult Woman and Higher Education (Lexington, 1976) and Sex Discrimination in Career Counseling and Education (Praeger, 1977). Astin’s 1991 book, Women of Influence, Women of Vision (co-authored with Carole Leland; Jossey-Bass, 1991), was an in-depth study of 77 prominent women leaders who had helped to bring about societal change on behalf of women. “A book for students, for teachers, for scholars,” noted Ann W. Richards, former governor of Texas, “and for any woman who wants to know how the struggles of individual women came to create what is collectively known in this country as the women's movement.”

In the mid-1980s, she worked with Nancy Henley, Anne Peplau, Kathryn Sklar, and Karen Rowe, on a proposal that led to creation of the UCLA Center for the Study of Women in 1984. She served on the Advisory Committee and when Karen Rowe stepped down as Director, Lena stepped up and served as Acting Co-Director with Julia Wrigley in 1990-91 and then as Acting Director until Kate Norberg was appointed in 1992. Under her leadership, CSW convened several influential conferences, including the first graduate student research conference (what became Thinking Gender), What Ever Happened to Women's Liberation: Rethinking the Origins of Contemporary Feminism, Women and Work: Understanding the Gender, and Women, Work and Power in the Middle East.

On the occasion of CSW’s 25th anniversary, Lena extolled its success and its continued value: “CSW has been a ‘gem’ in our midst. Established to support and celebrate the research of academic women and for women, it has played a transformative role for feminist scholarship at UCLA. It has supported and continues to do so many generations of feminist scholars. Particularly heartwarming is that it has been critical to the work of young scholars and graduate students.” We are all grateful for her role in its creation and continued existence at UCLA. In recent years, Lena had grown more interested in the role of spirituality in improving the lives of college students. The results of a long-term study were published in Cultivating the Spirit: How College Can Enhance Students' Inner Lives (Jossey-Bass/Wiley, 2010). CSW hosted an event, Students and Spirituality, where Lena shared her research and the book’s recommendations.

In 2012, as part of the oral history component of CSW’s Women’s Social Movement Activities in Los Angeles project, Lena was interviewed by former CSW staffer Kimberlee Granholm. The audio materials and transcripts are available on the UCLA Library’s Oral History website:
http://oralhistory.library.ucla.edu/viewItem.do?ark=21198/zz002c2fkm&title=Interview%20of%20Helen%20Astin
As a result of that interview, Lena went on to write an autobiography, titled The Road from Serres: A Feminist Odyssey, which was published by Marcovaldo Productions in 2014.

All who knew her will cherish the memory of Lena's warmth and kindness. All of us benefit from her unflagging commitment to gaining equity for women.


October 2015More news: Congratulations, Kyoko and Angela !

IAC Friends,

Our colleagues, Kyoko Masuda (ModLang) and Angela Labarca (ModLang), have a new book, co-edited with Carlee Arnett: Cognitive Linguistics and Sociocultural Theory, Mouton de Gruyter, 2015.

Congratulations, Kyoko and Angela !

With all good wishes - Mary



Congratulations, Jenna !

Dear IAC Friends,

Our colleague, Jenna Jordan (INTA) is a principal investigator with Mike Salome (INTA) for an award ($485,000.) from the Carnegie Foundation to the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs. The study focuses on how break-through technologies are increasing nuclear instability, worldwide.

Congratulations, Jenna !

with all good wishes - Mary



Congratulations, Marilyn !

IAC Friends,

Our colleague, Marilyn Brown (PubPol) has a new book, with Yu Wang, just published: Green Savings: How Policies and Markets Drive Energy Efficiency (Praeger Press, 2015). Her book addresses energy resource planning, emerging technologies and methods for evaluating them, and policy making.

Congratulations, Marilyn !

With all good wishes - Mary


Please See: The Brave and Bold website

IAC Friends,

Please see the Brave and Bold website - and consider registering support
for a one word change in the Rambling Wreck theme song that uses "join"
rather than "cheer" GT in reference to women.

The link is at:
http://www.jointhebraveandbold.gatech.edu/

With regards, -Mary

-All GT Deans have supported this as well.


Congratulations, Usha !

IAC Friends,

Our colleague, Usha Nair-Reichert (Econ) has received a Fulbright specialist award for collaboration on trade, multinational investments, and innovation at the Warsaw School of Economics, Poland.

Congratulations, Usha !

with good wishes - Mary



September 2015IAC Advance Network/Website

Dear IAC Friends,

Thank you for your updated profiles for the IAC Advance Network/Web for Women Faculty !

Please see our newly updated site at: http://www.advanceiac.gatech.edu/index.php

The site profiles IAC women faculty, by School (See: People page: http://www.advanceiac.gatech.edu/people.php ); and contains news, a calendar, and search function. The site helps support communication and collaboration among faculty, as well as among students and faculty (including prospective students and faculty) -- and is designed to feature/publicize our terrific IAC women faculty !

Thanks go to undergraduate partner, Sarah Bartel, for her valued work with me on this site.

with thanks and regards,
-Mary



IAC ADVANCE - and Writing Groups

Dear IAC Friends,

The IAC Writing Groups --organized and underway with your initiation/support of them at an IAC ADVANCE Lunch-- are flourishing. Each of the (3) groups, organized in June, met four to five times over the summer - and continue into the fall. Facilitators of these writing groups are: Rebecca Burnett (LMC); Kristie Macrakis (HSOC - and at Wilson Center, 2015/16) and Carol Senf (LMC); and Bob Kirkman (PubPolicy). If you would like to join a writing group, Carol Senf may still have room in her group. If you would like to constitute a new group, I will get materials to you.

with good wishes - Mary



Active Service/Modified Duties for Family Commitments

Dear IAC Friends,

The Georgia Tech Active Service/Modified Duties Program -developed with support of Advance- has benefited numbers of faculty members toward modified workload and flexible schedule for a period because of family commitments.

The Program is administered by the GT Office of Faculty Affairs: http://faculty.gatech.edu/faculty-affairs-reps/internal-resources/active-service

Please let me know if you may want to discuss (confidentially) any of these issues.

with good wishes - Mary


August 2015Welcome to fall semester- IAC ADVANCE!

Dear IAC Friends,

Welcome to the upcoming Fall semester !

And welcome to our new IAC women faculty members:
-Neha Kumar (International Affairs)
-Laine Nooney (Literature, Media, and Communication

Our IAC ADVANCE website profiles women faculty - and supports networks of communication, information, and exchange. Your updated profiles are nearly complete - stay tuned for the link to the updated site as well as plans for an IAC ADVANCE Lunch/Discussion !

The IAC Writing Groups, organized and underway with your initiation/support of them at an IAC ADVANCE Lunch, are flourishing. Each of the (3) groups, organized in June, met four to five times over the summer - and continue into the fall. Facilitators of these writing groups are: Rebecca Burnett (LMC); Kristie Macrakis (HSOC - and at Wilson Center, 2015/16) and Carol Senf (LMC); and Bob Kirkman (PubPolicy). Please contact them on participation for fall - or if you are interested in organizing an additional group, I will get materials to you.

Your continuing participation in IAC ADVANCE embodies our shared goals of equity, diversity, and excellence !

with good wishes, -Mary


WST Student-Faculty Research Partnerships

Women, Science, & Technology (WST)
Student-Faculty Research Partnerships


WST continues the very successful initiative supporting GT faculty research partnerships with undergraduate students in research on gender, science, and technology, providing hourly funding for undergraduate research assistants. This is GT's first --inaugural-- undergraduate student-faculty research program.

In this way, WST continues to engage students and faculty in active and cooperative learning outside as well as inside the classroom.

If you are interested in undertaking a WST student-faculty partnership during Fall 2015 semester, please send an application as soon as possible with the following information to

(1) Name of student -- and student's major area of study, email, and phone; and whether student has previously worked at GT (which is for accounting purposes)
(2) Faculty supervisor
(3) Description of the project for partnership on gender, science, and technology
(4) Proposed number of hours a week for student in partnership (10-15/wk is usual)
(5) Proposed period for the partnership (that is, months during Fall 2015)
(6) Proposed rate of pay ($10.00 - 12.00/hr. - depending upon the experience of the student)



July 2015WFRN Early Career Work and Family Fellowships

Early Career Work and Family Fellowships - Call for Applications
The Work and Family Researchers Network (WFRN) is seeking applicants for 2016 Early Career Work and Family Fellowships. The goal of the program is to help promising young scholars establish career successes, as well as connect them to the WFRN community. Fifteen scholars will be selected for the program.

Fellows receive a one-year membership in the WFRN, conference registration, and $500 to help defer expenses to attend the 2016 WFRN Conference (to be held June 23-25, 2016 in Washington, D.C.). At the conference, special events will be targeted to serve the interests of fellows, including networking opportunities with senior scholars and teaching/research workshops. In addition, fellows will be connected with one another in periodic encounters beyond the conference, intended to facilitate collaboration and peer-mentorship.

To be eligible, candidates must have received their doctorate in 2013 or later and have yet to progress into tenured or secure senior-level positions. Eligibility is not restricted on the basis of national location. Information about the program and application materials can be found here.

The deadline for receipt of applications is September 15, 2015. Questions about the program can be addressed to Stephen Sweet, the program director, at ssweet@ithaca.edu.




June 2015Research Proposals: Broader Implications Section

Toward the upcoming dates for research proposals:

Strongly substantive recommendations on the Broader Implications Section (and relationship to Intellectual Merits).

With good wishes ! -Mary

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>From the Grant Writers Application Workbook
Writing the Broader Impacts Section of Your Research Proposal

The stand-alone Broader Impacts (BI) section, which is a major cause of angst for many applicants, isn't really that hard to write - provided that you understand what the National Science Foundation is trying to accomplish through this part of the application. Put simply, NSF wants every dollar it invests in basic research and education to have social, as well as scientific, consequences. That kind of social awareness distinguishes NSF and has always impressed us.

It is also necessary that you understand that BI activities must evolve from what is proposed for research. In other words, they cannot be completely independent of the research. Rather, they have to grow naturally out of the proposed investigations, either directly or indirectly (see Merit Review Principle #2, below). That is why we recommend that you write the BI section after you have completed all of the other, research parts of the Project Description.

You should plan for this section to occupy one-to-two of the fifteen pages that are allowed for the Project Description of a standard grant application. While it is essential that meaningful Broader Impacts activities be proposed, they cannot be of such a scale that they would interfere with your ability to conduct the research that is proposed elsewhere in the Project Description.

NSF is serious about what is proposed here - to the extent that, if the BI section isn't comparable in strength and quality to the application's Intellectual Merit side, it is highly unlikely that your proposal will be funded, even if it were to receive a perfect score for Intellectual Merit.

MERIT REVIEW PRINCIPLES, REVIEW CONSIDERATONS AND DESIRED SOCIETAL OUTCOMES IN THE CONTEXT OF BROADER IMPACTS

Merit review principles, merit review considerations used in evaluation, and desired societal outcomes have been detailed in Chapter 6. However, they are sufficiently informative of what needs to be written here that they bear repeating - but now in the context of Broader Impacts. [In what follows, we have inserted illustrative modifying words in brackets.]

Merit Review Principles:

1. "All NSF projects [including Broader Impacts] should be of the highest quality and have the potential to advance, if not transform, the frontiers of knowledge."

This Principle tells you that your Broader Impacts activities must be distinguished and they have to have the potential to produce positive societal impact of a kind that is relevant to NSF. Offering activities that are either predictable, "canned", or that appear to be tacked on to what is obviously a pure research proposal could, and probably would, put your entire application at risk.

2. "NSF projects, in the aggregate, should contribute more broadly to achieving societal goals. These broader impacts may be accomplished through the research itself, through activities that are directly related to specific research projects, or through activities that are supported by, but are complementary to, the project. The [Broader Impacts] project activities may be based on previously established and/or innovative methods and approaches, but in either case must be well justified."

The second Principle mandates that, overall, the results obtained from your project must include more than the knowledge that will be derived from the research. There have to be societally important outcomes, as well. The current NSF mandate that your Broader Impacts activities must grow directly or indirectly from the proposed research comes from this Principle. In addition, Principle #2 decrees that what is proposed must be justified, i.e., the BI activities have to meet a need that is relevant to NSF.

3. "Meaningful assessment and evaluation of NSF-funded [Broader Impacts] projects should be based on appropriate metrics, keeping in mind the likely correlation between the effect of broader impacts and the resources provided to implement projects. If the size of the activity is limited, evaluation of that activity, in isolation, is not likely to be meaningful. Thus, assessing the effectiveness of these activities may best be done at a higher, more aggregated, level than the individual project."

The third and final Principle suggests that, even though NSF does not require evaluation of all BI activities (http://www.nsf.gov/bfa/dias/policy/merit_review/mrfaqs.jsp#8) you will likely be well served by offering an evaluation plan for your BI activities (see discussion of distinguishing approaches later in this Chapter). Do they work and, if not, how can they be improved? The third Principle also implies that you have to invest sufficient resources in this part of the application if you want it to succeed. With respect to success, when the National Science Board assessed that aspect of past BI activities, they were surprised to find that applicants often didn't follow through with what they had proposed. That finding is one of the things that led NSF to change, effective January 14, 2013, how Broader Impacts activities should be proposed and evaluated. It is also what has led to the following sentence in the Grant Proposal Guide: "With respect to the third principle, even if assessment of Broader Impacts outcomes for particular projects is done at an aggregated level, PIs are expected to be accountable for carrying out the activities described in the funded project." (emphasis ours). Even though applicants have always been accountable for what they would propose, the last phrase in that sentence puts everyone on notice that NSF will now be enforcing what they haven't enforced very well in the past. So, don't propose anything under Broader Impacts that you can't/won't be able to deliver.

Merit Review Considerations for Broader Impacts:

1. "What is the potential for the proposed [Broader Impacts] activity to benefit society or advance desired societal outcomes?"

This consideration doesn't need any additional elaboration, in our opinion.

2. "To what extent do the proposed [Broader Impacts] activities suggest and explore creative, original, or potentially transformative concepts?"

As stated earlier, under Principle #1, the BI activities that you propose can't be predictable, "canned", or appear to be tacked on. They need to be genuinely creative and original. That translates into your need to do the same kind of literature review for your Broader Impacts section that you would instinctively do for your research-related sections. Most applicants don't do such a review. If you do, it will prevent you from proposing things that have already been tried/done by others. In addition, it will almost surely help to spark in you new Broader Impacts ideas/approaches. If you are going to claim transformative potential for what you propose, that's terrific, as long as you can credibly defend that assertion, i.e., that implementation of your Broader Impacts idea(s) will literally revolutionize the area of your focus. To that point, NSF defines transformative research as that which "involves ideas, discoveries, or tools that radically change our understanding of an important existing scientific or engineering concept or educational practice or leads to the creation of a new paradigm or field of science, engineering, or education. Such research challenges current understanding or provides pathways to new frontiers." (http://www.nsf. gov/about/transformative_research/definition.jsp) Most applicants who ascribe transformative potential to their BI activities are caught out by reviewers, who consider their claim to be overreaching. Be careful not to make that mistake.

3. "Is the plan for carrying out the proposed [Broader Impacts] activities well-reasoned, well-organized, and based on a sound rationale? Does the plan incorporate a mechanism to assess success?"

Most of this consideration doesn't require elaboration. The second sentence should be regarded as another, unequivocal indicator that an evaluation plan in your BI section would likely be well received.

4. "How well qualified is the individual/team/organization to conduct the proposed [Broader Impacts] activities?"

Everything that you propose under Broader Impacts must be within your/your team's capabilities. If unpaid outside services are required to make the project feasible, be sure to accompany your application with a letter or letters of collaboration that commit expertise to the project that, otherwise, would be missing. To be credible, paid-for services need to be included in your Budget. For example, a fee-for-service consultant may be needed to ensure that evaluation of your Broader Impacts (and Intellectual Merit) activities is fully objective.

5. "Are there adequate resources available to the PI (either at the home organization or through collaborations) to carry out the proposed [Broader Impacts] activities?"

This consideration should be seen as a follow on from Merit Review Principle #3. Resources often are not thought about in the context of BI activities. They are just as important to this part of the application as they are to the parts that pertain to research. For example, many Broader Impacts projects require access to resources/subjects that are not under the control of the applicant. In such a circumstance, reviewers will want to see a letter or letters of collaboration that confirm your access.

Societal Outcomes Desired by NSF (from most to least specific):

1. Full STEM participation of women, persons with disabilities and underrepresented minorities;

2. Improved STEM education and educator development at any educational level;

3. Development of a diverse, globally competitive STEM workforce;

4. Enhanced [STEM] infrastructure for research and education;

5. Increased public scientific literacy and public engagement with [STEM] science/technology;

6. Increased partnerships between academia, industry and others;

7. Improved national security;

8. Increased economic competitiveness; and

9. Improved well being of individuals in society.

It isn't necessary, in our view, to go over each of the desired societal outcomes that is listed, above; the meaning of most of them is readily apparent. For your project to be credible, you should choose a specific subdivision of one of these desired-societal outcomes, especially if it is one of those that is general in nature. The examples that we will provide at the end of this Chapter will clarify what we mean by, "choose a specific subdivision".

APPROACHES THAT WILL HELP TO DISTINGUISH YOUR BROADER IMPACTS SECTION

All applicants include a description of their proposed Broader Impacts activities - and so should you. But if that's all you provide, not only will your BI section be deficient, it won't stand out from others. Here are things that you can include that will set your application's BI section apart.

Focus on a Problem that is Important to NSF

Ideally, you want what you propose for BI activities to help solve a problem that is relevant to NSF - i.e., one that the agency cares about. Relevant problem areas are reflected by the list of desired-societal outcomes listed, above. Note that the first three, and probably the fourth and fifth, of the categories listed above are STEM related. They are the easiest to target, in our opinion. Numbers six through nine are increasingly general in nature. As noted earlier, if you were to choose one of the latter as the basis for your BI activities, you would need to clarify what specific subdivision under the general area would be targeted, e.g., "sensors" under "Improve national security."

Include an Evaluation Plan

As noted earlier, in our opinion, an evaluation plan will help your project to stand out in a positive way. For that reason, we recommend that you include such a plan. Both formative (process) and summative (outcomes) evaluation should be proposed. If you have never created such a plan before, this is not the time to propose what you "think" is adequate. If you, like most applicants, have no formal training in how to write and implement an evaluation plan, read The 2010 User-Friendly Handbook for Project Evaluation (http://informalscience.org/images/research/ TheUserFriendlyGuide.pdf), which is published by NSF. You can easily read it in an hour or two. Doing so will ensure that you write a highly convincing evaluation plan. For example, one of the things that you will learn is that you need to engage an outside evaluator. Having an objective, disinterested person perform the evaluation is essential to the plan's credibility. Proposing you or someone else from your project as the evaluator is akin to having a fox guarding the chicken coop.

If you know during development of your proposal who the evaluator will be, we strongly recommend that you involve him/her in the creation of your evaluation plan.

Many institutions offer evaluation resources - e.g., a fee-for-service group of experienced evaluators who are available to help plan and implement evaluation strategies. If that is the case at your institution, include such an individual in your Budget as a consultant, but only if s/he will be paid from the grant. If the proposed evaluator is a member of your larger campus community and, therefore, would be unable (or unwilling) to accept payment, include him/her as a "human resource" in the Facilities, Equipment and Other Resources section (see Chapter 18 of this Workbook). Including such a person in the Budget or Budget Justification would constitute voluntary committed cost sharing, which is prohibited by NSF.

If the evaluator will be paid from the grant, a letter of collaboration from him/her should not be included with the proposal; the fact that paid effort appears in the Budget is sufficient. If the evaluator will not be paid from the grant, s/he should provide a letter of collaboration. It should be nothing more than that: agreement to serve as the evaluator (see Chapter 19 in this Workbook). A mistake that is commonly made is to include the evaluation plan in the letter of collaboration, which would likely be interpreted as an attempt to circumvent the page limitation on the Project Description.

Finally, because credible evaluation is a requirement for both the research and Broader Impacts parts of your application, we strongly recommend that you ask someone who is a skilled evaluator to serve as a member of your Pre-Submission Review Committee (see Chapter 20).

Include a Dissemination Plan

As noted above, BI activities cannot be of a scale that they interfere with completion of the proposed research. So, how do you propose a small BI project and still have a viable claim for positive societal impact? The answer to that question is a dissemination plan that amplifies the positive impact of your small-scale project. We strongly recommend that such a dissemination plan be presented as part of your Broader Impacts section.

For example, if your BI project requires implementation of activities at local high schools, you shouldn't propose to do so at all eight such institutions that are within a 30-mile driving radius of your university. Doing so would represent nearly a full-time commitment, which is counter to the concept of Broader Impacts. Rather, the appropriate approach, in our opinion, would be to propose your BI activities at two or three of the schools, in conjunction with a strong evaluation plan. You would then disseminate what works on that small scale. For example, you might recruit colleagues at other institutions to help you test your findings elsewhere. They would provide letters of collaboration that would accompany your proposal. Such an approach offers the potential for amplification of the results of your relatively small-scale project and increases, therefore, the likelihood that they will have positive impact.




Professional Development Opportunities for Faculty

Dear IAC Friends,

In an IAC Advance project, I developed a listing of professional development opportunities for faculty.
We can consult these on the IAC Resources Page for Faculty: http://www.iac.gatech.edu/faculty-and-staff/resources

with good wishes - Mary

EXAMPLES OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR FACULTY

1. American Association of University Women Resources

Resources are available for developing leadership skills among women – including webinars and on-line forums: http://www.aauw.org/

2. American Council on Education (ACE) Fellowship Program

This program “enables participants to immense themselves in the culture, politics, and decision making process of another institution.” Opportunities are available to participate in multi-day sessions, develop a network of higher education leaders, and take on special projects and assignments under the mentoring of experienced leaders.

Applications are due in Fall of the year preceding potential participation:
http://www.acenet.edu/leadership/programs/Pages/ACE-Fellows-Program.aspx

3. Higher Education Resource Services (HERS) Leadership Institutes

HERS provides professional development for women in higher education administration. The Summer Institute, a partnership between HERS and Bryn Mawr College and the University of Denver, is a two-week residential professional development program. The curriculum allows participants to gains skills and perspectives for academic administration, and to build a national network for continuing information and exchange.

Applicants must have the support (financial and otherwise) of the dean or chief executive officer of their home institution:
http://hersnet.org/institutes/what-are-the-institutes/


4. Georgia Tech Institute on Leadership and Entrepreneurship (ILE)

ILE builds a network of campus leaders through an IMPACT speaker series and leadership roundtables among Georgia Tech faculty and staff that build tools and techniques for effective leadership. http://www.ile.gatech.edu/about/

5. Jefferson Science Fellows

The Jefferson Science Fellows Program is open to tenured faculty who are US citizens, and is administered by the National Academies, and partnerships between US academic science and the US Department of State and US Agency for International Cooperation. The program provides opportunities to travel to US embassies and missions abroad, and following the fellowship year, remain available as an experienced consultant on short-term projects.

The application period opens each Fall and closes in mid-January:
http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/Jefferson/index.htm

6. University System of Georgia (USG) Executive Leadership

The Executive Leadership Institute is a comprehensive 120-hour development program, over an eight (8) month period of required participation. The aim is to enhance leadership skills for potential high-level, administrative advancement within the University System of Georgia, through components including group learning, independent study, teleconferences, and action learning.

To be eligible, a participant needs to be employed in higher education for a minimum of three years, have positive evaluation ratings, demonstrated leadership competency, a minimum of a master’s degree, and a current title of Vice President, Chair, Dean or Executive Director (or equivalent). http://www.usg.edu/leadership_excellence/executive_leadership_institute




May 2015Congratulations, Ann!

Dear IAC Friends,

Our colleague, Anne Pollock (LMC) has received a Lavender Award, honoring faculty and staff members who have made Georgia Tech a safer and more inclusive environment for LGBTQIA (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and asexual) students, faculty, staff, and alumni.

Congratulations, Anne - and all good wishes !

-Mary


Congratulations, Kristie!

Dear IAC Friends,

Our colleague, Kristie Macrakis (HTS) has been awarded a fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, DC for the upcoming academic year. She will be doing research on technology and the rise of the US Security State.

Congratulations, Kristie - and all good wishes !

-Mary


IAC Writing Groups

Dear IAC Friends,

We have followed-up on your interest in writing groups with the survey to which response was strong !

For June, planned is an opening lunch-meeting at which we will have tables with conveners and those interested in a writing group to get underway in summer (these can also continue into the academic year, however may be preferred).

We will keep you posted on this - and an open message will go out on the IAC list on the day/time of this lunch-meeting.

With thanks and regards, -Mary


April 2015WST Student-Faculty Research Partnerships

Women, Science, & Technology (WST)
Undergraduate Student-Faculty Research Partnerships

WST continues the very successful initiative supporting GT faculty research partnerships with undergraduate students in research on gender, science, and technology, providing hourly funding for undergraduate research assistants. This is GT's first --inaugural-- undergraduate student-faculty research program.

In this way, WST continues to engage students and faculty in active and cooperative learning outside as well as inside the classroom.

If you are interested in undertaking a WST student-faculty partnership for some/or all of upcoming period of May 1 - June 30, 2015, please send an application with the following information to

(1) Name of student -- and student's major area of study, email, and phone; and whether student has previously worked at GT (which is for accounting purposes)
(2) Faculty supervisor
(3) Description of the project for partnership
(4) Proposed number of hours a week for student in partnership (10-15/wk is usual)
(5) Proposed period for the partnership (that is, some or all of the months of May - June 2015)
(6) Proposed rate of pay ($10.00 - 12.00/hr. - depending upon the experience of the student)



Writing Groups- Your Interests

So that we may better understand Ivan Allen College (IAC) faculty members’ interests in participating in IAC groups that provide feed-back and support on writing for publication, we would like to know more about your preferences. Please answer the questions in this short survey (taking one or two minutes).
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/G9QYF2N
Ivan Allen College Writing Groups: Survey of Interests

With thanks,

Jacqueline Jones Royster
Dean, Ivan Allen College


February 2015Academic Pathways and Passages

Dear IAC Friends,

Appreciation goes to you in sharing multiple journeys through academic pathways and passages in today's IAC ADVANCE Lunch Discussion. Thanks to panelists Susan Cozzens, Narin Hassan, and Katja Weber, to Dean Jackie Royster, and to all for sharing experiences and ways-sand-means for successful academic pathways.

Your commitment and community in shared goals of equity, diversity, and inclusion are at-core of the ADVANCE initiative !

With thanks and regards - Mary


January 2015ELATE Program- for developing women leaders in higher education

Deans and ADVANCE Professors,

My attention has recently been drawn to the ELATE program at Drexel University, a program for developing women leaders in STEM fields in higher education. The deadline for applications has recently been extended to February 5.

Here is the link: http://www.drexel.edu/engineering/programs/special-programs/ELATE/

There are several alumna in the Atlanta area who could describe their experiences with the program, including the graduate dean at Emory, Lisa Tedesco, the person who recommended it to me. The program director, Diane Magrane, would be glad to put our faculty in touch with other local contacts.

Please pass the information along to anyone you think might benefit.

Susan


December 2014Congratulations, Kristie

Dear IAC Friends,

Kristie Macrakis' new book, Prisoners, Lovers, and Spies, has been named one of Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2014 for Non-Fiction.

Congratulations and all good wishes, Kristie !

-Mary



High-achieving men and women described differently in reviews

IAC Friends,

Consider the findings in this article (below): In performance reviews
in technology companies, "constructive feedback" for men addressed areas of skills, while for women, the focus was on personality (e.g., "watch your tone"). Interesting implications.
The abrasiveness trap: High-achieving men and women are described differently in reviews
http://fortune.com/2014/08/26/performance-review-gender-bias/

With good wishes - Mary



November 2014Berlin Wall: 9 November 1989

IAC Friends,

Today is the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin wall on 9 November 1989 -- marking the end of the cold war, and a new era in modern German, and world, history. Google commemorates: https://www.google.com

With good wishes - Mary



October 2014 Qi Wang's new book on Independent Chinese Cinema


Qi Wang's (LMC) new book has just been published: Memory, Subjectivity and Independent Chinese Cinema (Edinburgh University Press, 2014).

Our congratulations and good wishes go to Qi !


September 2014Arizona Methods Workshops

From Erin Leahey (Univ of Arizona)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Please join us for the 5th Annual Arizona Methods Workshops!
January 8-10, 2015
These 3-day workshops are open to everyone and are hosted by the School of Sociology at the University of Arizona, where all workshops are held. The goal is to share the methodological expertise of our school and college with the wider community of social scientists. The workshop topics and instructors vary from year to year; this year we are offering four workshops, including:

~ Qualitative Data Analysis in ATLAS.ti
~ Data Management and Programming in Stata
~ Managing Academic Pressure
~ Introduction to Comparative Participant Observation
~ Getting Funded for Qualitative and Mixed-Methods Research
~ Causal Inference in the Social Sciences – Potential Outcomes Analysis
~ Qualitative Comparative Analysis

Faculty and graduate students have found these seminars to be helpful in prior years. We hope you will join us this year. Please note that students receive a 50% discount on their registration. Plus, you could tack on a few days to enjoy a January vacation in sunny Tucson!

Details, registration, and links to housing:
http://sociology.arizona.edu/methods

Please direct questions to:
SBS-methods@email.arizona.edu



Atlanta Conference on Sci & Innovation Policy


Dear Colleague,

Registration for the Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy starts May 1. Make your plans to attend the 5th Biennial Meeting, on Sept. 26-28, 2013, at Georgia Tech in Atlanta.

Thanks to everyone who submitted paper, session and poster proposals. Your participation will ensure that the conference showcases the highest-quality scholarship addressing the multidimensional challenges and interrelated characteristics of science and innovation policy and processes.

Please note that we are no longer taking abstract submissions. Authors of accepted abstracts will be notified individually by the end of April.

Four Atlanta hotels are offering special conference rates and are booking rooms now. Learn more about the hotels and rates on our website, and secure your room your room today!

As you make plans to attend the Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy, we invite you to arrive a day earlier to attend the 3rd Global TechMining Conference on Sept. 25. This is an exciting opportunity to maximize your trip to Atlanta by attending two conferences the same week. Click here for more information about the Global TechMining Conference, sponsored by the VP Institute, in conjunction with Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy.

If you have questions, don't hesitate to contact us. We look forward to seeing you soon in Atlanta!

Best Regards,

Diana Hicks & Julia Melkers
Conference Co-Chairs
2013 Atlanta Conference on Science and Innovation Policy
Georgia Tech School of Public Policy


Active Service - Modified Duties

Dear IAC Friends,

The Georgia Tech Active Service - Modified Duties Program enables a faculty member to devise a wokload schedule to remain an active member of the faculty, but with a modified workload, for the birth or adoption of a child or the severe illness of a parent, spouse, or child.

Please see this link for information on the program and procedures in applying:
http://www.iac.gatech.edu/files/wysiwyg/file/GT%20Active%20Service%20Modified%20Duties%202012.pdf

with good wishes - Mary


Small Scale Research: What are the Prospects and Pitfalls?

Small scale research has prospects and pitfalls - this piece helps sort these out.
with good wishes - Mary

From: Chapter 2 - Designing and writing about research: developing a critical frame of mind, by Louise Poulson and Mike Wallace, in the book, Learning to Read Critically in Educational Leadership and Management, edited by Mike Wallace and Louise Poulson. SAGE Publications, Ltd. 1 Oliver's Yard, 55 City Road, London EC1Y 1SP http://www.sagepub.com/books.nav. Copyright © 2003 by Sage Publications, Inc.

Making the Most of Small-Scale Research

While much small-scale research is undertaken for dissertations and theses, many experienced professional researchers periodically engage in studies of similar scope. Sometimes their purpose is to explore a new idea or topic to find out whether it is feasible for a research enquiry, or to pilot a particular approach or instrument prior to undertaking a larger study. At other times small-scale research might be part of a major investigation, as where a case study is conducted of a specific aspect of the wider phenomenon being explored. Large studies often combine different components, each of which may vary widely in scope. The research reports in Part 2 offer examples of such small-scale research and also individual components of larger studies, some of which are more ambitious than you could realistically attempt for a dissertation or thesis. However, while the context in which such studies were done may be different from that of an individual completing a research investigation for a dissertation or thesis, many principles and procedures are similar. In the physical and natural sciences, doctoral theses may be written about an aspect of a much larger study when students work with their supervisor as part of a team in a laboratory. But in the humanities and the social sciences it is more likely that as a student you will work alone, perhaps researching a problem or an issue arising from your professional context.

A key question for all small-scale researchers is: how much is it possible to achieve in work of modest scope? Even if small in scale, a tightly focused study that is well designed and executed can contribute to the delineation of an issue or problem in the field of enquiry. It may open up a new avenue for investigation, illuminate and exemplify a substantive topic already identified within the field, or approach a familiar substantive issue from a different theoretical perspective. Less commonly, it might even develop a new methodological approach to a topic.

For a dissertation or thesis, one of the first things to do is to clarify the focus and define the parameters of the research. In short, you should identify your intellectual project: consider what you will concentrate on, and what is practicable for a lone researcher with limited resources and a tight time-scale. A challenge facing you is to design a study that is both practicable and of sufficient scope and significance to yield worthwhile data. Be wary of pre-judging what you will find (see Chapter 7).

Someone may be interested in an example of national policy change and how it impacts on practice in organizations affected. Obviously, a wide-ranging empirical investigation of the national context of policy implementation in a representative sample of organizations would be beyond the scope of most individual dissertations or theses. But an individual researcher could reasonably undertake a clearly delineated study of implementation in a locality, or even a single institution within a bounded time-scale. While the scope of such a study might be limited, if it were carefully thought out and conceptualized, it would still have the potential to make a contribution to understanding of the phenomenon. To do so, it would have to be narrowly focused, with a clear specification of what was being undertaken and an explanation of how it would be done. The specific problem or topic being studied would have to be linked to the wider context of the field of enquiry, indicating why it was a significant problem to study. In the example above, this linkage might be to the wider policy context, and perhaps to changing notions of practice in the organizations to implement change.

A further means of strengthening the significance of a small-scale study is by making clear links between the work being conducted and existing literature in the field and, if appropriate, related fields. These links can be made in relation to three aspects of your enquiry (paralleling the focus for an academic literature review outlined in Chapter 1):

1. the substantive focus of the study - the particular topic or issue that constitutes the substance of the investigation within a field of enquiry;

2. the theoretical issues - how particular concepts, or theoretical perspectives, may guide and inform the study, and what the strengths and limitations of such perspectives are;

3. methodological approaches - in a particular field a methodology might be accepted as standard practice. You may use this approach in your study, or turn to a different methodology, perhaps by attempting to gain in-depth knowledge of a phenomenon in a particular context.

If the investigation makes strong substantive, theoretical and methodological connections with other studies within the field, its potential value will be enhanced. In relation to a dissertation or thesis, you might ask:

* How is my study similar to other work in substance, theory or methodology?

* In what ways does it build upon or extend previous work and is there other research that confirms the direction of my findings?

* What does my study do that has not been done before?

It is important to remember that small-scale research need not always generate its own data. The collection of primary data direct from the subjects of your research is often the most time-consuming, expensive and difficult part of an investigation. There are numerous statistical databases and other archive materials now accessible through the internet which could be used as the basis for study (see Chapter 4). Gorard (2001) exemplifies how he undertook a piece of small-scale research using secondary data: statistical information that had already been collected and was easily available through the internet from government sources. He explains that he started by questioning the assertion made in research literature that schools in Wales did not perform as well as their counterparts in England. He then set out to test this assertion by using existing statistical data to reanalyze the comparative results of equivalent schools in both countries. Gorard outlines how using secondary data sources enabled him to tackle and important topic that would have been impossible had he attempted to collect the data himself:

The findings of this simple value-added analysis run contrary to the schooled for failure hypothesis (about schools in Welsh LEAs). They defended children, teachers and schools in Wales, and met with considerable local media and some political interest.... The complete study, including data collection, transcription and analysis took me one afternoon at an additional cost of less than £10 for photocopying and access to census figures. I would have been very happy to conduct this study for my masters' dissertation instead of traipsing round schools conducting yet another survey (which is what I actually did). I would have saved time, money and produced interesting results for my discussion section. (Gorard, 2001: 48)

Note that Gorard had a clearly focused idea for a study. It let to the formulation of a clearly specified hypothesis, firmly grounded within existing research literature. He then tested this hypothesis, not by attempting to collect new evidence himself, but by careful analysis of existing data. The outcome was an example of small-scale research that had wider significance and impact. It also showed how a key to successful small-scale research is achieving a balance between a tightly focused topic embodying a practicable design and making connections with the wider context in which the problem has arisen.

What makes for a high-quality final written account of a small-scale study? Here are the top ten components we, as critical readers, would look for:

1. a clearly-focused substantive topic, with the focus sustained throughout, incorporating a well-defined broad central question leading to detailed research questions or hypotheses;

2. a critical review of literature in the field, and clear connections drawn between existing knowledge and the small-scale study (in terms of the substantive topic, theories and concepts, and methodology);

3. an appropriate methodological approach and detailed methods for answering the research questions or testing the hypotheses;

4. a well-structured and explicit design for the study whose methods are fit for their purpose;

5. data that is analyzed thoroughly, with the processes of data preparation, summary and analysis clearly set out;

6. discussion of the analysis or findings that relates back to the original research questions or hypotheses, and to the critical review of the literature;

7. a reflective summary of what the study has achieved, its strengths and weaknesses, any problematic issues that arose, and any implications for future research (and policy or practice if appropriate);

8. accurate referencing, both in the text and in the references list, so that, in principle, any reference may be followed-up;

9. clear expression with attention to writing style, punctuation, spelling and grammar, so that the account may be easily understood; and

10.the development of a logical argument from the title to the end of the account, providing as much backing as possible for the claims being made.

Make the most of your small-scale research by bearing these components in mind, together with the principles of self-critical writing outlined in Table 1.1 in the previous chapter, when planning the structure and presentation of your dissertation or thesis. It is also advisable to refer from the outset to the statement of criteria used in assessing your work that is likely to be included in the students' handbook for the programme. Ensure that your written account meets each of these criteria.

Box 2.1 Ten pitfalls to be avoided in a small-scale study
1. Too diffuse a focus for the study or attempting to collect too much data to analyze.

2. A descriptive or uncritical review of the literature ('X said this; Y said that').

3. Lack of linkage between the research questions and the review of literature.

4. No connection made between the research questions and the methodology and detailed methods of data collection chosen for the study.

5. Failure to make explicit how the study was designed: its time-scale, how the research subjects or sites sampled were chosen, how research instruments were designed and tested, or how the data were analyzed.

6. Data not analyzed in sufficient detail or depth to provide an answer to the research questions.

7. Inadequate description or explanation of what the data showed.

8. Lack of discussion of the findings and their significance, how they answered the research questions, tested the research hypotheses, or illuminated the issues studied.

9. Weak conclusions, and failure to return to the original questions or hypotheses and say what the study has achieved, what problems were encountered, and what issues arose from the work.

10. Over-ambitious or over-generalized recommendations for policy or practice that are not backed by evidence from the study.

References

Gorard, S. (2001) Quantitative Methods in Educational Research. London: Continuum.

Miles, M. and Huberman, M. (1994) Qualitative Data Analysis. New York: Sage.


Most Gender Balanced Computing Program in US: Joint Computing and LMC

Dear IAC Friends,

Georgia Tech's joint program in Computational Media - a joint BS degree between Computing and the School of Literature, Media, and Communications of IAC - is the most gender-balanced computing program in the US !

See the story at: http://computinged.wordpress.com/2014/09/02/the-most-gender-balanced-computing-program-in-the-usa/

With good wishes - Mary



For a Winning Research Proposal

Tips for a Winning Research Proposal

The posting below gives 15 great tips on writing winning research proposals. It is by Mark Matthews, editor of Prism, and is from the September 2014 issue of Prism, the magazine of the American Society for Engineering Education. [www.asee.org] 1818 N Street, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036-2479. ©Copyright 2013. All rights reserved. Reprinted with permission.

Regards,

Rick Reis


Tips for a Winning Research Proposal

Experts suggest ways to gain favor with funding agencies.

The numbers look scary. Of the 48,999 research proposals it received in fiscal year 2013, the National Science Foundation funded just 10,829, or 22 percent. At the National Institutes of Health, the "success rate" was less than 17 percent. For new faculty members making their first try as a principal investigator (PI), things were more intimidating. At NSF, 17 percent of these proposals got funded; at NIH, fewer than 10 percent. The rates are unlikely to improve much in the near future, with government research funding essentially flat. But strip away the one-third of proposals rejected because they don't meet basic requirements like deadlines and add to that the ones so badly composed as to insult reviewers, and the picture starts to look brighter. "If you do your job before you submit, things aren't so bleak," says Susan Kemnitzer, deputy director of NSF's Electrical Communications and Cyber Systems Division in the Engineering Directorate.

George Hazelrigg, deputy director of the Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation Division of the Engineering Directorate, contends that "fully half the proposals submitted" flagrantly fail to adhere to criteria that are nothing more than common sense. He's the author of a four-page primer, Twelve Steps to a Winning Research Proposal. Randolph Moses, associate dean of engineering for research at Ohio State University and chair of ASEE's Engineering Research Council, says well-written, compliant proposals stand a good chance of rejection the first time they're submitted but tend to fare much better the second or third time around - provided the researcher corrects shortcomings found by program directors and reviewers.

Here, then, are some pointers drawn from Hazelrigg; presentations by Kemnitzer and Moses at the 2014 ASEE conference; an enduring 2002 guide to seeking an NSF CAREER grant by Richard Felder, emeritus professor of chemical engineering at North Carolina State University; and other information from government research agencies.

1. Do some prep work to find the appropriate program for your project. Understand the agency's research priorities and goals, and figure out what it considers a good proposal. "Get inside the head of the agency," advises Kemnitzer, whose role includes serving as acting deputy director of the Chemical, Environmental, Biological, and Transport Systems Division. NSF's Engineering Directorate, for instance, is currently interested in interdisciplinary, cross-cutting themes, like the nexus of food, water, and fuel. Nanotechnology, Big Data, and sustainability remain hot topics. Conference materials published by the Engineering Research Council offer insight into the engineering research needs of a number of science agencies, including those within the Energy Department and military services.

2. If an agency expects a research proposal to contain an educational component - as is the case with NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) proposals - make it substantive. According to Felder, "The most common mistake I've seen is discounting the importance of the education part." This need not mean designing a whole new project; researchers can partner with education specialists. Beyond intellectual merit, NSF requires proposals to show a "broader impact," which can include education. Too often, submissions are cursory - "drive-by broader impacts," NSF Assistant Director for Engineering Pramod Khargonekar calls them.

3. Learn who your competitors are by studying recent research awards in your field. Read up on what's already been done and by whom. "Remember that research builds on the extant knowledge base," says Hazelrigg.

4. If you want to pursue research that doesn't fit a particular request for proposals (RFP), send an email to a program manager to find out if he or she is interested. Do this as well before submitting a CAREER proposal. "NSF program officers expect it. You will find them extremely helpful," Felder writes.

5. If you're responding to a program announcement or RFP, read it carefully to grasp exactly what it seeks. "If your research doesn't fit easily within the scope of topic areas outlined, your chance of success is nil," Hazelrigg warns.

6. Develop a viable research plan that "lays out step by step the approach to accomplishment of the research objective," Hazelrigg recommends.

7. The best proposals, suggests a guide by NSF's Education and Human Resources directorate, "are those to which the reviewers respond, 'Of course, I wish I had thought of that!'" Beyond a single idea, the research objective needs to be stated clearly early in the proposal - as in the first sentence. Opening paragraphs also should describe "the state of the field and its direction, and how your work is going to propel it to a better place," Kemnitzer says. She adds: "Reflect - aka think - how your work will impact society" and address a national need.

8. Follow instructions exactly. Again: Follow instructions exactly. Some 15 percent of proposals miss important parts of instructions, according to Kemnitzer. And check for updates, because deadlines can shift.

9. CAREER proposals require a letter from a department chair. It should outline the department's strategic vision and commit resources and attention to the applicant. "Often the department chair's letter makes the difference in who gets funded," says Kemnitzer.

10. You don't have to be Hemingway, but your proposal should be clearly written, grammatically correct, spellchecked, and proofread before it is submitted. "Thirty-five percent [of proposals] would get a D minus from technical-writing folks," says Kemnitzer. If the funding agency is geared to basic research, avoid the word "develop." Use active verbs, and map section titles to specific criteria in an RFP, Moses says. Keep the proposal as brief as possible, Hazelrigg suggests, with easily legible fonts: "Take pity on the reviewers." Avoid abbreviations, and spell out full names on first reference. Be aware that if your proposal is accepted, the abstract will appear on a public website and might be read by, among others, congressional staffers. To avoid misinterpretation, it needs to be understood by laymen.

11. By all means tout your credentials, publications, awards, and experience, but in the appropriate place: your bio. You need not brag within the proposal itself. When you cite the work of others, provide a correct reference.

12. Work on finding collaborators, either within your institution or elsewhere - even overseas. It also helps to show that you found partners in gathering supporting material - for instance, an energy proposal might include data from a utility

13. Budget realistically. Become aware of the size of grants an agency typically provides, and use that as a guide. Be sure to include money to pay graduate students.

14. Get an experienced colleague to review your proposal before submission. After you've sent it - in advance of the deadline - email the program manager for confirmation that it's been received.

15. Finally, volunteer to serve on a review panel. This won't give your own proposal preferential treatment, but it certainly won't hurt. And it will expose you to others' proposals, peer reactions, and the whole process of acceptance and rejection.


August 2014Congratulations, Julia !

IAC Friends,

Our colleague, Julia Melkers (PubPolicy) has been awarded two externally funded research grants:

-Principal Investigator, Evaluation Team, "Evaluating Atlanta BEST: Beyond the Professoriate: Transforming Pathways for Biomedical Research Careers." Funded by the National Institutes of Health and Emory University (2014-2019).

-Principal Investigator, External Evaluation Team, "Evaluating Research Team Capacity Development and Outcomes for the Kentucky EPSCoR Award 2014-19: Powering the Kentucky Bioeconomy for a Sustainable Future." Funded by the National Science Foundation, Subcontracted by the Kentucky NSF EPSCoR.

Congratulations - and all good wishes ! -Mary


IAC ADVANCE - and Website of Women Faculty

Dear IAC Friends,

Our IAC ADVANCE website profiles women faculty - and supports networks of communication, information, and exchange:
http://www.advanceiac.gatech.edu/index.php

Amanda Nabors, undergraduate partner, is sending templates for updating profiles for the coming academic year.

Thank you for your continuing participation in the ADVANCE network of IAC faculty - and our shared goals of equity, diversity, and excellence !

with good wishes - Mary



Welcome Fall Semester - and new IAC woman faculty member !

Dear IAC Friends,

Welcome to the upcoming Fall semester !

And welcome to our new IAC woman faculty member:
Kaye Husbands Fealing, Chair and Professor, School of Public Policy

With all good wishes - Mary


July 2014Marvel Comics create new female Thor

FYI Tidbit — The Wall Street Journal announced that Marvel Comics (Disney) is replacing the male Thor character with a new female Thor—one with with power, sound character, and integrity. The series writer Jason Aaron wanted to be clear about one thing:
“This is not She-Thor. This is not Lady Thor. This is not Thorita. This is THOR. This is the THOR of the Marvel Universe. But it’s unlike any Thor we’ve ever seen before.”

See http://blogs.wsj.com/speakeasy/2014/07/15/marvel-says-a-female-character-will-be-the-new-thor/?mod=e2tw


Articles of Nobel Laureates Rejected


As part of my research on the prolific in science, this came across the transom:

A unique documentation--not widely circulated--on the articles of Nobel Laureates and Clark Medalists that have been rejected - and eventual fate/outcomes of the articles: G. B. Shepherd, Rejected (1995)





Professional Development Opportunities

EXAMPLES OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR FACULTY



1. American Association of University Women Resources



Resources are available for developing leadership skills among women – including webinars and on-line forums: http://www.aauw.org/



2. American Council on Education (ACE) Fellowship Program



This program “enables participants to immense themselves in the culture, politics, and decision making process of another institution.” Opportunities are available to participate in multi-day sessions, develop a network of higher education leaders, and take on special projects and assignments under the mentoring of experienced leaders.



Applications are due in Fall of the year preceding potential participation:

http://www.acenet.edu/leadership/programs/Pages/ACE-Fellows-Program.aspx



3. Higher Education Resource Services (HERS) Leadership Institutes



HERS provides professional development for women in higher education administration. The Summer Institute, a partnership between HERS and Bryn Mawr College and the University of Denver, is a two-week residential professional development program. The curriculum allows participants to gains skills and perspectives for academic administration, and to build a national network for continuing information and exchange.



Applicants must have the support (financial and otherwise) of the dean or chief executive officer of their home institution:
http://hersnet.org/institutes/what-are-the-institutes/



4. Georgia Tech Institute on Leadership and Entrepreneurship (ILE)



ILE builds a network of campus leaders through an IMPACT speaker series and leadership roundtables among Georgia Tech faculty and staff that build tools and techniques for effective leadership. http://www.ile.gatech.edu/about/



5. Jefferson Science Fellows



The Jefferson Science Fellows Program is open to tenured faculty who are US citizens, and is administered by the National Academies, and partnerships between US academic science and the US Department of State and US Agency for International Cooperation. The program provides opportunities to travel to US embassies and missions abroad, and following the fellowship year, remain available as an experienced consultant on short-term projects.



The application period opens each Fall and closes in mid-January:

http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/Jefferson/index.htm



6. University System of Georgia (USG) Executive Leadership



The Executive Leadership Institute is a comprehensive 120-hour development program, over an eight (8) month period of required participation. The aim is to enhance leadership skills for potential high-level, administrative advancement within the University System of Georgia, through components including group learning, independent study, teleconferences, and action learning.



To be eligible, a participant needs to be employed in higher education for a minimum of three years, have positive evaluation ratings, demonstrated leadership competency, a minimum of a master’s degree, and a current title of Vice President, Chair, Dean or Executive Director (or equivalent). http://www.usg.edu/leadership_excellence/executive_leadership_institute


50th Anniversary of Civil Rights Act of 1064

The past week marked the 50th anniversary of the US Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Implementation was gradual - but the Act was the basis for voter registration and desegregation of schools and facilities serving the public ("public accommodations").

We may take faith in the courage of conviction of this Act in changing America.



June 2014Susan Cozzens' new book

IAC Friends,

More good news !

Newly published is Susan Cozzens' book, co-edited with Dhanaraj Thakur,
on Innovation and Inequality: Emerging Technologies in an Unequal
World(see flyer attached).

Congratulations to Susan on publication of her new book !


Congratulations, Janelle !

IAC Friends,

Our colleague, Janelle Knox-Hayes (PubPolicy) has received a Fulbright award for research and teaching in Iceland, as part of her work on understandings of the ways that societies manage the environmental impacts of modern economic systems.

Congratulations, Janelle - and all good wishes !


Congratulations, Lisa !

IAC Friends,

Our colleague, Lisa Yaszek (LMC) has been accepted to the Higher Education Resource Services (HERS) Leadership Institute at Bryn Mawr for summer 2014. This program offers academic women the opportunity to acquire continuing skills for leadership development and senior leadership positions in higher education.

Congratulations, Lisa - and all good wishes ! -Mary



The Cognitive Style of Powerpoint

IAC Friends,

If you have not seen it, do not miss it: The Gettysburg Address in Powerpoint http://norvig.com/Gettysburg/

In the larger context, this goes to E. Tufte's argument, "The Cognitive Style of Powerpoint" - http://users.ha.uth.gr/tgd/pt0501/09/Tufte.pd




Summer Time

Making Good Use of Summer - time

From: Mary McKinney, Ph.D. of Successful Academic Coaching and it appeared in the June 27, 2005 issue of The Successful Academic News. Copyright © 2000-07 Mary McKinney, Ph.D. - All Rights Reserved
Don't Waste Your Summer


. . . Based on extensive reading, and years of trying to become more productive, here are a few of my suggestions for making the best use of your summer. Ask yourself the following questions:

1) What is your number one priority for the summer?
The first key to using your time wisely is setting goals. Therefore, stop scattering your efforts without a clear focus and make sure that you accomplish the most important tasks to further your career.

If you are having trouble choosing your number one priority, there are two helpful questions to ask:
-What will make you feel the best when you complete it?
-What are you most anxious about?

Follow your instincts as well as your intellect. Focusing on your wishes and anxieties to determine your goals will keep you from spending hours preparing the syllabus for your fall class when you should be writing an article for publication.

2) How are you going to carve out time?
To accomplish your top priority, you need to free up hours that may not be available during the rest of the year. Except for those of us who are teaching summer classes, and trying to cram six months worth of material into six weeks, most of us have more flexibility in our schedules during the summer.

To make sure that you avoid over-commitments and unfocused business, ask these questions:

-What are you going to let go to make more time for your number one project?
-Are there less pressing projects and tasks that you can put on hold to gain hours, and mental space, for your top priority?

3) How can you increase your motivation?
When your summer deadline is only in your own mind, it is easy to shift your schedule and end up with a personal "incomplete" in August. Therefore, I tell the faculty and students I work with to "go public" to increase their sense of accountability. When you announce your goals and timeline to other people, you increase the likelihood that you'll follow through (if only to avoid embarrassment.)

Who are you going to promise that you'll meet your goals?
Tell your partner, your friends, your colleagues, your advisor that you'll have a draft of your project complete before the fall semester begins.



GT Child Care Centers - Spaces Available


The GT Child Care Centers are enrolling for Fall 2013 - with limited
space available. Our GT Child Care provides care for children ages 6
weeks to 6 years; provides scheduling for full-time or drop-in care; and
has infant, toddler, pre-school, and pre-kindergarten programs.

Contact:

www.brighthorizons.com/techhomepark

http://child-care-preschool.brighthorizons.com/GA/Atlanta/gtchildrenscampus/



May 2014 J. Royster: Outstanding Book Award

Our IAC Dean, Jackie Royster, has received the 2014 Winifred Bryan Homer Outstanding Book Award for her book, coauthored with Gesa Kirsch, on Feminist Rhetorical Practices: New Horizons for Rhetoric, Composition, and Literary Studies. This award, granted by the Coalition of Women Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition, recognizes outstanding scholarship and research in feminist pedagogy, practice, history, and theory.

Congratulations, Dean Royster!


2014 Spelman College Leadership Conference

Start your New Year off by investing in yourself!
Get blueprints for leadership success from global game-changers
Strengthen your network by connecting with other forward-thinking professionals
You will leave this conference with fresh, practical skills to successfully move you into the next decade of leadership.


Chairing Depts: What Would Buddha Say?

Finding Happiness as Chair: What the Buddha Said


Few would argue that one of the most complex jobs in higher education is that of the department chair. On the one hand, upper administrators often consider the chair position a necessary evil to control and direct both faculty and student actions and interests. They view the chair as primarily a faculty member who has one foot in administration and the other in the faculty ranks. Their perception of the role may change as their needs change. On the other hand, department faculty frequently consider the chair as a colleague who has succumbed to malevolent forces. For example, I once heard a faculty senate president, in an all-faculty presentation, refer to a newly appointed chair as someone who had "gone over to the dark side." In addition, students typically see the chair as their last hope for addressing a problem or their last stumbling block to getting what they want or need. The chair position becomes confused and complicated by the diverse views of those affected by a chair's actions and direction and by those whose actions affect the chair. Buddha had a few simple points of advice for individuals with complex occupations that may lead them to equilibrium: a life and job in balance.

More than 350 million people worldwide practice Buddhism in some form or another. If you consider Buddhism a religion, it would be the fourth largest religion in terms of numbers. Many, however, view Buddhism in its purist form as simply a philosophy without any attachment to deities or ritual practice. In this view, it presents a clear pathway to contentment in everyday life, including, we presume, the life of a department chair.

The Buddha began life some 2,500 years ago. He was born as a wealthy prince whose father protected him from seeing or experiencing any human suffering or discomfort. He eventually understood that everyone experiences difficulty and suffering of some sort. Sickness and death are the obvious, but he also realized that all humans suffer through disappointment in everyday life. The Buddha never suggested, however, that we do not experience happiness; rather, he indicated that happiness, like suffering, comes and goes beyond our control. The original Pali word for suffering was Dukkha, which translates as uneasiness, stress, imbalance, and other similar terms. The basic concept is that life, at times, will be out of balance. Department chairs can easily relate to a work life that is often imbalanced. Just like pulling a wagon with a flat wheel or driving over an unexpected pothole, life for a chair can be bumpy.

The Buddha set out four basic truths that describe life in general and more specifically the issues involved in making positive contributions when your position is a difficult one to balance. The four truths as they relate to the department chair are as follows:

The truth of suffering or imbalance (Dukkha): without doubt, the department chair position will cause feelings of discomfort or imbalance from time to time.
The cause of suffering or imbalance (Samudaya): The cause of our imbalance is our own attachment to the idea that things will work out: people will fulfill their
obligations with promptness, deans and provosts will fully support efforts, students will always be satisfied with their classes and grades, and faculty will treat the chair with respect and admiration. we all know that the opposite takes place with some frequency.The truth that suffering can end (Nirodha): The Buddha assured department chairs and all other living creatures that life can be balanced, our wheels can run true and the potholes will be filled
The truth of the path to remove suffering (Ariya Atthagika Magga): The Buddha set out a pathway of eight steps to bring life into balance and equilibrium, even for department chair
Many chairs find themselves in the midst of suffering or imbalance after a complex day of completing tasks, advising students, and comforting department faculty. Often there is little energy left for family commitments after a fourteen-hour day of cajoling, negotiating, reassuring, calming, cheering, consoling, and sometimes upsetting your provost, dean, faculty, and several students. Surely, chairs are looking for a pathway for better survival skills in the workplace. They may even want to find a way to experience more satisfaction and happiness while working in a most difficult occupation. This discussion leads us to what the Buddha said about seeking happiness as chair. In a nutshell, Buddha laid out an eight-point plan for removing Dukkha and finding happiness as a department chair.

Right view (Samma-Ditthi): Right view or wisdom is the understanding that the chair position, and life in general, is filled with potential pitfalls and dissatisfaction, which can lead to imbalance in our entire lives. Right view or wisdom is simply seeing clearly that the potential for imbalance is always one step away
Right intention (Samma-Sankappa): Right intention means having the right view toward yourself and others. It is turning the focus away from the selfish notion that
everything must go as planned and toward a commitment to bring contentment and balance to your department faculty, staff, and students.
Right speech (Samma-Vaca): Right speech seems to carry the most weight in finding happiness as chair. it requires speech that is truthful, reliable, and worthy of confidence. Department chairs should never knowingly speak a lie or untruth either for their advantage or for the advantage of others. A simple way to practice right speech is to speak only what is true, only what is necessary, and only what is kind. To speak truth in kindness sometimes feels conflicted; however, if a student or faculty member is not measuring up, the kindest thing to do is to give them opportunities to improve by discussing the problem directly. It may be difficult for the listener, but it provides him or her with a pathway to happiness.
Right action (Samma-Kammanta): like right speech, right action centers on the concept that our actions should focus on others and not ourselves. Department chairs should focus their efforts on providing active support to faculty, allowing them to excel in their research, teaching, and service opportunities. A chair's right actions will support and protect both students and faculty.
Right livelihood (Samma-Ajiva): Right livelihood is choosing an occupation that has as its main goal to serve others. Department chairs have an easy route in that the job is centered primarily on improving the lives of faculty and students.
Right effort (Samma-Vayama): Right effort refers to giving full intensity toward clearing the mind of thoughts and energies that prevent us from completely serving others. For the chair, this means approaching the job with everything aligned toward creativity and healing.
Right mindfulness (Samma Sati): Right mindfulness refers to total concentration on what is happening in this moment. The Buddha taught that our efforts should focus on the present moment and not on the past or future. This, of course, does not mean that planning is a bad habit, but rather that we should attend to our immediate actions in order to achieve a successful outcome. In addition, our full attention belongs to the person who is with us now, whether an administrator, faculty member, student, or any other.
Right concentration (Samma-Damadhi): Right concentration refers to developing the practice of unwavering focus and calmness of mind. It is learning to focus the mind on one object or task, a process akin to meditation. This practice aids us in all the steps to achieving happiness as a department chair.

For the last 2,500 years, Buddha's Four Noble Truths and Eightfold Path have provided a guide to finding happiness in the complexity of everyday life for millions across the world. Realizing the challenges of serving as department chair is the first step in doing the job well. This involves understanding that your life as chair will be filled with unexpected adventures, multifarious pathways, emergency undertakings, inventive contradictions, and exasperating individual interactions. Thus, it is imperative to find a passageway through the role's minefield. Buddha offers a simple pathway for finding happiness and contentment amid multiplicity.

----------
Randel Brown is chair of the Department of Professional Programs, and Diana Linn is chair of the Department of Curriculum and Pedagogy, both at Texas A&M International University.
Email:brown@tamiu.edu,dlinn@tamiu.edu


April 2014Invite from Sci Fi Lab

JOIN THE SCI FI LAB!

On Monday, April 22, the Sci Fi Lab will host an information session in Skiles 343 from 6-7 pm. Student members of the Lab will talk about their work with one of Georgia Tech's most unique radio programs, lead an open conversation about "what does science fiction mean to you?" to be aired on the last episode of the spring 2013 season, and tell you about all the different ways you, too, can get involved with the show. Both the conversation and the information session are free and open to all members of the Georgia Tech community.

The Sci Fi Lab is a weekly radio program dedicated to "the best in everything science fiction." The show is co-produced by Georgia Tech's School of Literature, Media and Communication, WREK radio, and the Georgia Tech Library. Listeners in the Atlanta area can catch the show live every Thursday from 7-8 pm EST on WREK 91.1; listeners further afield can stream the show live atwww.wrek.org or listen to it in the WREK archives athttp://www.wrek.org/scifilab/. If you would like to appear on the show or get involved in its production, contact Prof. Lisa Yaszek at lisa.yaszeklmc.gatech.edu or CM major Matthew Guzdial at mguzdial3gatech.edu.



Our colleague, Nancy Nersessian

Dear IAC Friends,

Our colleague, Nancy Nersessian, retires from Georgia Tech at the end of this semester. Nancy is Regents' Professor and Professor of Cognitive Science in the School of Interactive Computing and the School of Public Policy, and Adjunct Professor in the College of Architecture and School of Literature, Media, and Communication.

Nancy is an intellectual founder and leader of the highest caliber. She has fostered understandings of the cognitive and cultural mechanisms that support and sustain creative and innovative scientific practices. With funding from NSF, her current research addresses computational modeling practices in two biological laboratories toward understandings of how the models contribute to scientific breakthroughs.

She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Cognitive Science Science, as well as a Foreign Member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences. In 2011, she was awarded the inaugural Patrick Suppes Prize in Philosophy of Science by the American Philosophical Society.

Nancy is a self-exemplifying model of her own research: creative, innovative, and path-breaking in her original and lasting work.

We are honored to have had Nancy with us in IAC and Georgia Tech.

Our fond wishes go to Nancy in her continuing work and times ahead in the Boston-area, and her appointment as visiting professor at Harvard.




February 2014Academic Pathways and Passages

Dear IAC Friends,

Appreciation goes to you in sharing multiple journeys through academic pathways and passages in today's IAC ADVANCE Lunch Discussion. Thanks to panelists Susan Cozzens, Narin Hassan, and Katja Weber, to Dean Jackie Royster, and to all for sharing experiences and ways-sand-means for successful academic pathways.

Your commitment and community in shared goals of equity, diversity, and inclusion are at-core of the ADVANCE initiative !

With thanks and regards - Mary



Ellen DeGeneres- and the Bic pen

IAC Friends,


You 'gotta see this
Ellen DeGeneres on the Bic pen for women: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCyw3prIWhc


With laughs - Mary


January 2014MLK Day

M L King, Jr. Day
20 January

"I have been to the mountain top . . . "
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aL4FOvIf7G8


Harvard Business School - Apology & Remediation for Women

Harvard B-school dean offers unusual apology-

-- The dean of the Harvard Business School made an extraordinary public apology on Monday in San Francisco for his school's past behavior toward women. At a ballroom in the Ritz Carlton Hotel before 600 alumni and guests, Dean Nitin Nohria acknowledged that HBS had sometimes treated its female students and professors offensively.
Nohria conceded there were times when women at Harvard felt "disrespected, left out, and unloved by the school. I'm sorry on behalf of the business school," he told a hushed room. "The school owed you better, and I promise it will be better."
Among other things, Nohria pledged to more than double the percentage of women who are protagonists in Harvard case studies over the next five years, to 20%. Currently, about 9% of Harvard case studies -- which account for 80% of the cases studied at business schools around the world -- have women as protagonists. He said he would meet with HBS faculty on Wednesday to discuss the objective.
Many of the women in the audience, including more than 100 Harvard alumnae who were being honored by the HBS Association of Northern California for their impact on business and the community, let out an audible sigh at the 20% goal, thinking it was not ambitious enough. But they were unaware that the dean's objective would amount to a more than doubling of the current cases in which women are portrayed as central leaders in business problems.
His comments come five months after a lengthy front-page article in The New York Times that described the school's efforts to deal with gender inequality. The story fueled a major debate on gender issues at Harvard and many other business schools, bringing attention to a problem that is rarely discussed or acknowledged openly. Business schools remain male-dominated cultures where men account for the vast majority of students, faculty, and administrators.
Nohria's newly stated objective for case studies would have a big impact on the way leadership is taught in the world's business schools because almost all MBA students are exposed to HBS cases. His new initiative would be as ambitious as a previous effort by the school to make its case studies more global. Today, some 57% of Harvard's cases are international in nature, up from less than 5% a decade ago. The school produces roughly 250 new case studies a year.
At the event, Nohria said that a record 41% of this year's entering class of MBAs were women, up from 35% 10 years ago and only 25% in the class of 1985. "A lot of people wondered if we had to put a thumb on the scale," he said, to reach the record female enrollment number. "Everyone of those women deserve to be at Harvard Business School."
Harvard Business School began to admit women to its two-year MBA program in 1963 with eight students. Last year, the school ran a series of events to celebrate the 50th anniversary, using the shorthand "W50" to acknowledge the milestone. The school now has 11,000 MBA alumnae around the globe, including more than 1,200 women in Northern California.
The dean also told the group that last year's class of female MBA graduates at Harvard received a higher percentage of academic honors than their actual representation in the class of 2013. A record 38% of last year's Baker Scholars were women. Baker Scholars are graduates who make up the top 5% of Harvard's graduating class.
Noting a recent World Economic Forum report that showed the U.S. trailing more than 20 other countries when it comes to women in leadership roles, Nohria said "we can do better and we must do better. Harvard Business School has to lead the way to make that happen. We are taking many steps to ensure that W50 is not an event."
Besides the effort to "dramatically" increase the number of female protagonists in case studies, Nohria also pledged to launch a program to help more women serve on boards of directors and to more meaningfully encourage mentorship of female students and alumni. "We want to make sure the school provides pathways for alumni to help each other," added Nohria.
He said that some thought it "quaint" when Harvard first admitted women to the business school some 50 years ago and some could think it as quaint that he wants to increase female protagonists to 20%. "More than anything else, you have my deep and solid commitment that the entire school will be more open to and encouraging to women," Nohria vowed. "These ideas will only be quaint unless we work relentlessly to improve things."
Organizers of the event -- the first alumni chapter gathering to celebrate women -- say The Times article pushed Harvard's hand. The idea to recognize exceptional alumnae in the area was largely prompted as a way to demonstrate the impact made by HBS women through their leadership roles in both for-profit and non-profit organizations. Organizers said the gala's 600 seats sold out within three weeks.
"We couldn't be more pleased that the Association is celebrating the achievements of these women and building on the momentum of our 50th anniversary of women in the MBA program." said Nohria. "The women being honored are wonderful examples of leadership in their professions, their communities, and their family lives. They embody the HBS mission."
The Northern California alumni group also announced what it called the first fellowship for young women who have been admitted to HBS from the Bay Area. The club said it already had commitments for $500,000 toward a $1.5 million endowment for a fellowship that would fund several women each year.


December 2013Nelson Mandela, 1918 - 2013

Nelson Mandela's Inaugural Address
("never, never, and never again . ." speech)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grh03-NjHzc


November 2013Mary Jean Harrold - a beloved colleague

Dear IAC Friends,

Many of us knew Mary Jean Harrold, College of Computing - a leader for the advancement of women in academic science and engineering, and for broadening participation in computing. It was a shock that Mary Jean passed away September 19, 2013.

Mary Jean's memorial service was held at Georgia Tech on November 14 - with deep regret, I could not attend. Numbers of tributes and commemorations to Mary Jean occurred at the service --my tribute* was read by her collaborator, Alessandro Orso.

On Mary Jean's passing, our world diminished - she is remembered lovingly and always.

With regards, -Mary


October 2013Declaration & Call to Action on Women and Leadership

Colleagues,



We would like to announce the release of a new report titled, The Asilomar Declaration & Call to Action on Women and Leadership. It is a powerful document that has emerged from the ILA global women and leadership conference held at Asilomar (Pacific Grove, CA) in June of 2013. It includes declarations and calls for action around five sections:



1. Increasing Equality in Power and Decision-Making

2. Helping Girls and Young Women Become Leaders

3. Expanding Leadership Education and Development Worldwide

4. Advancing Women in Leadership

5. Identifying Critical Areas of Future Research



The report can be found at the following link: http://www.ila-net.org/Communities/AG/asilomar_declaration2013.pdf





Dr. Susan R. Madsen

Professor of Management

Orin R. Woodbury Professor of Leadership and Ethics

Utah Valley University, Woodbury School of Business

(801) 863-6176

madsensu@uvu.edu


September 2013Harvard Business School--and Gender Equity

Some interesting findings from:

Harvard Business School's efforts to improve gender equity for students and faculty (NY Times, Sept 8, 2013)
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/08/education/harvard-case-study-gender-equity.html?hp


SOAR Event - Friday/Sept 6

From Janet Murray:

SOAR event this Friday: At the initiation of a diverse group of IAC faculty with common research interests, and thanks to the enthusiastic support of Dean Royster and the organizing efforts of Jennifer Clark, Director of the Center for Urban Innovation, IAC is holding an institute wide mini-retreat on Friday focusing on social and economic research on access and opportunity. All interested faculty and grad students are invited to attend. See the description here: http://www.urbaninnovation.gatech.edu/general-news/symposium-on-opportunity-and-access-research-soar/ and please register so we can get a good head count on attendees. Feel free to circulate this information and recruit other interested faculty and graduate students. Registration: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1B43OJ5k2nhDyLJQm2pl5mxOoTj2T7KH6_BFA0ojngxc/viewform


August 2013 50th anniversary: M. L. King - "I Have a Dream"

50th anniversary:
28 August 1963
M. L. King, "I Have a Dream" Speech
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smEqnnklfYs


Welcome Fall Semester - and new IAC women faculty !

Dear IAC Friends,

Welcome to the Fall semester !

And welcome to our new IAC women faculty:
Mariel Borowitz, Assistant Professor, Sam Nunn School of International Affairs
Mary McDonald, Professor and Homer Rice Chair, School of History, Technology, and Society



Who Gets Flex-time?

IAC Friends,

Interesting research:

"Ask and Ye Shall Receive? The Dynamics of Employer-Provided Flexible Work Options and the Need for Public Policy"
Victoria Brescoll, Jennifer Glass, Alexandra Sedlovskaya

Journal of Social Issues
Volume 69, Issue 2, pages 367–388, June 2013


This article addresses two fundamental questions about flexible scheduling: Do managers use ascriptive information in deciding which requests for flexible work scheduling to grant among employees? And, do employees comprehend this managerial bias in deciding whether to ask for flexible work arrangements? Study 1 found that managers were most likely to grant flextime to high-status men seeking flexible schedules in order to advance their careers. In contrast, flexible scheduling requests from women were unlikely to be granted irrespective of their job status or reason. In Study 2, we found that employees were unaware of these managerial biases: women assigned high-status jobs and requests for career advancement reasons were the most likely to think their requests would be granted, while men in the same scenarios were least likely to believe this. Organizational and policy implications are discussed.

More later - Mary


June 2013Nominations for Georgia Woman of the Year Scholarship

From:
Georgia Woman of the Year Scholarship Committee, Inc.
Georgia Commission on Women
Georgia Women's Institute

Re:
Request for Scholarship Nominations

The Georgia Woman of the Year Committee, Inc., in cooperation with the
Georgia Commission on Women and the Georgia Women's Institute, has
established a scholarship awards program for women currently attending
Georgia colleges and universities. Scholarship grants of $1,000.00 each
will be given in honor of the 2013 Georgia Woman of the Year. The
organization has distributed approximately $85,000.00 since the program
began in 1998.

Nominations for the scholarships may be made by a faculty member in any
college, university or technical college in Georgia. There are no
requirements based on study. A letter describing the assessment of the
nominee's qualifications, with any supporting information, should be
mailed or sent electronically to the Georgia Woman of the Year
Committee's scholarship committee at the address below, by Thursday,
August 1, 2013.

Georgia Woman of the Year Committee, Inc.
Georgia Commission on Women
148 Andrew Young International Blvd, N.E.
Suite 250
Atlanta, GA 30303

Scholarships will be awarded on Tuesday, August 20th, at the annual
Georgia Woman of the Year awards dinner. Nominations may also be
e-mailed to



May 2013Child Indicators in a Globalized World: Implications for Research, Practice and Policy

Main Theme: Child Indicators in a Globalized World: Implications for Research, Practice and Policy.
Date: May 29 – 31, 2013.
Venue: Hoam Faculty House, Seoul National University, Korea.
Contact information: ISCI Conference Team isci2013@gmail.com
Department of Social Welfare, Seoul National University, Korea
Website: www.2013isci.org
Important Deadlines:
Abstract submission – November 30, 2012
Full paper submission (optional) – March 15, 2013
Early bird registration – before February 28, 2013
Regular registration – after February 28, 2013

The 4th ISCI conference will explore how child indicators can be used to improve the well-being of children in a globalized world under the conference’s main theme “Child Indicators in a Globalized World: Implications for Research, Practice and Policy.”

- Topics to be addressed in the conference include
- Theory and conceptual frameworks of child indicators
- Measurement, data, and methods on child indicators
- Dissemination of child indicators
- Advocacy using child indicators
- Policy and program development using child indicators
- Children’s subjective well-being
- Information technology and child indicators
- Child indicators across cultures and borders
- ‘Glocalization’ of child indicators

- Abstract submission
- Deadline for abstract submission is November 30, 2012
- Guidelines for submission can be found on our homepage www.2013isci.org
Notice! Full paper submission is optional

- Registration
Now possible through our website at www.2013isci.org

- Conference Venue
The 4th ISCI Conference will be held at Hoam Faculty House located at the Seoul National University’s campus.
Detailed information about the venue, accommodation and transportation can be found on our homepage www.2013isci.org

- Speakers for Plenary Sessions
The 2013 ISCI Conference Team is proud to present the following distinguished speakers for plenary sessions.

Professor Asher Ben-Arieh
Asher Ben-Arieh is a professor of Social Work at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the director of the Haruv Institute in Jerusalem. Ben-Arieh served for 20 years as the associate director of Israel's National Council for the Child. He was among the founding members of the International Society for Children Indicators (ISCI) and serves as its first co-chair. He is one of the leading international experts on social indicators, particularly as they relate to child well-being. Ben-Arieh is the founding editor in chief of the Child Indicators Research (CIR) journal and the Children well being: Research and Indicators book series.

Professor Yanghee Lee
Yanghee Lee currently holds joint appointments in the Law School; Department of Child Psychology and Education; and Department of Human Resources Development at Sungkyunkwan University. Lee has been a member of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child since 2003 and has served as its Chair from 2007-2011 and is currently serving as its Vice-Chair. She has been the guiding force in the drafting, negotiation, and adoption of the 3rd Optional Protocol to the CRC on Communications Procedure. She also serves on the Advisory Committee of the National Human Rights Commission of Korea, the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare, Ministry of Gender Equality, and the Korean Ministry of Justice.

Professor Jonathan Bradshaw
Jonathan Bradshaw is a Professor of Social Policy at the University of York, UK. Bradshaw is a member of the ISCI Board. His most recent book is titled The Well-being of children in the UK (Policy Press 2011). He is a consultant to UNICEF and contributed to Innocenti Report Cards 10 and 11 and has published a number of comparative studies of child well-being and child benefit packages. He is a Trustee of the Child Poverty Action Group and an Hon. Fellow of UNICEF, UK.

Contact information:
ISCI Conference Team
Department of Social Welfare,
Seoul National University, Korea
e-mail: isci2013@gmail.com
Tel.: (82) 2-880-6456
Fax: (82) 2-888-6981
Address: 16-331 Department of Social Welfare,
College of Social Science,
Seoul National University,
599 Kwanak-ro, Kwanak-gu,
Seoul 151-746, KOREA.


March 2013Speculative Visions of Race, Technology, Science, & Survival Conference

CALL FOR CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS
Deadline: November 5, 2012

Conference Date: March 15-16, 2013
UC Berkeley * Center for Race & Gender

What will survival entail in near and far futures? In light of racialized violence and social control, massive technological innovation, and rapid transformations in science and biomedicine, this conference will engage the imperative to imagine, study, prepare for, and articulate future human life. We are interested in how science and technology shape the material and epistemological boundaries of existence, specifically how and whose existence is valued, policed, corporealized, and corporatized. We will also explore the capacity of embodied subjects to navigate these boundaries in the context of dis/abled, gendered, sex/uality, and queer formations. Recognizing that technology creates kinds of futures (both anticipated and unforeseen), this conference will create a space to analyze how technologies of the past and present contextualize and disclose future realities, and identify opportunities for creating new possibilities.

We envision a limited number of presentations in order to allow enough time for generative dialogue and crafting of questions for future research and development. This conference will be multi/interdisciplinary and multimedia.

We invite conference abstracts. Examples of conference themes include race in the context of:
- gender & sexual transformations and horizons
- biotechnological interventions (including reproductive technologies) & genetic justice
- environmental transformation & population displacement
- Afrofuturisms, Indigenous visions, and alternative futurist metaphysics and spacescapes
- de/construction of the human and non-human: cyborgisms, borderlands, assemblage, species relations, alien life
- singularities and artificial intelligence
- bio-surveillance, fatal inventions, and capitalism
- disability/disabled imaginaries
- medical experimentation, living laboratories, mission creep
- cryogenics, radical life extension, and the politics of medicine, aging, and existence
- militarism, occupations, and final frontiers
- speculative & science fiction: novels, film, music, performance, etc, e.g. Battlestar Galactica, Star Trek, Planet of the Apes, Octavia Butler, Sherman Alexie, Samuel Delany, AI, The Brother From Another Planet, Sun Ra, etc.

Please send the following to specvisions@gmail.com by November 5, 2012:

1) name & affiliation
2) presentation title and abstract (~500 words)
3) brief bio
4) contact info (address, e-mail, phone, fax)

More details: http://crg.berkeley.edu/content/speculative-visions-call


November 2012NSF Division Director Search

The National Science Foundation is conducting a search for the position of Division Director, Division of Human Resource Development. This Division serves as a focal point for NSF's agency-wide commitment to enhancing the quality and excellence of STEM education and research through broadening participation by historically underrepresented groups – minorities, women and persons with disabilities.

Information about this position and the application process is available at USAJOBS: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/330681500?org=NSF.

Please note that the application deadline is December 18th.


October 2012Announcement: Dr. Julie R. Ancis, Associate Vice President for Institute Diversity

Dear Colleagues:

I am pleased to announce that effective September 6, 2012, Dr. Julie R. Ancis was appointed as Associate Vice President for Institute Diversity. In her new role, Dr. Ancis will report to the Vice President for Institute Diversity and will provide operational leadership for strategic planning and assessment to identify appropriate action agendas to achieve Georgia Tech’s inclusive excellence vision and our diversity and equity goals. She will also develop and lead campus collaborations to support our goals for an inclusive campus community and enhanced campus climate.

Dr. Ancis’ major administrative responsibilities include:
• Providing operational leadership of planning processes to develop strategic actions and metrics to guide and assess Georgia Tech’s progress with achieving our diversity, equity, and inclusion goals in support of the Institute’s Strategic Plan;
• Providing operational leadership for campus climate assessment to enhance campus inclusion goals and aspirations;
• Developing, coordinating and supporting campus-wide diversity education/training initiatives, leadership programs, and co-curricular programs aimed at building cultural competence/capacity and inclusive environments;
• Providing diversity consultation services to support diversity/climate assessment in academic and administrative units;
• Developing annual reports on inclusive excellence at Georgia Tech; and
• Providing operational leadership of Institute Committees to promote collaborations in support of inclusive excellence initiatives for faculty, staff, and students (including but not limited to support of symposia and town hall events to promote interactive learning opportunities for faculty, staff, and students and to strengthen campus connections with diverse communities in the region).

Prior to joining the Office of Institute Diversity, Dr. Ancis was a Professor in the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services at Georgia State University and held previous faculty appointments at Old Dominion University and University at Albany, State University of New York.
Please join me in welcoming Dr. Ancis to her new position, and I ask for your support in her transition to Tech.

Sincerely,

Archie Ervin, Ph.D.
Vice President for Institute Diversity
Office of Institute Diversity


September 2012GT Nursing Moms Rooms

Dear IAC Friends,

Initiated by GT ADVANCE, and now administered by the Office of the Vice President for Institute Diversity, Georgia Tech has Nursing Mom Rooms at four (4) different areas of the GT campus:
1) Tech Tower, First Floor Women’s Lounge
2) Wenn Student Center, Third Floor Women’s Lounge
3) College of Management, Room 4144
4) Klaus Building, Room 1227

For details on the rooms and using them, please see the Attached - and please let me know if I may help with any questions.

With good wishes - Mary


GT Active Service - Modified Duties

Dear IAC Friends,

Here are the guidelines for the GT Active Service-Modified Duties.

Please let me know if you may want to discuss any aspects.

With good wishes - Mary


Georgia Tech Active Service - Modified Duties
Statement of Intent:
The Institute recognizes the need for academic faculty members to balance the commitments of both family and work. The Institute recognizes that an academic faculty member may be presented with circumstances that cause substantial alterations to his/her daily routine and thus need to construct a modified workload and flexible schedule for a short time, or permanently. The Institute recognizes that such circumstances may vary widely for faculty members at different stages of their careers and with different family and workload situations. Such circumstances include the birth or adoption of a child, or the severe illness of a parent, spouse or child.

The Institute is committed to working with a faculty member to devise a workload and schedule that enables the faculty member to remain an active member of the faculty, but with a modified workload. However, while the Institute endeavors to meet the needs of its faculty, the Institute must also meet the needs of its students, and do so within certain budgetary constraints.

A faculty member is encouraged to speak with his/her school chair as soon as possible about active service-modified duties options in order to ensure the maximum amount of time for planning. A school chair, in conjunction with the relevant dean, is responsible for working with a faculty member to ensure that his/her rights are protected, a fair plan for modified duties is implemented if possible, budgetary constraints are considered, and student needs are met. Active service-modified duties options could include a decreased teaching or service load; final decisions about the nature of the modified duties are the responsibility of the school chair, in consultation with the dean.

Procedure:
1. A faculty member may apply for Active Service-Modified Duties (currently available only to tenured/tenure track faculty). The request should be made one (1) semester prior to intended use. The lead time for requests may be waived in emergency circumstances. The request is submitted to the Provost, in writing, *after being processed through the faculty member's unit chair and/or dean.*

What to Include in Your Request:
• Name of Faculty member requesting AS/MD
• Name of School and/or College
• Reason for request (e.g. childbirth)
• Modification of Duties (proposed activities)
• Amount of AS/MD funding requested
• When (semester or academic year) the modified activities will take place
• Approval of Dean must be noted in request letter if it originates from the School Chair

Request Letter Formats:
• Faculty member generates letter of request with proposed activities for Chair/Dean's approval. The plan of proposed activities is developed in consultation with the School Chair and the Dean's office. The duties may be school-based or college-based or a combination thereof). Once approved, Chair/Dean includes a cover letter (including all other requirements) to Provost with the Faculty member's letter attached.
OR
• At the request of the faculty member, Chair/Dean generates AS/MD request letter with all required information.

2. Modification of duties should not result in additional duties during any subsequent semesters, (e.g. teaching loads cannot be made up after the Active Service-Modified Duties semester).

3. The Active Service-Modified Duties plan may result in a 0-100% appointment. The faculty member may request a less than 100% time appointment. In this case, the faculty member may have to request an official leave of absence from Georgia Tech. NOTE: The Office of Faculty Affairs must be consulted for all issues related to official leave. Leave issues are handled separately from AS/MD and should not be included in requests for AS/MD.

Please direct questions and requests for additional information to the Georgia Tech Office of Faculty Affairs.


August 2012Welcome Fall Semester - and new IAC women faculty!

Dear IAC Friends,

Welcome to the Fall semester!

And welcome to our new IAC women faculty:
- Jenna Jordan, Assistant Professor, Sam Nunn School of International Affairs
- Dina Khapaeva, Chair of the School of Modern Languages

With all good wishes - Mary


July 2012ADVANCE Program Announces Equity Initiative

Dear IAC Friends,

We look forward to your participation in the ADVANCE Equity Initiative!

With good wishes - Mary

http://daily.gatech.edu/digest/advance-program-announces-equity-initiative


June 2012Opening in Fall 2012: New On-Site Early Care/Education Center for Children

Opening in Fall 2012:
The Children’s Campus @ Georgia Tech, a new on-site early care and education center for children of Georgia Tech faculty, staff and students.
Th Capacity will be 101 children from 6 weeks of age to 5 years.

A Parent Information Session will be held on Wednesday, June 27, at the Student Center Ballroom from noon to 1:00 pm. Faculty, staff and students are not required to attend the information session to complete an Enrollment Interest Form.

Enrollment Interest Forms will be accepted from interested faculty, staff, and students with a GTID number. Georgia Tech families currently on the wait list at the R. Kirk Landon Learning Center will be given first priority for enrollment based on their position on the waitlist. Applications received will be awarded spaces in the Center on a first-come, first-enrolled basis.

For additional information about the curriculum, tuition, and the enrollment process, visit the R. Kirk Landon Learning Center website at www.brighthorizons.com/techhomepark
Forms can be downloaded from the Bright Horizons website at Bright Horizon Family Solutions.


April 20127th European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education

Education in Bergen, Norway, August 29-31 2012 - Call for posters! 7th European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education: Gender Equality in a Changing Academic World Date: August 29 - 31, 2012 Location: Bergen, Norway http://www.uib.no/gender2012 In August the University of Bergen welcomes to the 7th European Conference on Gender Equality in Higher Education. The conference will focus on gender equality in a changing academic world against the backdrop of the current financial crisis in Europe and beyond. The European conferences on gender equality in higher education have since 1998 regularly brought together hundreds of gender equality practitioners, researchers and administrators from Europe and beyond. The conferences provide an international forum to discuss and exchange information and experiences and share research results on the changes and challenges related to gender in academia, gender equality promotion and interventions in higher education institutions. Keynote speakers: Alexandra Bitusikova (Slovakia), Curt Rice (Norway), Cordelia Fine (Australia), Renata Siemienska (Poland), Mari Teigen (Norway) and Kathrin Zippel (USA). Topics for the parallel sessions: · The financial crisis in the world and changing conditions for research and higher education. How will it affect gender equality in academia? · Autonomy reforms in higher education and gender equality · Gender mainstreaming in universities: challenges and successes · Assessing the impact of gender equality interventions and measures · Intersectionality, masculinities and gender equality in academia · Gender and career trajectories · Excellence and research policy in relation to equality Sign up for the conference here: Registration - Click here! Call for posters - click here! Deadline May 31, 2012


March 201210th International Conference on Books & Publishing - 30 June - 1 July 2012

TENTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON BOOKS AND PUBLISHING 30 June - 1 July 2012 Universidad Abat Oliba CEU, Barcelona, Spain http://www.booksandpublishing.com/conference-2012/ The Books and Publishing Conference serves as an inclusive forum for examining the past, current and future role of the book. It proceeds from recognition that although the book is an old medium of expression, it embodies half a millennium's experience of recording knowledge. Its pervasive influence continues to shape newer forms of information technology, while at the same time providing a reference point for innovation. This year's Books and Publishing Conference will take place in Barcelona, Spain at Universidad Abat Oliba CEU. Barcelona is home to architecturally notable buildings that date back to Roman settlements and is home to the World Heritage Site works of architect Antoni Gaudi, including the famous Sagrada Familia Church. Conference participants will have the opportunity to embark on a guided tour of Barcelona that will highlight world-renowned points of interest. For information on accommodations visit http://booksandpublishing.com/conference-2012/accommodation/ . The conference will include numerous paper, workshop and colloquium presentations by practitioners, teachers and researchers. We would particularly like to invite you to respond to the conference call-for-papers. Presenters may choose to submit written papers for publication in the fully refereed International Journal of the Book. If you are unable to attend the conference in person, virtual registrations are also available which allow you to submit a paper for refereeing and possible publication, as well as access to the Journal. Whether you are a virtual or in-person presenter at this conference, we also encourage you to present on the conference YouTube Channel. Please select the Online Sessions link on the conference website for further details. We also invite you to join us on Facebook, Twitter, and Flickr at http://www.BooksandPublishing.com/conference-2012/ . The next deadline for the next round in the call for papers (a title and short abstract) is 3 April 2012. Future deadlines will be announced on the conference website after this date. Proposals are reviewed within two weeks of submission. Full details of the conference, including an online proposal submission form, may be found at the conference website - http://booksandpublishing.com/conference-2012/ . We look forward to receiving your proposal and hope that you will be able to join us in Barcelona in 2012. Yours sincerely, Karim Gherab-Martin Research Scientist Spanish National Research Council - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientícas (CSIC) Madrid, Spain For the Advisory Board, International Conference on the Book and International Journal of the Book


January 2012 Invitation to sign the Manifesto on Gender, Research & Innovation

http://gender-summit.eu/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=278:manifesto-text-a-petition&catid=20:manifesto&Itemid=42


October 2011Kristie Macrakis - Talk on Monday/Oct. 3

Dear IAC Friends,

Our colleague, Kristie Macrakis (HTS), will be giving on talk on Monday/October 3, 4 pm, Old Civil Engineering Building, Room 104:
*Winning the Secret Ink War*
Kristie Macrakis

During World War I, the secret ink war played an important role in the general war and was part and parcel of the spy wars between the allies and Germany. As a result, invisible ink assumed the status of codes and ciphers (cryptography) as an arbiter between rival nations in a test tube battle of wits.

This power-point, semi-popular presentation, illustrated with numerous spy cases, shows how invisible ink became a major player in international intrigue after 300 years of playing little sister to its big brother cryptography.

With good wishes - Mary


August 2011NSF - Positions in Directorate for Education and Human Resources

The National Science Foundation’s Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR) is pleased to announce that there are permanent and temporary Program Director positions available. The deadline to apply for a permanent position is September 2, 2011. There is no deadline for a temporary position as applications are accepted on a rolling basis. Prior experience as an NSF Program Director is not required to be considered for either type of position.

If you are interested in applying for either of these positions, please see the information below. If you know of colleagues who may be interested in either of these opportunities, we ask that you please forward the announcement below and thank you in advance for your assistance in recommending bright and diverse talent in our Nation to serve in these critical roles.

Sincerely,

Sue Allen, PhD

Acting Division Director

Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings &am p;nb sp;

Directorate for Education & Human Resources 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 885 Arlington, VA 22230

1) PERMANENT PROGRAM DIRECTOR POSITIONS (deadline 9/2/11)

The National Science Foundation’s Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR) seeks candidates with expertise in research on STEM learning and education for one or more permanent Program Director positions.

NSF Program Directors assume primary responsibility for carrying out the Agency’s overall mission—to support innovative and merit-reviewed projects in basic research and education that contribute to the nation’s technical strength, security, and welfare. Program Directors possess knowledge in the appropriate fields, a commitment to high standards, a considerable breadth of interest in and receptivity to new ideas, a strong sense of fairness, good judgment, and a high degree of personal integrity.

The central duties of the position include: contributing to a coherent vision for EHR and STEM education research; participating in collaborative activity in relation to STEM research, practice, and policy; organizing and overseeing proposal review panels; evaluating, negotiating, and funding research proposals; managing awarded projects; and drafting solicitations. Successful candidates are expected to serve in one principal division of EHR, but, as requested, will also contribute to the work of other EHR divisions, work cooperatively across the entire Foundation, and interact productively with other agencies. They will be abreast of the cutting-edge research literatures in fields relevant to this position and will be able to provide high-level advice to others in the directorate and Foundation. Successful candidates should establish contacts and maintain active involvement in the field through participation in meetings and other relevant activities, and through the pursuit of a personal scholarly agenda, as workload permits.

Applicants for the EHR Program Director position must have a Ph.D. or equivalent experience and six or more years of successful research experience relevant to the position, such as education or learning research in any science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) field, evaluation, statistics, measurement, or any of the behavioral, cognitive, or social science bases of STEM learning. Ideal candidates bring strong methodological or measurement expertise in combination with knowledge of teaching or learning in STEM. The candidate should also have the ability to think broadly but critically across domains, and to participate in discussions of research issues in STEM education at a national or international level.

Application information regarding these permanent Program Director positions may be found at: http://jobview.usajobs.gov/GetJob.aspx?OPMControl=2345323&org=NSF

2) TEMPORARY PROGRAM DIRECTOR POSITIONS (no deadline)

In addition to the EHR positions, the Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings (DRL) is engaged in an ongoing nationwide search for temporary Program Directors.

DRL currently manages the following programs: Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering (REESE), Discovery Research K-12 (DRK-12), Informal Science Education (ISE), and Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST), in addition to Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER), and other programs.

Candidates for the DRL Program Director position should have a Ph.D. or equivalent experience, and additional experience and expertise depending on which DRL Cluster they are applying to: Knowledge Building (KB); Resources, Models, and Technologies (RMT); or Lifelong Learning Cluster (LLC). Detailed requirements may be found at the link below.

Program Directors hired under this announcement will be appointed under a Visiting Scientist Appointment, an Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) Assignment, or a Temporary Excepted Service Appointment.

Application information regarding these temporary Program Director positions may be found at: http://nsf.gov/pubs/2010/drl10001/drl10001.jsp?org=NSF

NSF IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER COMMITTED TO EMPLOYING A HIGHLY QUALIFIED STAFF THAT REFLECTS THE DIVERSITY OF OUR NATION.


Welcome New Faculty

Welcome to the Fall semester - and special welcome from us to the new, IAC women faculty !

Shatakshee Dhongha (ECON)
Karen Head (LCC)
Kimberley Isett (PUBPOLICY)
Lauren Klein (LCC)
Jennifer Singh (HTS)


July 2011Women and Leadership: Closing the Gender Gap

Upcoming conference on Women and Leadership: Closing the Gender Gap,13th & 14th September, 2011 at Oxford Brookes University.

This conference will bring together academics, policy makers and women
leaders in the public and voluntary sectors, business and politics.
Discussion will focus on the experience of women who have successfully
achieved leadership positions, but also on the reasons for
under-representation in leadership and the strategies that could be adopted to increase their presence in senior posts across all sectors.

For more information about this conference and details of how to
register, please use the weblink below:

http://www.brookes.ac.uk/about/events/women


May 2011Announcement: Vice President for Institute Diversity - Positions

The Office of the Vice President for Institute Diversity invites applications and nominations for the following positions:



o Executive Director for Research and Institute Collaborations

o Associate Vice President for Institute Diversity and Inclusion



We would like your help in identifying candidates for these important positions as our search committee will be reviewing applications and nominations in the coming weeks.



If you know a colleague who you believe should be considered, please have them e-mail their CV, letter of application, and the names and contact information of three references to: Raj Thyagarajan, Office of the Provost,

rajashree@gatech.edu.

We are seeking candidates who articulate a strategic vision for inclusive excellence for the Office of the Vice President for Institute Diversity and the Institute; provide direction and incentives for diversity, equity and inclusion, creative achievement and service; and address the recruitment, retention, and advancement of historically underserved minority and female faculty, staff and students in STEM fields.

He/she must have a demonstrated record of successful leadership; exceptional communication and interpersonal skills; outreach activities; demonstrated leadership and abilities in the administration of higher education, preferably in a large research institution within a multi-campus environment, and the ability to mobilize volunteers and stakeholders for the enhancement of the Institute


April 2011Post-Doctoral Fellow

Job Description

The Post-Doctoral Fellow will analyze an existing dataset and co-author research publications as a member of the large-scale empirical research project “Factors Influencing College Success in Mathematics” (FICSMath). This project examines the role of high school experiences and other background factors in predicting performance in college calculus classes of more than 10,000 students at 131 participating colleges. The fellow’s responsibilities include conducting literature searches and reviews pertaining to the FICSMath project, developing testable hypotheses, conducting quantitative and statistical data analyses to test these hypotheses, and writing up the results in publishable form, under the guidance of the PI and in co-authorship with senior members of the research team. The Fellow’s efforts will focus on modeling students’ performance in college calculus, based on their different pedagogical experiences in high school mathematics classes, using techniques such as hierarchical linear modeling, logistic regression, propensity weighting, and factor analysis.



Please note that this position is grant-funded through 9/30/2012.



Job Requirements

Doctoral degree in a social science, education, science/math education, or mathematics. Evidence of publication productivity in peer-reviewed journals. Strong literature review and statistical skills. Knowledge of calculus preferred. Teaching experience in mathematics at the high school or college levels would be a plus.



Contact

Gerhard Sonnert, Ph.D.
Science Education Department
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics


SEMINAR IN EXPERIMENTAL CRITICAL THEORY VII

The University of California Humanities Research Institute presents
in conjunction with the Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Hawai'i at M?noa
SEMINAR IN EXPERIMENTAL CRITICAL THEORY VII
ReWired:
Asian/TechnoScience/Area
Studies
August 1-10, 2011 at the University of Hawai'i at M?noa

The Seminar will address how technoscientific knowledge-systems are re-ordered when geo-political formations shift.
You "don't invent the future," John Seely Brown famously noted - "you unleash it by leveraging the global community mind."
Today the fastest expansion of technoscientific knowledge production and urban development is occurring across multiple Asian sites in the throes of techno-economic boom. Seely Brown's observation, made in conversation with Paul Duguid, was meant to characterize late 20th century knowledge institutions and sites of technological production in the US. It nevertheless uncannily predicts the radical de-centering of global technological futures in the 21st century, not least in the Asian context.
The 2011 Seminar in Experimental Critical Theory (SECT VII) seeks to elucidate these rapidly transforming landscapes of knowledge production, the shaping of contemporary knowledge institutions, their impact on social life in intense urban contexts, and this century's techno-scientific horizons of possibility. Comprehending these movements, forces, and structures requires integrating deep understandings of history and politics represented by Asian and critical Area Studies with emergent work on the transnational dynamics of science and technology as well as on market economies and their modes of governance.

For a complete description, please visit the SECT VII Website


January 2011Gender, Science, and Engineering

Jacqueline J. Royster, Dean of the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts,
and Don P. Giddens, Dean of the College of Engineering

Cordially invite you to the Reception and Lecture,

Gender, Science, and Engineering

honoring Sue V. Rosser,
Provost, San Francisco State University,
former Dean of the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts,
and Professor Emerita in the School of Public Policy,
Georgia Institute of Technology

January 12, 2011

3:30 pm - Reception
4:00 pm - Lecture


Lecture by:

Londa Schiebinger,
John L. Hinds Professor of History of Science,
Director of the Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine, and Engineering
Project,
Stanford University

With discussants:

Gilda Barabino,
Professor and Associate Chair for Graduate Studies,
The Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University

Anne Pollock,
Assistant Professor, Science, Technology and Culture,
School of Literature, Communication and Culture,
Georgia Institute of Technology

Clary Theater
The Bill Moore Student Success Center
Georgia Institute of Technology
Atlanta, Georgia


November 2010International Conference: Equality, Growth & Sustainability - Do They Mix?

First call for abstracts for the international conference

EQUALITY, GROWTH AND SUSTAINABILITY ? DO THEY MIX?

25-26 November 2010, Linkoping University, Sweden

Registration and submission details at:
< http://www.liu.se/genusforum/Konferens>http://www.liu.se/genusforum/Konferens

Please note that we also welcome proposals for
potential paper sessions and interactive workshops until 15 April.

For further information
contact:  < mailto:stina.backman@liu.se> stina.backman@liu.se

Elisabeth Samuelsson
Forum för genusvetenskap och jämställdhet
Linkopings universitet
581 83 Linkoping
Sweden


Equality, Growth, and Sustainability

Equality, Growth and Sustainability - do they mix?
Linköping  University, Sweden, 25-26 November 2010

This conference is a forum for examining if and how questions of 
equality, growth and sustainability can be reconciled in organisations 
and implemented in general practice.

15 years after the Beijing Platform for Action this conference will 
provide academics, policy makers and practitioners with an 
international and interdisciplinary forum for exchange. The purpose is 
to explore and disseminate knowledge and experiences on gender 
equality, gender mainstreaming, diversity management, growth and 
sustainability, inclusion and equal opportunities. The ambition is to 
discuss these key concepts and issues from an intersectional 
perspective, and in theory and practice, in order to rethink and find 
new ways to move on.

Key note speeches will be delivered by Marina Blagojevic, Tryggvi 
Hallgrimsson, Jeff Hearn, Vivane Reding and Mieke Verloo.  A panel 
discussion with Irma Erlingdsdóttir, Liisa Husu, Malin Rönnblom and 
Mustafa Özbilgin concludes the conference. Two kinds of interactive 
conference formats will take place: parallel paper sessions and 
workshops. A paper session contains academic paper presentations and 
you are welcome to submit an abstract. A workshop is a forum where you 
can listen to interesting presentations and take part in discussions. 
Both formats are of course open to all participants.

Extended deadline for submission of abstracts: 1 August, 2010. More information, submission details and registration at:  
http://www.liu.se/genusforum/Konferens


"Too Nice to Land a Job"

According to this study, job candidates who are described in recommendation letters as "caring," "supportive" or "sensitive" may face a lower chance of landing a job because these
adjectives are regarded as feminine.

"Too Nice to Land a Job"




International Conference on the Book

EIGHTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE BOOK     
6-8 November 2010     
University of St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland     
http://www.Book-Conference.com

The Book Conference serves as an inclusive forum for examining the past, current and future role of the book. It proceeds from recognition that although the book is an old medium of expression, it embodies thousands of years' experience of recording knowledge. The pervasive influence of this experience continues to shape newer forms of information technology, while at the same time providing a reference point for innovation.

St. Gallen is home to the renowned Abbey of St. Gall, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Its library houses the oldest collection of books and manuscripts in Switzerland, with pieces dating back to the 8th century. All library books are available for public use, and most recently, a virtual library was created to provide access to the medieval codices of the Abbey Library of St. Gallen. The hall itself, designed in classic Rococo style, is considered to be one of the most beautiful, non-sacred, examples of this style in Switzerland and abroad. Conference participants will have the opportunity to tour the library.

This year's conference includes the following speakers:
* Rafael Ball, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany
* Jens Bammel, International Publishers Association, Geneva, Switzerland
* Herbert Burkert, University of St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland
* Stephanie Jacobs, German Book Museum, Leipzig, Germany
* Lucy Küng, University of Jönköping, Jönköping, Sweden
* Wulf D. von Lucius, Lucius & Lucius Verlag, Stuttgart, Germany
* Eric Merkel-Sobotta, Springer Science+Business Media, Berlin, Germany
* Ernst Tremp, Abbey Library of St. Gallen/University of Freiburg, St. Gallen, Switzerland

For further information on the Book Conference plenary and panel speakers, please see: http://booksandpublishing.com/conference-2010/plenary-speakers/ .

As well as an impressive line-up of plenary speakers, the conference will also include numerous paper, workshop and colloquium presentations by practitioners, teachers and researchers. We would particularly like to invite you to respond to the conference Call-for-Papers. Presenters may choose to submit written papers for publication in The International Journal of the Book. If you are unable to attend the conference in person, virtual registrations are also available which allow you to submit a paper for refereeing and possible publication.

Whether you are a virtual or in-person presenter at the conference, we also encourage you to present on the conference YouTube Channel. Please select the Online Sessions link on the conference website for further details.

The deadline for the next round in the call for papers (a title and short abstract) is 17 June 2010. Future deadlines will be announced on the conference website after this date. Proposals are reviewed within two weeks of submission. Full details of the conference, including an online proposal submission form, are to be found at the conference website - http://www.Book-Conference.com/ .


October 2010Gender & Interdisciplinary Education for Engineers - Paris 2011

Gender and Interdisciplinary Education for Engineers – GIEE 2011
Does Interdisciplinary Education improve the gender balance
and attract more young people in Engineering and Technology higher education?
Les Cordeliers, Conference Centre of the Paris University
Paris (France) –June 23-24th, 2011


Attracting more young people, particularly women, in Engineering and Technology (ET) is a major concern in Europe today. Their participation in engineering occupations appears to be a key-issue for European economic and technical development, as well as a central achievement towards gender equality and social justice. Increasing young people interest in the sciences and mathematics and underlining the importance of Engineering and Technology developments in shaping our collective future is an ongoing project in the education sector. In higher education in Europe, women are overrepresented in the humanities, education, arts, health, welfare, agriculture or veterinary studies, while men opt for science, mathematics and computing. If we look more closely at engineering, manufacturing and construction, 18.5% of males graduate in this area, compared to 6.9% of women.
Two factors may explain these differences of choices:
1- It seems that the attractiveness of ET sectors differs from males to females because of its gendered representation, which is a masculine one.
2- The lack of interdisciplinary content in ET curricula may act as a foil to potential SET students, both men and women. Several previous studies suggest, first, that young people and particularly women, want more interdisciplinarity (such as subjects from the humanities and social sciences) in their engineering degree courses; and second, that many non-engineering students may have considered studying engineering if there had been more subjects from the humanities and social sciences included. A more interdisciplinary approach of ET would stress the social utility of ET and the societal challenges attached to the profession, which is something important in students’ choice.

The GIEE 2011 conference is being organised by the HELENA research project consortium (Higher Education leading to Engineering and Scientific Careers), funded by the EU commission in the frame of the 7th FP. This project collected and analyzed literature and data from higher education engineering programmes across the range of levels of interdisciplinary content in order to answer the question of whether interdisciplinary education has an impact on the gender balance of students in the discipline. Results will be presented during the conference, with the opportunity for open debate with other participants on the research findings.


We invite scholars and specialists of engineering training to contribute to this conference by sending abstracts of no more than 500 words (including methodology and relevant references) online at the following website before 15th October 2010 (see calendar below):
www.fp7-helena.org/conference2011

The Conference will be organized using the following broad structure (detailed content of each theme on www.fp7-helena.org/conference2011 ):
- Theme 1: Teaching and learning Contents and Cultures.
- Theme 2: Students’ experiences.
- Theme 3: Other ways to attract more women.
- Theme 4: Policies.

Possibility of submission of posters

The researchers who wish to present a poster are invited to submit a short description of the poster (one page at the most), using the same form provided on line for the submission of papers, preceding the title by the word “POSTER”. The deadlines are the same as for oral presentations (see below).

Submission of posters on line : www.fp7-helena.org/conference2011

Proceedings will be published; authors of accepted papers will be invited to send a full paper.

Conference languages are English and French

Calendar:
October 15th, 2010: Deadline for abstract submission
End of December 2010: Abstract evaluation by the Scientific Committee
March 15th, 2011: Full paper submission
April 30th, 2011: Final decision by the SC


May 2010Transforming Science & Engineering - now in paperback

Available in paperback - in August

Link to:
Transforming Science and Engineering
Advancing Academic Women
Abigail J. Stewart, Janet E. Malley, and Danielle LaVaque-Manty, Editors
University of Michigan Press
 
Available Paper   
978-0-472-03432-1   
$37.50S   
August 2010


Research and publication productivity

Following is a link to a guest piece on Writing and Tenure by Anne Forsyth, sent by Diana Hicks (SPP Chair), who received it from Jennifer Clark.
  http://planning-research.com/forsyth-on-writing-and-tenure/

The commentary and advice are sound - including 10 Potential Pitfalls for New Scholars, which apply for both new and not new scholars. 


Living Ideas - A Memoir of Berkeley Women's Studies

LIVING IDEAS:  A Memoir of the Tumultuous Founding of Berkeley Women's Studies
by Gloria Bowles

Available at:    www.gloriabowles.net


WHAT READERS ARE SAYING ABOUT LIVING IDEAS:

"I very much enjoyed reading your beautifully written memoir...I 
could not put it down, identifying with so many of your struggles and 
marveling how you endured so many more
establishing Women's Studies....I appreciated the way you 
interspersed your career struggles with that of your love life - a 
struggle most of us contended with...I'm glad you had the courage
to publish LIVING IDEAS, claim your role as the founder of Women's 
Studies and explain why it should have its own department."

"I had to put it down: it took me back to painful years in grad 
school. But I also underlined passages for my daughter."

"LIVING IDEAS goes fearlessly into the emotional and sexual tumult of 
the seventies."

"I appreciate what, and how, you expressed dimensions of women's 
studies and the women's movement: the passion of the times, the 
underlying impetuses of the movement, the deep (and corrosive) 
conflicts ensuing, and both the gains and 'prices paid,' individually 
and collectively."



An Examination of the Tenured Mind (review)

An Examination of the Tenured Mind

Professing to Learn: Creating Tenured Lives and Careers in the American Research University. Anna Neumann. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.

Reviewed by William G. Tierney

Anna Neumann has written a book about the lives of faculty early in their tenured careers at research universities that in some respects follows a path first outlined by Max Weber in "Science as a Vocation." The text is a result of two research projects-one that began in 1993 and a second that ended in 2001. In the first project the author interviewed thirty-eight faculty members at one university, and in the other she interviewed forty individuals at four universities. This is a book that ultimately fails in its attempt to convince me about the lives of early career faculty, but in its failure it succeeds at helping me think about academic work and academic lives.

The author is careful in her explanation of what she set out to do-understand the lives of recently tenured faculty-and equally judicious about whom she did not study. Contingent faculty, community college faculty, new faculty, and a multitude of other groups are important to study, she acknowledges, but with a sample of seventy-eight, the study needed to be narrowly configured. Neumann also points out that she is not particularly interested in organizational contexts and instead focuses on the interior lives of scholars. Although in one of the seven chapters she provides snippets about the institutions in which these scholars work, the author is more interested in what she calls "passionate thought," which she describes as "strivings for honest understanding: for thought that is emotive in its honesty, drawing its creator to it equally for what, in honesty, it is and also what, in substance, it represents." Neumann found faculty members who variously associated passionate thought with the pursuit of beauty or the search for expressive space, with a single or crosscutting area of study, and with individual or shared endeavors. In other words, individuals in multiple fields experience passionate thought in many ways. Neumann concludes that most of those she interviewed "experienced their scholarly learning as being powered by a search for passionate thought."

The author's voice is clear and, well, "passionate" throughout. The tone of the book is like a conversation over coffee. Even so, the text has extensive references, citations, and footnotes that enable the reader to follow the trajectory of the author's thought. This is one of the best-written academic texts I have read in quite some time. Why, then, do I say the book fails?

In a book that is so particular, so rich with quotations, I came away disappointed that the contexts in which we live and work were fused together as if we all think and act alike. The book, for example, allowed me to reflect on my own academic life. Pennsylvania State University, where I began my academic career, and the University of Southern California, where I am now, are vastly different research universities. The institutions-my colleagues, the environment, the culture of the places-have shaped how I approach academic life, yet we do not get much sense of such differences in Neumann's book. It is as if passionate thought occurs in similar fashion in all places, and that has certainly not been my experience.

I might have passionate thoughts as Neumann describes them, but they also are shaped by my own identity as a gay man. My scholarship is not shaped simply by the texts I read and write and the research I conduct; I am inevitably framed by who I am as an individual. Although Neumann refers to how children or family are also valued by these academics, we do not get a sense of how one particular value shapes, distorts, collides with the others. One participant, for example, says, in relation to the place of scholarly work in her life, "It's one of four or five things that I value." When asked what else she values, she states, "My children, my broader family . . . community things . . . and it may sound silly, but I exercise a lot. . . . Fitness is very important to me." Passionate thought, to me, cannot be cordoned off from the rest of my life. Fitness is important to me, too, but when I am hiking in the Pecos Wilderness I also am thinking through particular problems I have in writing, or with a text I have read, or with a project I might do.

The author also makes it appear as if research universities are cocoons in which everyone walks around in reveries of passionate thought. Neumann interviewed about ten faculty members on each campus, but on my own campus we have a few thousand faculty members. I do not see much reverie. Sure, I see remarkable men and women, and I know some of the types of individuals about whom Neumann writes, but I also know folks who simply take faculty life as a job and are not consumed by passionate thought, or individuals who are more campus politicians than thinkers, and even a few who are neither politicians nor thinkers. Some of us also think of our passion as more concerned with praxis, but these differences do not come through in the book.

I also know that my life is remarkably different today from what it was in 1993, and it is not simply that I have more gray hair. We have seen significant changes in academic work over that time, and the expectations for the just-tenured associate professors of 1993 were vastly different from the expectations for their counterparts in 2010. Neumann does not delve into these differences, so she has us assume that the institution of yesterday is akin to that of today. Where she sees similarities, I see disruptions. The pressure to generate external funding, to communicate with new audiences, and to utilize new technologies-to name just a few tasks-are different demands from what was expected of us seventeen years ago. Do we even have time for passionate thought anymore?

And that question is why this book ultimately succeeds. Although I have significant quarrels with the premises and findings in her book, Neumann has written a passionate text. She asks us to think about what matters to us-and what should matter. She contends that academic work is a calling, or a vocation, as Weber said so long ago. We are committed to the life of the mind, and our commitments get played out and defined in manifold ways. Any text that is so elegantly written on such an important topic deserves a careful reading even if we end up disagreeing with one or another point.
---------------------------------------

William G. Tierney is University Professor and Wilbur-Kieffer Professor of Higher Education at the University of Southern California and director of the Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis. His e-mail address is wgtiern@usc.edu, and his blog is www.21stcenturyscholars.org.
Comment on this book review by writing to academe@aaup.org.
Note: Comments are reviewed prior to posting and will not appear on this page immediately.


January 2010Postdoc - International Center for Research on Women

International Center for Research on Women

ICRW is offering a post-doctoral fellowship for a social scientist with
gender and population expertise at its Washington, DC office. This fellowship is geared toward early career Ph.D. professionals who would like to conduct research within an action research organization and network with a wide range of experts on gender, population and development.

The fellow will work directly with the Vice President for Research, Innovation, and Impact and other DC-based research staff at ICRW who focus on international gender and population issues, as well as with experts in this area from other organizations and academic institutions.  The fellow will make substantive contributions to a research project examining the
impact of fertility decline on women's empowerment in developing countries
and participate in ICRW's program and policy-oriented research on adolescents.

Work Focus:
Collaborate with colleagues on research papers (including methodology development, data gathering, analysis, synthesis, and writing) examining the impact of fertility declines and family planning access on women's empowerment and gender relations in developing countries.
Co-author at least one chapter of an edited volume on the impact of fertility declines and family planning access on women's empowerment.
Participate in a network of experts on gender and population, serving as a
core member of the ICRW team convening and strengthening the network.
Participate in other program and policy relevant research on gender and
population issues at ICRW, especially with a focus on adolescents, including the link between girls' education and reproductive health outcomes as well as the assessment of programs aimed at delaying marriage and childbearing.
Participate in proposal writing and development of new work.

Eligibility: Applicants must have a recent or forthcoming Ph.D. in the
social sciences, public health, public policy, or a related discipline with training in gender and in demography/population studies.

Desired Skills and Abilities:
High degree of initiative and proactive responsibility, with the ability to work independently or with minimal direct supervision.
Substantive background in gender, population, and social science issues and research.
Strong analytical and conceptual skills.
Strong interest in linking research with policies and program practice.
Excellent written, verbal communication and presentation abilities.
Strong quantitative and qualitative research skills.
Ability to work collaboratively with colleagues from diverse backgrounds.
Interest in and comfort level with networking activities.
Fluency in English. Proficiency in additional languages a plus.

Duration: The term of the fellowship is one year, expendable to two years with mutual consent. The fellowship is a full-time commitment.
Terms: The fellowship award consists of an annual stipend, health insurance,
and annual leave. The fellow is responsible for all local accommodations
and living costs. The Fellow will be provided with space in ICRW's office
in Washington DC, and will have access to office support. Travel for fellowship related research activities and limited conference travel will also be supported.

Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest summarizing their
background and interest in the field of gender and population, curriculum
vitae, and two writing samples to jobs@icrw.org with "Gender and
Population Post-Doc Fellowship" in the subject line.
Screening of applicants will continue until the position is filled.


November 2009Articles/books - "stages" toward publication

From. W. Belcher,
Flourish: A Free Electronic Newsletter for Scholarly Writers
December 2009                                         vol. 5, no. 10
 

The Woodrow Wilson Foundation provides guidelines on listing as-yet-to-be published articles and books on your curriculum vitae. Here it is, verbatim. I’m not sure “under contract” works for articles as well.

-In progress (still being written, not submitted for publication yet)

-Under review (submitted to a journal or press)

-Revising to resubmit (submitted to a journal or press and returned for revision)

-Under contract (manuscript has been accepted by a press but may be undergoing revisions before final publication)

-In press (manuscript finished, submitted to a journal or press and awaiting publication


September 2009WST Student-Faculty Research Partnerships

WST continues the very successful initiative supporting GT faculty research partnerships with undergraduate students in research on gender, science, and technology, providing hourly funding for undergraduate research assistants. This is GT's first --inaugural-- undergraduate student-faculty research program.

In this way, WST continues to engage students and faculty in active and cooperative learning outside as well as inside the classroom.

If you are interested in undertaking a WST student-faculty partnership during Fall 2009, please send an application *as soon as possible* with the following information to

(1) Name of student -- and student's major area of study, email, and phone; and whether student has previously worked at GT (which is for accounting purposes)
(2) Faculty supervisor
(3) Description of the project for partnership
(4) Proposed number of hours a week for student in partnership (10-15/wk is usual)
(5) Proposed period for the partnership (that is, particular months during Fall 2009)
(6) Proposed rate of pay ($9.00 - 11.00/hr. - depending upon the experience of the student)


August 2009'Revise-and-Resubmit' - Perspective

Here is a --not necessarily intuitive-- perspective on/approach to "Revised and Resubmitted" articles -- from Wendy Belcher's Newsletter, Flourish.
with good wishes - Mary

Editor: Wendy Belcher
Flourish

A Free Electronic Newsletter for Scholarly Writers

August 2009 vol. 5, no.7

A Flourish reader sent in the following story about her graduate student. The student received a revise and resubmit notice from a prestigious peer-reviewed journal. He followed all the suggestions and significantly revised the piece. When the editor received the revision, however, the editor felt it was a brand new piece and sent it out to new reviewers. Those second reviewers then rejected the article!

What’s the lesson here? On the one hand, if the student did exactly what he felt needed to be done to the article, then he did the right thing and should chalk up this experience to the subjectivity of peer reviewing. He should move on to another journal and try again. On the other hand, if the student did everything the peer reviewers suggested even though he felt they were sometimes wrong or if he made radical changes not recommended by the peer reviewers, he did the wrong thing. As his professor writes, “tell your readers, ‘Do not overdo it! Do exactly what they tell you to do and no more!’” Any article can be improved in dozens of ways at this late stage your job is to improve it as the journal sees fit.

As I’ve written before, editors do not expect you to do everything the reviewers tell you to do and even the reviewers do not expect you to overhaul the piece. If they did, they would have rejected it. So, if they tell you to do a more thorough literature review and you expand that section of your article from two pages to six, you are probably doing too much. If they disagree with how you articulated part of your argument, you may solve it by making one of the reviewers’ recommended changes to the argument, not all of them. That is, peer reviewers can fire away at a target from several angles, saying you should change x, y, and z, but once you’ve changed x, then y and z are fine.

I don’t want to recommend that scholars avoid revising their work thoroughly. Revision is key to good work. But once you’ve got a revise and resubmit notice, stay focused. This is the stage for needlework, not hacking.


International Conference on the Book, 16-18 October 2009, University of Edinburgh

SEVENTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE BOOK
The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
16-18 October 2009
http://book-conference.com

The Book Conference serves as an inclusive forum for examining the past, current and future role of the book. It proceeds from recognition that although the book is an old medium of expression, it embodies thousands of years' experience of recording knowledge. The pervasive influence of this experience continues to shape newer forms of information technology, while at the same time providing a reference point for innovation.

The Book Conference not only considers the book and other information technologies as artefacts or discrete objects, it also examines other key aspects of the information society, including publishing, libraries, information systems, literacy and education. Broadly speaking, the Conference engages the interrelation between changes in thought, creation, production and distribution, and the role and meaning of the book and other information technologies. The Book Conference welcomes a wide range of participants from the world of books including authors, publishers, printers, librarians, IT specialists, book retailers, editors, literacy educators, and academic researchers and scholars from all disciplinary traditions.

The Conference includes plenary presentations by accomplished researchers, scholars and practitioners, as well as numerous paper, workshop and colloquium presentations. Presenters may choose to submit written papers for publication in The International Journal of the Book. If you are unable to attend the Conference in person, virtual registrations are also available which allow you to submit a paper for refereeing and possible publication in this fully refereed academic Journal.

Whether you are a virtual or in-person presenter at this Conference, we also encourage you to present on the Conference YouTube Channel. Please select the Online Sessions link on the Conference website for further details.

The deadline for the next round in the call for papers (a title and short abstract) is 20 August 2009. Future deadlines will be announced on the Conference website after this date. Full details of the Conference, including an online proposal submission form, are to be found at the Conference website - http://book-conference.com


July 2009Increasing the impact of one's research

An interesting commentary on Increasing the Scientific Impact of one's research:
http://pespmc1.vub.ac.be:8000/ECCO-web/29


June 2009Fulbright Scholar Program for US Faculty and Professionals

Fulbright Scholar Program for US Faculty and Professionals The Fulbright Scholar Program offers grants in more than 125 countries around the world. Every year the Traditional Fulbright Scholar Program sends approximately 800 US scholars and professionals overseas to teach, research or do a combination of both. Scholars and professionals in
sociology can find opportunities in their field or in one of the many "All Discipline" awards open to all fields.

The application deadline is August 1. U.S. citizenship is required. For a full listing of all Fulbright programs and other eligibility requirements, please visit our website at www.cies.org or write to
scholars@cies.iie.org.

From March to August 1, 2009, U.S. faculty and professionals are invited to apply for *Fulbright scholar grants at www.cies.org. For monthly updates, write us at outreach@cies.iie.org for a complimentary subscription to The Fulbright Scholar News, an electronic
newsletter.

*The Fulbright Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, is the U.S. government's flagship international exchange program and is supported by the people of the United States and partner countries around the world. Since 1946, the Fulbright Program has provided more than 286,000 participants from over 155 countries with the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, to exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to
shared international concerns. For more information,: http://fulbright.state.gov/.


May 2009Engaged Scholarship in Theory and Practice: Webinar

Engaged Scholarship in Theory and Practice
Thursday, May 14 at 4:00 PM
(Duration:75 minutes)

Presenter: Irma McClaurin
Moderator: Allison Kimmich

About the Webinar:
Engaged scholarship has become a buzzword on many campuses. What does it really mean and what are its implications for our field, which has been practicing engaged scholarship in some form since its inception?

In this webinar we will go deeper to explore some of the reasons to practice engaged scholarship, some ways to be an engaged scholar, and finally some of the professional pitfalls that may accompany seeking a wider audience for your research.

Participants will learn:
How to define engaged scholarship and discuss it in multiple campus and community settings
How to develop an "engaged" research agenda
Tips for translating academic research for wider "publics"
How to balance engaged scholarship with tenure and promotion requirements
Who should participate?

WS faculty at all career stages who want to develop or deepen their understanding of engaged scholarship

Program administrators who will evaluate engaged scholarship as part of the tenure and promotion process

Women's center directors, staff, and women's studies faculty who develop programs that are "open to the public."


Post Doc Position - Women & Work

THE CENTER FOR WOMEN AND WORK HAS AN IMMEDIATE OPENING FOR A POST-DOCTORAL RESEARCHER

The Center for Women and Work (CWW) at Rutgers has an opening starting July 1, 2009 for a Post-Doctoral Associate in gender and workforce policy, contingent on grant funding. (1 year position, possibility of reappointment for 2nd year). Salary is $40,000 (with full benefits). Interested candidates should send a cover letter and CV to Dr. Mary Gatta, c/o Carla LoMeo (clomeo@smlr.rutgers.edu), or fax 732-932-1254. We will begin to review applications May 15th and applications received after May 31st cannot be assured full consideration.


April 2009Men Outearn Women in Almost All Occupations

Men Outearn Women in Almost All Occupations

A new analysis released by the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) today on Equal Pay Day shows that men out-earn women in nearly every occupation for which data are available.

Of the more than 500 occupational categories for which sufficient data are provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in only 5 occupations do women earn the same or more than men.

Men earn more than women even in jobs that are most common among women, such as
Administrative assistants: women earn only 83.4 cents for a man's dollar
Elementary and middle school teachers: women earn 87.6 cents for a man's dollar
Registered nurses: women earn 87.4 cents for a man's dollar

Men and women still tend to be concentrated in very different jobs, with the most common jobs among women paying less than the most common jobs held by men. For example, the highest paying of the ten most common occupations for women, 'Registered Nurses,' pays $1,011 in median weekly earnings, whereas the highest paying of men's top ten most common jobs is 'Managers, all other,' which pays $1,359 per week. The lowest paying of the most common jobs for women is 'Cashier' at $349 per week, whereas the lowest paying most common job for men is 'Cook' at $404 per week.

Ariane Hegewisch, Study Director at the Institute for Women's Policy Research, says, "Women tend to be in the minority of workers in the occupations with the highest earnings. We need to ensure that women are fully informed about the earnings potential of an occupation before they choose their careers."

The analysis uses data from the Bureau of Labor statistics from 2008.

IWPR Director of Research Dr. Barbara Gault notes, "The data paint a clear picture of a workforce that remains strongly divided on the basis of sex -- with women landing in the worst jobs our labor market has to offer, and earning less than men even in the exact same jobs. Our economy can only thrive when opportunities are equally available regardless of gender or race."

To view the Fact Sheet, see www.iwpr.org/pdf/C350a.pdf


March 2009Invitation to WST Research Panel/Lunch--International Higher Educ

CENTER FOR STUDY OF WOMEN, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOLOGY (WST)
RESEARCH PANEL/DISCUSSION AND LUNCH
"Women and International Dimensions of Higher Education"

Tuesday, March 24
12 Noon
Student Success Center, President's Suite C

Vicki Birchfield
Associate Professor, Sam Nunn School of International Affairs
Director, European Union Center for Excellence
"Higher Education and the European Union"

Ruby Heap
Professor, Department of History
and Associate Vice President- Research, University of Ottawa
Fulbright Scholar/visitor
"The Canada Research Chairs Program and the Barriers to Gender Equity in University Research"

Mary Lynn Realff
Associate Professor, Polymer, Fiber, and Textile Engineering
WST Co-director
"Women's International Research Engineering Summit (WIRES)"


February 2009ADVANCE Career Coaching Event - Save the Date

Many Georgia Tech faculty members seek mentoring/coaching as they think about promotion/tenure and continued advancement.

A Career Coaching Event, sponsored by the ADVANCE Team -- ADVANCE Professors, Faculty Career Development Services, and the Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology -- will be held:

Tuesday/March 3, 2009
1:00 - 3:00 pm
Klaus Building, Large Conference Room 116

Each faculty member seeking coaching brings a draft of her/his C.V. and summary statement. "Coaches" from the GT faculty will be available for brief one-on-one sessions -- and those seeking coaching can obtain career feed-back from a number of coaches during the time-span of the event.

The ADVANCE Team will be present to answer questions about GT policies/practices, including Promotion and Tenure, and Active Service Modified Duties.


January 2009Panel: "Research, Teams, and Collaboration"

IAC - ADVANCE LUNCH/DISCUSSION
"Research, Teams, and Collaboration"
Panel and Discussion with:

Susan Cozzens
Professor, Public Policy
Associate Dean for Research, Ivan Allen College

Mary Frank Fox
Advance Professor, Public Policy

Sue Rosser
Dean, Ivan Allen College

WEDNESDAY, 21 JANUARY 2009
12 noon - 1:30 pm
Student Success Center, President's Suite C


November 2008Sloan Grants for Research on S/E Workforce

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is pleased to announce the second round of its small grants program to support creative research on the U.S. workforce and labor markets in science and engineering (S&E). The due date for submissions will be November 17, 2008.

In the second round of this research competition, the Foundation wishes especially to encourage proposals that focus on the complex nexus between the U.S. science and engineering workforce and international migration.

Depending on the number and quality of proposals received, the second round of this grant program will provide up to six research awards. Awardees will be selected on the basis of recommendations by a peer review committee of leading researchers. Projects of up to two years in length will be considered. Proposed budgets requested cannot exceed a total of $45,000, though we expect that most successful submissions will be smaller than this ceiling. No overhead or indirect cost deductions can be allowed; requested funds should be allocated entirely to the proposed research efforts.

We understand that grants of this size will not be sufficient to support substantial levels of original data collection. However, we encourage applicants to consider creative ways to make use of existing datasets such as those produced by the National Science Foundation, as well as of new and very large datasets emerging from the American Community Survey and the New Immigrant Survey.

Eligibility

Grants can be made only to U.S. institutions of higher education and research that are eligible for Foundation grants. An appropriate officer of the institution must indicate its willingness to receive and administer the proposed grant.

Grant applicants must be faculty members or other regular employees of the eligible institution.

Application procedures:

Proposals may be submitted via regular mail or as email and attachments, by the program deadlines (see below).

Proposals must not exceed 20 pages double-spaced. Appendices with additional information may be attached if so wished.

The proposal should include, on the first page, a brief abstract of 100 words or less.

In addition, please attach:
- a brief (1-2 page) curriculum vitae for the researcher(s)
- a simple line-item budget of proposed expenditures.

Term and budget of proposed grants:

The term of proposed projects should be two years or less. These are intended to be small research grants; in no case should the total budget for the requested term exceed $45,000, and we expect that the amounts requested by most successful submissions will be smaller than that limit. The proposal should include a simple line-item budget justifying the funding items requested, and confirming that no indirect costs or overhead charges will be applied by the institution.

The submission deadline for the second round of this grants program is:

November 17, 2008

Submissions and inquiries should be addressed to:
Michael S. Teitelbaum
Vice President
Research Awards on the U.S. Science and Engineering Workforce
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
630 Fifth Avenue, Suite 2550
New York, NY 10111
Teitelbaum@sloan.org


October 2008 The International Conference on the Book, 25-27 October 2008

Dear Colleague,

On behalf of the Conference Organising Committee, we would like to inform you of the:

SIXTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON THE BOOK
The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., USA
25-27 October 2008
http://www.Book-Conference.com

This conference serves as an inclusive forum for examining the past, current and future role of the book. It proceeds from recognition that although the book is an old medium of expression, it embodies thousands of years' experience of recording knowledge. The pervasive influence of this experience continues to shape newer forms of information technology, while at the same time providing a reference point for innovation.

The Book Conference not only considers the book and other information technologies as artefacts or discrete objects, it also examines other key aspects of the information society, including publishing, libraries, information systems, literacy, and education. Broadly speaking, the Conference engages the interrelation between changes in thought, creation, production and distribution, and the role and meaning of the book and other information technologies.

The Book Conference welcomes a wide range of participants from the world of books - authors, publishers, printers, librarians, IT specialists, book retailers, editors, literacy educators, and academic researchers and scholars from all disciplinary traditions.

Plenary speakers include:
* John Willinsky (Stanford University, Stanford, USA)
* Michael Peters (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA)
* Rosamund Davies (University of Greenwich, London, UK)

In addition, the Conference will also include numerous paper, workshop and colloquium presentations by practitioners, teachers and researchers. We would particularly like to invite you to respond to the Conference Call-for-Papers. Presenters may choose to submit written papers for publication in the fully refereed International Journal of the Book. If you are unable to attend the Conference in person, virtual registrations are also available which allow you to submit a paper for refereeing and possible publication in this fully refereed academic Journal.

The deadline for the next round in the call for papers (a title and short abstract) is 11 September 2008. Future deadlines will be announced on the Conference website after this date. Proposals are reviewed within two weeks of submission. Full details of the Conference, including an online proposal submission form, are to be found at the Conference website - http://www.Book-Conference.com

We look forward to receiving your proposals and hope you will be able to join us in Washington, D.C. in October 2008.

Yours sincerely,

Garett Gietzen
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA
For the Advisory Board, International Conference on the Book and International Journal of the Book


September 2008EQ-UNI: Fwd: Call for papers about Gender and Diversity in Engineering - REMINDER

Dear colleagues and friends,

Its a great pleasure for me to present you again the "1st European VDI-Conference on Gender and Diversity in Engineering and Science" with a Call for Papers which adresses nearly all current aspects of the topic: www.fib-conference2009.de http://www.fib-conference2009.de>.

Deadline for the abstracts: 30th of september 2008.

Also I want to attract your interest to a call about "Diversity in Engineering Education", one of the next special issues of the European Journal for Engineering Education of SEFI, the European Association of Engineering Education.

Deadline for abstracts: 30th of november 2008.

It would be a great help if you could inform your networks and colleagues about both announcements.

We are looking forward to your papers!

Susanne Ihsen
----------------
Prof. Dr. Susanne Ihsen
Technische Universität München
Gender Studies in Ingenieurwissenschaften
Theresienstr. 90
80290 Muenchen
Tel.: +49-89-289 22936
Fax: +49-89-289 22938
ihsen@tum.de


- Workshop - Human Resource Data to Study S/E Workforce

Using Human Resource Data from Science Resources Statistics
To Study the Science and Engineering Workforce
National Science Foundation Workshop

September 22nd, 2008
NSF, Arlington, VA


Purpose of Workshop: The United States collects extraordinarily high-quality data on the science and engineering workforce. A key component is the SESTAT data http://sestat.nsf.gov/ collected by the National Science Foundation, Science Resources Statistics (SRS), which integrates three databases: The National Survey of College Graduates (NSCG), The National Survey of Recent College Graduates (NSRCG), and the Survey of Doctorate Recipients (SDR). The sampling frame for the latter, the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), is also overseen by SRS.

The September 22nd workshop will bring together users and potential users of SRS restricted data.* The goals of the workshop are threefold:

-Exchange information among users concerning creative uses of the data and research outcomes.

-Broaden the base of users by familiarizing potential users with the data that is available, ways in which the data is currently being used and the possibility for other kinds of use.

-Provide feedback to SRS regarding the data and possible ways to enhance both the data and its use.

The workshop is funded by a grant from SRS, NSF. Support has also been provided from the Science and Engineering Workforce Project, NBER, which is funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Call for Proposals

Current Users who wish to be considered for participation should submit a two- page abstract and/or draft of a paper to ecokrwx@langate.gsu.edu by May 30, 2008. The abstract must include a discussion of the data used in the research. Full papers for those selected will be due by September 1st.

Potential Users who wish to be considered for participation should submit a two- page narrative to ecokrwx@langate.gsu.edu by May 30, 2008 indicating the research question they would address if they were to gain access to the data. Revised narratives are due by September 1st.

Selection will be made by a three-member advisory committee. Applicants will be notified of the committee?s decision by July 18th.

Deadlines: May 30th for consideration; September 1st for completion of selected papers by users and revision of selected narratives by potential users.

Financial Arrangements: Users selected for participation will receive a stipend of $1200; potential users will receive a stipend of $1000. Participants are responsible for making their own travel arrangements and paying for their travel, accommodations and meals, with the exception of breakfast and lunch at the conference. A block of rooms will be held at a local hotel for the evening of September 21st. Individuals are required to attend the workshop in order to receive the stipend. To keep the schedule on time, we will use a system of penalties: $25 per business day for missing the September 1st deadline.

Number of participants: A maximum of 12 users and 10 potential users will be selected for attendance.

Format of Workshop: Current users will each have 15 minutes to summarize their work; potential users will each make a short presentation concerning the research question they would address if they were to gain access to the data.

Hours: The workshop will commence at 8:00 a.m., September 22nd and end at 4:30 p.m.

Questions? E-mail Paula Stephan (pstephan@gsu.edu).

*Procedures for applying for a restricted use license are available at http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/license/start.cfm.


August 2008WST Center fall 2008 events

GEORGIA TECH CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF WOMEN, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOLOGY
www.wst.gatech.edu
FALL 2008 WST CENTER EVENTS: open to all, refreshments served, RSVP to wst.lrn.c@gmail.com.

Wednesday, September 10, 2008: Annual Reception cosponsored by the Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology; Women in Engineering, and the Women’s Resource Center. 3:30-5 pm. Klaus Atrium.

Thursday, September 25, 2008: Doris Derby, Women Leaders in the Civil Rights Movement. 4pm. Clary Theatre, Success Center. Reception following. (In conjunction with High Museum exhibit “Road to Freedom”)

Upcoming in Spring: Carolyn Merchant, WST Distinguished Lecturer, Tuesday, February 24, 2009, 4 pm,
Clary Theatre, Success Center. Reception following.

WOMEN, SCIENCE, AND TECHNOLOGY LEARNING COMMUNITY
The Women, Science, and Technology Learning Community (WST Lrn C) is an innovative joint venture of the Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology (WST Center) and the Georgia Tech Department of Housing. Connecting students and faculty, the WST Lrn C offers programs addressing personal and professional issues for women students entering scientific and technological fields. Female undergraduates from any major interested in the programs of the WST Center are eligible to apply in spring for housing in the WST Lrn C. In 2008-09 the WST Lrn C includes 48 students living in Stein and Goldin Houses, located in 4th St. Apartments A and B, and 4 in Center St. Apartments who attend monthly dinners, bi-weekly lunches, and campus receptions and research panels. WST Lrn C residents also benefit from having a faculty mentor. ALL Georgia Tech students are welcome to attend WST and WST Learning Community events
FALL 2008 WST Learning Community Events

Friday, August 15, 1-4pm. Orientation with WST Co-Directors, Graduate Partners, CAs and guest presenters. Stein Study Lounge.
Wednesday, August 27, 11:30am-1pm, Lunch with Mary Frank Fox. Student Center, Crescent Room.

DINNERS: All WST Learning Community dinners take place in Stein House study lounge, 4th St. Apartments. They are open to all Georgia Tech students and WST mentors. Please RSVP to wst.lrn.c@gmail.com.
Monday, September 8, 6pm—Karen Harwell, Director, Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program
Tuesday, October 7, 6pm—Yvette Upton and Colleen Riggle, Women’s Resource Center
Tuesday, October 28, 6 pm-Kimberly Rieck, GT Alumna and Former WST Learning Community CA
For information about biweekly lunches, contact Lisa Linhardt or see www.wst.gatech.edu (click under WST Learning Community). Each lunch brings together in informal discussion a small number of students and a faculty or staff member host. Thanks to the Department of Housing for funding these lunches!


Postdoc Opportunity

The Center for the Study of Social Stratification and Inequality

Graduate School of Arts and Letters, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

http://www.sal.tohoku.ac.jp/coe/index-en.html



The Center for the Study of Social Stratification and Inequality (CSSI) invites applications from excellent scholars for five postdoctoral positions. The center pursues development of new theories and methodologies on social stratification and inequality with emphasis on studies of rational choice theory, minorities (including gender stratification and inequality), East Asia, transnational migration (especially focusing on “newcomers” in Japan), and fairness. Faculty members of the center are sociologists, social psychologists, cultural anthropologists, religious anthropologists, a historian, and economists, and they study social stratification and inequality from various viewpoints. In addition, the CSSI conducts comparative studies of absolute poverty with the Stanford Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality.


Applicants should hold doctoral degrees or show academic performance equivalent to holders of doctoral degrees. They should have a good command of English. Postdoctoral fellows of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science are not eligible for this application.


The successful candidates will be expected to work under the supervision of the faculty members of the center for a 6-month period from October 1, 2008. (The date is negotiable.) Though the initial contract is 6 months period, the contract will be extended for one more year. The salary of a successful candidate will be 270,000 – 350,000 yen per month depending on his/her academic career. Travel and housing allowances will be paid to those who are eligible for them. Grants for excellent research projects proposed by the successful candidates will be provided. The center also academically and financially supports their presentations at international conferences.


Applicants should send a curriculum vitae, a list of their presentations and publications, a research plan at the CSSI (less than 1,500 words), each copy of three major publications at most, and a letter of reference to:


Dr. Yoshimichi Sato, Director

Center for the Study of Social Stratification and Inequality

Graduate School of Arts and Letters, Tohoku University

27-1, Kawauchi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8576 JAPAN

Phone: +81-22-795-6036 Fax: +81-22-795-5972
The deadline for completed applications is August 15, 2008.

All inquiries concerning the application should be addressed to Yoshimichi Sato at ysato@sal.tohoku.ac.jp


from Judith Lewis Herman

Every year, someone asks for the original of 'Atrocities and Silence'

Here it is:

" . . After every atrocity, one can expect to hear the same predictable apologies:
it never happened; the victim lies; the victim exaggerates; the victim brought it upon herself;
and in any case, it is time to forget the past and move on."

-Judith Lewis Herman, M, D.


Women and Power? - call for papers

University of South Dakota
Women’s Research, Scholarship, & Creative Activity Conference

“Women and Power”
October 3-4, 2008

(Proposal due date: August 1, 2008)

The University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD, invites proposals for its 2008 Women’s Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity Conference.
The 2008 conference will feature scholarly and creative work that treats questions of power in relation to women: the experiences, creations, theories, and practices of power that define and are defined by women as actors, objects, and modes of performance and being in the world. The conference, among other things, aims to provoke discussion about women in positions of power, the vexatious roads they travel to get there, the barriers they meet, defeat, or submit to along the way, and the humorous, sad, and/or inspiring visions that arise from women’s engagement with powers of all kinds—including the powers they possess themselves.

This year’s conference will culminate in the publication of selected scholarly papers and creative works in a special conference issue of The South Dakota Review.

We solicit proposals for research presentations, scholarly papers, roundtable discussions, brief dramatic performances, film viewings, and creative readings on any topic that treats the diverse intertwinings of women and power.

We anticipate papers that address the following topic areas and are glad to consider others:

--women, power, and literature and language
--women, power, and history
--women, power, and the economy
--women, power, and politics
--women, power, and activism
--women, power, and sexuality
--women, power, and popular culture
--women, power, and the fine arts
--women, power, and society
--women, power, and justice
--women, power, and ecology
--women, power, and the digital age
--women, power, and medicine
--women, power, and religion
--women, power, and the global community
--women, power, and peace, war, & the military

Please upload your electronic proposal at www.usd.edu/wmst/ , e-mail 250-word abstracts to aemerson@usd.edu, or send a hard copy to the following address by August 1, 2008.


July 2008Equal Rites, Unequal Outcomes: Women in American Research Universities

Re-issued: Equal Rites, Unequal Outcomes: Women in American Research Universities (Innovations in Science, Education, and Technology)
by Lilli S. Hornig (Editor)
Springer, 2008
at: http://www.amazon.com/Equal-Rites-Unequal-Outcomes-Universities/dp/0306473518/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1217335064&sr=1-1


Product Description
This book is based on a conference held at Harvard University in November 1998. It is sponsored by grants from the Ford Foundation, the Sloan Foundation, and the Albert Gordon Foundation. The intent of the conference is to focus on women faculty in research universities, seeking to identify and disseminate innovative approaches to increasing faculty positions and opportunities for women there. Faculty positions in these institutions are essential to establishing productive scholarly careers, especially so in the natural sciences, but also in the social sciences and humanities. The contributors are considered quite stellar and are some of the most important leaders in their individual fields of study.


June 2008The Raise Project -- Increasing the Status of

At a meeting this spring between STEM and medical organizations and societies related to women and minorities, I learned about this effort related to women in STEM and medicine .

http://www.raiseproject.org/about.php

The RAISE project is designed to increase the status of professional
women through enhanced Recognition of the Achievements of Women In
Science, Medicine, and Engineering. Current programs of The RAISE
Project include a national awards clearinghouse with a web-based list of
national awards, a web-based list of women candidates, and preparation
of nominations of outstanding women for selected national awards.


Gender differences in math

The most recent issue of the American Association for the Advancement of Science's journal SCIENCE (vol. 320. no. 5880, May 30) includes an article: "Culture, Gender, and Math," by Luigi Guiso, Ferdinando Monte, Paola Sapienza, & Luigi Zingales.

The article begins:[begin excerpt]

The existence (1), degree (2), and origin (3, 4) of a gender gap (difference between girls' and boys' scores) in mathematics are highly debated. Biologically based explanations for the gap rely on evidence that men
perform better in spatial tests, whereas women do better in verbal recall
ones (1, 5, 6). However, the performance differences are small, and their
link with math test performance is tenuous (7). By contrast, social
conditioning and gender-biased environments can have very large effects on test performance (8).

To assess the relative importance of biological and cultural explanations,
we studied gender differences in test performance across countries (9).
Cultural inequalities range widely across countries (10), whereas results
from cognitive tests do not (6). We used data from the 2003 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) that reports on 276,165 15-year-old students from 40 countries who took identical tests in mathematics and reading (11, 12). The tests were designed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to be free of cultural biases. They are sufficiently challenging that only 0.6% of the U.S. students tested perform at the 99th percentile of the world distribution.

Girls' math scores average 10.5 lower than those of boys (2% less than the
mean average score for boys), but the results vary by country (see chart,
above): in Turkey, -22.6, whereas, in Iceland, 14.5. A similar variation
exists in the proportion of girls over boys who score above 95%, or 99% of
the country-level distribution (fig. S2A).

The gender gap is reversed in reading. On average, girls have reading scores
that are 32.7 higher than those of boys (6.6% higher than the mean average
score for boys), in Turkey, 25.1 higher and in Iceland, 61.0 higher (see
chart). The effect is even stronger in the right tail of the distribution.
In spite of the difference in levels, the gender gap in reading exhibits a
variation across countries similar to the gender gap in math. Where girls
enjoy the strongest advantage in reading with respect to boys, they exhibit
the smallest disadvantage (sometime even an advantage) in math. [The
correlation between the average gender gaps in mathematics and reading
across countries is 0.59 (fig. S4)].

To explore the cultural inputs to these results, we classified countries
according to several measures of gender equality. (i) The World Economic
Forum's Gender Gap Index (GGI) (10) reflects economic and political
opportunities, education, and well-being for women (see chart). (ii)
>From the World Values Surveys (WVSs) (13), we constructed an index of
cultural attitudes toward women based on the average level of disagreement
to such statements as: "When jobs are scarce, men should have more right to
a job than women." (iii) The rate of female economic activity reflects the
percentage of women age 15 and older who supply, or are available to supply,
labor for the production of goods and services. (iv) The political
empowerment index computed by the World Economic Forum (8) measures women's
political participation, which is less dependent on math skills than labor
force participation. These four measures are highly correlated (table S2).

[end excerpt]

Here's another excerpt: "These results suggest that the gender gap in math,
although it historically favors boys, disappears in more gender- equal
societies. The same cannot be said for how boys score in mathematics
compared with how boys score in readings. Boys' scores are always higher in
mathematics than in reading, and although the difference between boys' math
and boys' reading scores varies across countries, it is not correlated with
the GGI index or with any of the other three measures of gender equality
(table S7A). Hence, in countries with a higher GGI index, girls close the
gender gap by becoming better in both math and reading, not by closing the
math gap alone. The gender gap in reading, which favors girls and is
apparent in all countries, thus expands in more gender-equal societies.
Similarly, although the gender gaps in all math subfields decrease in
societies with more gender equality, the difference between the gender gap
in geometry (where the boys' advantage relative to the girls' is the
biggest) and arithmetic (where the boys' advantage relative to the girls' is
the smallest) does not (table S7B)."

The article ends: "This evidence suggests that intra-gender
performance differences in reading versus mathematics and in arithmetic
versus geometry are not eliminated in a more gender-equal culture. By
contrast, girls' underperformance in math relative to boys is eliminated in
more gender-equal cultures. In more gender-equal societies, girls perform as
well as boys in mathematics and much better than them in reading. These
findings shed some light on recent trends in girls'
educational achievements in the United States, where the math gender gap has
been closing over time (2)."

The author note states that reprint requests may be sent to Sapienza@northwestern.edu>.


May 2008Call for Literature: NSF Synthesis Project on Women of Color in STEM

Dr. Gary Orfield and I (Mia Ong) recently received a research grant from the National Science Foundation to systematically identify and synthesize literature on women of color in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). We wanted to reach out to your organization to ask for help in finding potential resources that would contribute to our goal. We are looking for quantitative or qualitative studies, narratives, or biographies. We are conducting a thorough electronic database search, but you and your colleagues may know of "hidden gems" that are not easily available. We would greatly appreciate any references or names of authors of unpublished or published work that meet the general selection criteria listed below - on women of color in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics:


1. Literature pertaining to the production of women of color scientists, specifically, U.S.-born women who are African Americans, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, Latinas/Chicanas, Alaska Natives, and Native Americans in higher education and/or career trajectories in STEM fields;

2. Literature produced since 1970;

3. Literature focused on undergraduate, graduate school, postdoctoral experiences, early and mid- careers, and/or leadership;

4. Literature from fields that include, but are not limited to, the following: biological sciences; physical sciences (chemistry, physics); computer and information sciences; engineering; mathematics; and the social sciences (sociology; anthropology; science and technology studies; ethnic studies; cultural studies; history of science; philosophy of science; political science; public policy; psychology).


Please note that we are not interested in material on K-12 education, professional education (e.g., medical school), foreign (non-U.S.) students and employees, nor foreign school and employment systems.

We would greatly appreciate any information that you may have regarding literature that meets our criteria by May 16, 2008. Please contact us via e-mail at insidethedoublebind@gmail.com or telephone at 617-547-0430 to share any information you have. Your assistance in our endeavor to summarize the findings on women of color in STEM higher education and careers will be greatly appreciated. We would also be grateful if you could share our solicitation with appropriate subgroups in your organization.

We believe this study will make a significant contribution to the field not only for researchers, but also for educators, administrators, policymakers, and women of color in STEM. Thank you in advance for your help.

Sincerely,

Maria (Mia) Ong, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator, "Inside the Double Bind: A Synthesis of Literature on Women of Color in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics" NSF/DRL-0635577 (with Gary Orfield, Co-PI, UCLA)
TERC
2067 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02140
insidethedoublebind@gmail.com; 617-547-0430


Sponsorship opportunities - Women in Physics

Interested in Helping Increase the Participation of Women in Physics?

Women are greatly underrepresented in physics and in other disciplines, which rely on physics understanding. In the United States, the share of Ph.D.s awarded to women has risen gradually to around 20% , while some countries do twice as well and others do worse. Among university faculty and research leadership, women remain scarce and not very visible. Thus, few girls see role models that make physics an inviting career option for them. In addition, the innovation capacity and competitiveness of physics-intensive organizations cannot take full advantage of the ideas, approaches, energy, and perspectives women physicists would offer, if only there were more.
The International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) is trying to do something about this. You can help by becoming a sponsor of the Third IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP2008; see http://icwip2008.org).

The Conference's purpose is three-fold: (i) to review and analyze of the current status of and progress for women in physics in each country and internationally; (ii) to provide an arena for women in physics to share their scientific accomplishments and create international scientific collaborations; and (iii) to build capacity in each participating country to design and implement changes that improve the participation and advancement of women in physics.
We expect ~300 participants (15% to 20% men) in country teams from ~70 countries, each with at least three members. About one-third of participants will be students, post-docs, or early in their careers. The total cost of the conference is expected to be ~$800 K (including travel costs), shared by numerous sponsors around the world. The success of ICWIP2008 depends on our ability to raise funds in Europe, Asia, and North America to subsidize the travel of teams from the many developing or economically depressed countries in Africa, Latin America, Eastern Europe, and Asia, who could not otherwise afford to participate. Outreach and dissemination, through the proceedings, follow-up sessions at numerous U.S. and international conferences, and via papers, talks, and networking by the delegates in their home countries will maximize the footprint and benefit of ICWIP2008 in the United States and around the world.

The Working Group chartered by IUPAP in 1999 has since organized two highly suc-cessful international conferences on women in physics (2002, 2005). These conferences have revealed the highly variable situation from country to country and are catalyzing change. The series of conferences is proving to be an effective mechanism for sharing best practices internationally, empowering action in numerous countries and regions, nucleating networking in research, strengthening "peer pressure" and accountability through IUPAP, and increasing the numbers and advancement of women in the field.
A donation or grant of US$5,000 entitles the donor to official sponsor designation, with recognition on the conference web site, in the program, and in the published Proceedings. Every sponsor will receive a copy of the Proceedings (in print and CD). Tax-deductible donations may be made through IUPAP, designating ICWIP2008 as the recipient. IUPAP's headquarters is located at the American Physical Society. For additional information, please contact Dr. Beverly Karplus Hartline (questions@uswip.org) or Dr. Judy Franz (franz@aps.org; 301-209-3269).


April 2008Award for Aspirations in Computing

National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) - Award for Aspirations in Computing

--To acknowledge the computing aspirations of young women and to promote visibility for women's participation in computing-related occupations.

--Details on Award Components, Criteria, and Applications are in the Attached flier (See www.ncwit.org/award.
Online self-nominations must be submitted by April 30, 2008. Supporting documents must be received by NCWIT May 2, 2008. Award notification will be made by mid-May 2008.)


Bullying Culture

We had included issues from the The Rise of the Academic Bully Culture (and what to do about it), D. J. Twale and B. M. De Luca (2008).

It now appears on the Listserve of "Tomorrow's Professor" (4/24/2008):


From Chapter 8, Characterizing the Bully Culture in the book, The Rise of the Academic Bully Culture and What to Do About It, by Darla J. Twale and Barbara M. De Luca. Published by Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Imprint, 989 Market Street, San Francisco, CA 94103-1741 Copyright © 2008 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Regards,

Rick Reis
reis@stanford.edu


WST Student-Faculty Research Partnerships

WST Student-Faculty Research Partnerships

WST continues the very successful initiative supporting GT faculty research partnerships with undergraduate students in research on gender, science, and technology, providing hourly funding for undergraduate research assistants. In this way, WST continues to engage students and faculty in active and cooperative learning outside as well as inside the classroom.

If you are interested in undertaking a WST student-faculty partnership through June 2008, pease send an application *as soon as possible* with the following information to

(1) Name of student -- and student's major area of study, social security number, email, and phone; and whether student has previously worked at GT (which is for accounting purposes)
(2) Faculty supervisor
(3) Description of the project for partnership
(4) Proposed number of hours a week for student in partnership (10-15/wk is usual)
(5) Proposed period for the partnership (that is, particular months)
(6) Proposed rate of pay ($8.00 - 9.00/hr. - depending upon the experience of the student)


November 2007Visiting Scholar and Senior Visiting Scholar Positions

The McGill Centre for Research and Teaching on Women is pleased to
announce their annual call for Visiting Scholars. Please note we have
added The Muriel Gold Senior Visiting Scholar position. Read below for
the descriptions.

2008-2009
The Muriel Gold
SENIOR VISITING SCHOLAR
McGILL CENTRE FOR RESEARCH AND
TEACHING ON WOMEN

The McGill Centre for Research and Teaching on Women (MCRTW) invites
applications for the position of Senior Visiting Scholar with the
Centre. This position is open to feminist scholars who wish to spend a
minimum of one academic term at McGill in order to carry out their
research. The Centre offers office space and support, an ongoing seminar
series, contact with other scholars within McGill and in neighbouring
universities - all this located at the centre of a stimulating,
bilingual, urban environment. The Scholar will be expected to take an
active role in the life of the Centre and to present a paper in the
seminar series while in residence at the MCRTW. The award will be in the
amount of $5,000.00.

If interested, please write and include
* a curriculum vitae,
* a brief outline of the research to be undertaken,
* two recent short publications,
* the names of two referees.

Send to:

Professor Marguerite Deslauriers, Director
McGill Centre for Research and Teaching on Women,
3487 Peel Street, 2nd floor,
Montreal, Qc H3A 1W7


IAS-STS Fellowship Programme 2008-2009

IAS-STS Fellowship Programme 2008-2009

The IAS-STS in Graz, Austria, promotes the interdisciplinary
investigation of the links and interactions between science,
technology and society as well as technology assessment
and research into the development and implementation of
socially and environmentally sound technologies.

The IAS-STS invites researchers to apply for a stay between
1 October 2008 and 30 June 2009 as

- Research Fellow (up to nine months) or as
- Visiting Scholar (shorter period, e.g. a month).

The IAS-STS offers excellent research infrastructure. Close
co-operation with researchers at the IFZ (Inter-University
Research Centre for Technology, Work and Culture;
see: www.ifz.tugraz.at ), guest lectures, workshops and
conferences provide an atmosphere of creativity and
scholarly discussion.

Furthermore we can offer five grants (up to EUR 1,000 per
month) for long-term Research Fellows (up to nine months)
at the IAS-STS.

The Fellowship Programme 2008-2009 is dedicated to
projects investigating the following issues:

1. Gender – Technology – Environment
Women with their various interests, competencies and
potentials play an important part in the process of shaping
socially sound and environmentally friendly sustainable
technologies – as users and consumers or experts.
Applications should focus on research in the field of women
in traditionally male fields of engineering, on ways of
creating cultures of success for women engineers (students,
graduates), and on masculinity and the culture of engineering.

2. New Genetics and Modern Biotechnology
A focus of the Fellowship Programme lies on research
providing a critical analysis either of human genetic research
or of modern biotechnology. Researchers investigating either
ethical, legal and social aspects of genetic testing in the
medical domain or risk policy and wider governance issues
related to agricultural biotechnology are especially
encouraged to apply.

3. Technology Studies and Sustainability
Fellowships will be awarded for research projects contributing
to the issue of sustainable development from the perspective
of social studies or the history and philosophy of science and
technology. Projects should aim at socio-economic aspects of
environmental technologies or at strategies of environmental
technology policy, such as user participation, strategic niche
management or ecological product policy. We encourage both
theoretical analysis as well as empirical case studies and
implementation research. As a special grant within this
thematical focus the Manfred-Heindler-grant for research
projects on the increased use of renewable energies and
on a more efficient use of energy will be awarded.

4. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT)

A focus of the Fellowship Programme will be put on novel
developments based on ICT from an STS point of view.
Topics like ICT and agency, ubiquitous computing or ICT and
mobility shall be analysed with respect to their wider social and
political implications. Further issues of interest are the social
shaping of ICT developments, innovation policies, risk
management and participatory approaches to the design of
ICT systems and applications.

Applications must be submitted to the IAS-STS
by 31 December 2007.


October 2007Exploring Ways to Shorten the Ascent to a Ph.D.

EDUCATION | October 3, 2007
On Education: Exploring Ways to Shorten the Ascent to a Ph.D.
By JOSEPH BERGER
For those who attempt it, the doctoral dissertation can loom on the horizon like Everest, gleaming invitingly as a challenge but often turning into a masochistic exercise once the ascent is begun.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/03/education/03education.html?ex=1192420800&en=f64d33b92f67a6f0&ei=5070&emc=eta1

NYTimes.com 620 Eighth Avenue New York, NY 10018
Copyright 2007 The New York Times Company


Family & Productivity - Flourish Newsletter

Editor: Wendy Belcher
Web: www.wendybelcher.com

A Free Electronic Newsletter for Scholarly Writers
October 2007, vol. 3, no. 9

Family and Productivity
If you wondered whether your family was helping or hindering your scholarship, new research suggests that academics who are married or have children do fine in terms of productivity (J. Price 2006). A couple of years ago, some scary studies were published about how women with young children were less likely to get tenure or be promoted than anyone else, while men with children were more likely to get tenure and be promoted (National Science Foundation 2004). But another large study found that having a family has very little effect on the actual productivity of either female or male faculty ( Sax, Hagedorn, Arredondo, Dicrisi 2002). Women with families are just as productive as women without families.

In other words, the gender gap in publication rates, which has steadily been closing, is not explained by the weight of domestic responsibilities. Rather, this slightly lower rate seems to have more to do with women’s not prioritizing advancement and field recognition at this time in their lives (Sax, Hagedorn, Arredondo, Dicrisi 2002).

This isn’t to imply that male and female faculty experience family responsibilities in the same way. Among men and women with the same publication rates, female faculty did more work around the home and spent fewer hours per week on writing and research than male faculty. This is really interesting to me. Women seemed to be more efficient, producing the same amount of writing in less time. This reflects another finding about women, that women faculty at research universities seemed to do better at publishing steadily, rather than falling into the extremes of no publications or a very high number of publications (Sax, Hagedorn, Arredondo, Dicrisi 2002).

Another useful article on this topic is one by Mary Frank Fox, who is a reader of Flourish. She looks at the relationships among marriage, parental status, and publication productivity for tenured men and women in academic science. She does an excellent job of teasing out the way that these factors affect academics in different ways at different points in their lives. For instance, for women, being married to another academic often correlates with less productivity on a first marriage but more productivity on a second marriage ( Fox 2005).


September 2007Please join us -- Reception-Sept 19

Georgia Institute of Technology’s Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology (WST)
The Women’s Resource Center (WRC)
and the Georgia Tech ADVANCE Professors

Cordially invite you to join us in a reception welcoming new women faculty
and thanking WST mentors, WRC student leaders, and the WST
Learning Community for their contributions to campus life

Wednesday, September 19, 2007
2-3:30 p.m.
Georgia Tech Library East Commons



Transforming Science and Engineering: Advancing Academic Women

The ADVANCE Program at the University of Michigan is pleased to announce that Transforming Science and Engineering: Advancing Academic Women will be available in early October 2007. Published by the University of Michigan Press, Transforming Science and Engineering contains information about specific initiatives that have been successful in meeting the goals of improving the work environment for academic women scientists and engineers. These initiatives were developed in the context of NSF's ADVANCE Institutional Transformation Program, but can be applied by institutions without special external funding. Chapters include discussion of both theoretical and empirical research undergirding the initiatives; the emphasis is on the practical issues involved in creating the initiatives, and evidence that they have desired effects. The book, which includes materials from other ADVANCE institutions, was co-edited by Abigail Stewart, Janet Malley, and Danielle Lavaque-Manty at the University of Michigan. More information is available by visiting http://sitemaker.umich.edu/advance/transforming.


April 2007IAC Faculty luncheon - Please Hold the Date

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us for the Ivan Allen College-wide Faculty luncheon Monday, April 23rd, 2007, from Noon to 1:30pm in the Student Center Ballroom. RSVP
with your choice of lunch to Carol Silvers,

carol.silvers@iac.gatech.edu, by noon on April 17th.

In addition to the opportunity to see your colleagues from across the College, the luncheon will feature a panel and discussion on Building Interdisciplinary Research Teams with four distinguished panelists from across Georgia Tech:

Marilyn Brown - Professor of Public Policy

http://www.spp.gatech.edu/faculty/faculty/mbrown.php

Judith Curry - Professor and Chair of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

http://www.eas.gatech.edu/people/faculty/curry.htm

Glenn Rix - Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering


http://www.ce.gatech.edu/fac_staff/research_bio.php?active_id=gr16

Craig Zimring - Professor of Architecture

http://www.coa.gatech.edu/phd/faculty/zimring/zimring.htm


Further on: Language, gender, & power in the workplace.

Lunch/discussion on "Language, Gender, and Power in the Workplace"

Sponsored by GT Faculty Career Development Services (FCDS - directed by Monique Tavares)

Tuesday, April 10, 11 am - 12:30 pm
Crescent Room in the Student Commons

RSVP:


Mary Frank Fox


March 2007Five post doc positions in gender and science

Five post doc positions in gender and science

Last day of application: 30 March

Centre for Gender Research is currently engaged upon expanding its
resources for research within the newly started programme of gender
excellence, Nature/culture Boundaries and Transgressive Encounters. Uppsala
Centre for Gender Research has quickly developed into a unique place of
meeting for scientists and students with a range of disciplinary
backgrounds unprecedented in Sweden. From the beginning concrete and
focused efforts have rendered organisational and scientific boundary
transgressions possible. These interdisciplinary research and teaching
efforts has rendered quick results and produced networks between the
cultural and natural sciences that we now will explore further. The
objectives for the five-year programme is thus to uphold a research
environment that boosts empirical investigations and theoretical
reflections on how gender and gendered knowledge is produced in the
borderland between the cultural and the natural sciences in empirical
research, theory development and teaching.
The Centre for Gender Research is a research intense unit, consisting of
about 20 researchers from different disciplines. We are now recruiting
additional post-docs for full-time, one-year positions. Successful
applicants have some kind of "double" competence - gender research and
science - in one of the following research areas:
1) Gender and physics. The interface between gender research and physics
has mostly been restricted to understand "women in science"; conditions,
power-relations, mechanisms of exclusion and the like. We encourage
applicants to focus on questions about gendered knowledge and materiality.
2) Gender and animal research. Animal research has traditionally, with some
very important exceptions, been viewed as "outside" of gender and feminist
concerns. Applicants in this area are welcomed to focus on issues
concerning the gendering of animals, and the animaling of gender, in

biological and other research.
3) Trans-disciplinary feminist didactics. Gender didactics is an
undeveloped field, mainly in Sweden but also internationally. At the same
time it is pivotal in all gender research to understand how gender is
communicated. Hence teaching is the key to transdisciplinary encounters,
which is why a national knowledge base in gender didactics is expected to
contribute to deepen the planned trans-disciplinary research and theory
development. To meet this requirement, we invite a visiting scientist
position in feminist didactics who will start the building of such a
knowledge base.
The persons we are looking for have different disciplinary backgrounds, and
may therefore be researchers in for example pedagogy, history of science,
sociology, biology or physics. The anticipated starting date is 1 August 2007.
Applicants should have a doctorate or equivalent, a strong record of
research achievement at an international level in the study of gender and
science, and the demonstrated capacity to publish in top-rated journals and
to present at international conferences. The successful candidate is
expected to contribute imaginatively to the design and delivery of the
excellence programme. Further details, including how to apply, is available
at www.uu.gender.se/node6. Questions may be posed to Professor Margaretha
Fahlgren, Margaretha.Fahlgren@gender.uu.se or PhD Tora Holmberg,
Tora.Holmberg@gender.uu.se. Since this programme will develop further over
a five-year period, we encourage researchers with interest in this area to
contact us for future exchange.
The closing date for applications is 30 March 2007.



Sara Goodman
Centrum för genusvetenskap
Lunds universitet
www.genus.lu.se
Tel 046-222 44 02, 046-222 9778
Fax 046-222 40 04
Besöksadress: Magle Stora Kyrkogata 12 B, Lund
Postadress: Box 117, 221 00 Lund



REMINDER ABOUT MARCH 29 NSF GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP WORKSHOPS

EMINDER ABOUT MARCH 29 NSF GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP WORKSHOPS


Please plan to attend the NSF Graduate Fellowship Workshops on March 29--there is no need to preregister.

Dr. Earnestine Psalmonds from NSF will be on campus that day to present a workshop for students and another for faculty.

STUDENTS:
11:10 NSF Graduate Fellowship Workshop at Management Auditorium 200
Application deadline is in November. You will learn about plans for the 2007 application process, any changes that are planned, and how to produce an effective application.
There will be pizza slices available after the presentation.


FACULTY:
4:00 NSF Graduate Fellowship Workshop at Management Auditorium 300
Dr. Psalmonds will present information to faculty about mentoring students who are applying for NSF fellowships and about their involvement in the review process if they are interested. There will be a Q&A period.
Cheese and fruit will be available after the presentation.



TRANSPORTATION and PARKING:
The GT trolley stops at the Management Building, and there is parking available at the Georgia Tech Hotel on Spring St. (near 5th).

Fellowship Communication Program Contact: Dr. Karen Adams, Karen.Adams@provost. gatech.edu



NSF Presentation at Georgia Tech - March 29th

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF)
REPRESENTATIVE TO PRESENT

WORKSHOPS AT GEORGIA TECH
THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 2007


Dr. Earnestine Psalmonds, NSF Program Director for the Graduate Fellowship Research Program, will present workshops at Georgia Tech for students, faculty, and research scientists on Thursday, March 29.

Student* Workshop:

11:10 am – 12:00, Thursday March 29 in College of Management Auditorium 200, 800 West Peachtree St., NW; Atlanta, GA 30308. Dr. Psalmonds will be available for a short time after noon to answer questions.

This workshop is for graduate and undergraduate students who wish to apply for 2008 NSF awards. Application deadlines are in the fall, but preparatory work for these applications needs to be done during the spring and summer.

Students typically have 3 opportunities to apply for an NSF award: 1) fall of last undergraduate year; 2) first fall of graduate school; and 3) second fall of graduate school.

Freshmen, sophomores, and juniors are encouraged to attend and learn about the awards and how they might plan future applications.

*NSF applicants must be US citizens or permanent residents.


Workshop for Faculty and Research Scientists:

4:00-5:00 p.m., Thursday March 29 in College of Management Auditorium 300.

The workshop for faculty and research scientists will focus on
§ mentoring students as they apply for NSF grants and
§ exploring the possibility of serving as a NSF reviewer.

Contact:
Dr. Karen Adams, Fellowship Communication Program, karen.adams@provost.gatech.edu.


January 2007Stories/and Strategies

Recently released:

Every Other Thursday: Stories and Strategies from Successful Women Scientists, by Ellen Daniell.
New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006.

From the book-jacket:
This book tells the story of a professional problem-solving group that for more than 25 years has empowered its members by providing practical and emotional support.
Each of the high-achieving individuals in Group (including members of the National Academy of Sciences, a senior scientist at a prestigious research institute, and university professors and administrators) has found the support of the others to be an essential part of her own success.


December 2006Equal Rites, Unequal Outcomes: Women in Am Res Universities

Dear IAC Friends,

A volume to which one may have reason to return has been re-issued:
Equal Rites, Unequal Outcomes; Women in American Research Universities (2003), edited by L. Hornig, a pioneer in the field.

Amazon has a "Look Inside" option for the volume at its site at:
http://www.amazon.com/o/ASIN/0306473518/ref=pd_rvi_gw_1/002-4420730-0476809

with good wishes - Mary


November 2006Provost to meet WST community

Georgia Tech's provost, Dr.Gary Schuster, will be speaking with WST residents on Monday, November 27, at 5:30pm in 4th Apartments A study lounge.



WST Research Panel: "The International Mobility of Scientists"

Dr. Carolina Cañibano
Assistant Professor of Economics
Rey Juan Carlos University, Madrid, Spain
and Visiting Scholar in PRIME Program, School of Public Policy, Georgia Tech

Dr. Paula Stephan
Professor of Economics
Andrew Young School of Policy Studies
Georgia State University

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2006
12 noon - 1:30 pm

Georgia Tech Student Success Center
President's Suite C

Biographies:
Dr. Paula Stephan's research focuses on the careers of scientists and engineers and the process by which knowledge moves across international boundaries in the economy; as well as the role that immigrant scientists play in U.S. science. She has published more than 50 articles and is the co-author of the book, Striking the Mother Lode in Science: The Importance of Age, Place, and Time. Dr. Stephan was recently appointed to serve a four-year term on the National Advisory General Medical Sciences Council, National Institutes of Health, and currently serves on the Advisory Committee of the Social, Behavioral, and Economics Program, National Science Foundation. She was a member of the European Commission High-Level Expert Group that authored the report, "Frontier Research: The European Challenge." She is a member of the Scientific and Engineering Workforce Project of the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Dr. Carolina Cañibano's research focuses upon the economics of innovation, with a special focus on labor markets for science, and development economics. She received her Ph.D. at the Autonomous University of Madrid (UAM), Spain and was the recipient of the 2004 Dissertation Award from the Economics Section, Spanish Doctors Academy. Currently, she is a Visiting Scholar at Georgia Tech's School of Public Policy, affiliated with the PRIME Program. Her research is funded by the European Commission.


October 2006Flourish: an electronic Newsletter for academic writers

Flourish: an electronic Newsletter for academic writers at: http://www.wendybelcher.com/pages/FlourishNewsletter.html

If you go to the url, a space is available at the bottom of the page for a free subscription.


September 2006Cynthia Nelson Institute for Gender & Women's Studies

For feminist scholars interested in the Middle East: The American University in Cairo has named the Institute for Gender and Women's Studies the Cynthia Nelson Institute. This honors the late Cynthia
Nelson, Professor of Anthropology at AUC, who died in February of this year. Cynthia Nelson's 43 year career there included founding the Institute, serving as Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences, and
substantial body of important feminist work, including a biography of the early Egyptian feminist, Doria Shewfik. A graduate fellowship to the Institute in her name has also been established. For details about the Institute and its Master of Arts and Graduate Diploma in Gender and
Women's Studies with a focus on the Middle East and North Africa, the web site is: www.aucegypt.edu/igws .


Princeton University - Postdoctoral Fellows in Liberal Arts

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY SOCIETY OF FELLOWS IN THE LIBERAL ARTS ˜ Postdoctoral

Fellowships in Humanities or Social Sciences The Princeton University Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts invites
applications for three-year postdoctoral fellowships, 2007-2010, for recent Ph.Ds (from Jan. 2004) in humanities or social sciences. Stipend: approx. $64,500. Application deadline: October 3, 2006.

Four appointments to pursue research and teach half-time:
1) Open Fellowship: all disciplines represented in the Society of Fellows.
2) Haarlow Fellowship in Humanistic Studies: pursue research, teach and coordinate interdisciplinary year-long humanities course, Approaches to Western Culture.
3) Fellowship in East Asian Studies and the Humanities: pursue research, teach and coordinate interdisciplinary year-long course, East Asian Humanities: The Classical Traditions.
4) Fellowship in International Development to enhance interdisciplinary dialogue and teaching in this field, with particular focus on political, ethical and/or social dimensions of issues. Political scientists, sociologists and economists interested in a cross-disciplinary policy focus on international development are strongly encouraged to apply.

For details, see website www.princeton.edu/~sf


Travelling Concepts in Feminist Pedagogy: European Perspectives

Travelling Concepts in Feminist Pedagogy: European Perspectives is a series of 4 short books addressing the importance of geographical, institutional and political location for understanding feminist concepts. The project brings together 24 partners from across Europe, and has published collaborative reflections on the material life of concepts such as :
representation, interdisciplinarity, location, racism, citizenship, and identity. Please visit http://www.rawnervebooks.co.uk/ for further details, and http://www.travellingconcepts.net for the interactive website arising from the project.


August 2006Hawaii International Conference on Arts & Humanities

Call for Papers/Abstracts/Proposals

Hawaii International Conference on Arts & Humanities January 12 - 15, 2007
Waikiki Beach Marriott Resort & Spa, the Radisson Waikiki Prince Kuhio, and
the Pacific Beach Hotel, Hawaii, USA

Since many people have individually asked for an extension of the submission
deadline, we are extending the deadline for submissions to Wednesday,
September 13th, 2006.

Call for papers, abstracts, student papers, work-in-progress reports,
research proposals, workshop proposals, poster sessions, research tables, or
reports on issues related to teaching, practitioner forums, panel
discussions, and tutorials. For more information on the format of
submissions see http://www.hichumanities.org/cfp_artshumanities.htm

All areas of arts & humanities are invited. For a complete list of
suggested areas of arts & humanities see
http://www.hichumanities.org/cfp_artshumanities.htm.
Submissions may be
made electronically via e-mail to humanities@hichumanities.org.


March 2006Social Science Research Council Invites Applications

Deadline: April 20, 2006

The Economic and Social Research Council
( http://www.esrc.ac.uk/ ) and the Social Science
Research Council ( http://www.ssrc.org/ ) have announced
a fellowship for U.S. and Canadian scholars to visit and
engage in collaborative activities with members of ESRC-
supported projects in Britain, or for British scholars
at ESRC-supported projects to visit collaborators in the
U.S. or Canada, between June 2006 and September 2007.

ESRC and SSRC have a common mission of promoting,
funding, and disseminating important and socially useful
knowledge in the social sciences. This is the third round
of a pilot scheme designed to encourage communication and
cooperation between social scientists in Great Britain
and the United States and Canada, and to explore and
develop possibilities for future exchanges to be
organized by ESRC and SSRC.

Approximately ten research fellowships of up to $8,500
will be awarded. Funds may be used for transportation,
accommodation, living expenses, and, exceptionally, to
cover salary costs for the duration of the visit. Fund-
able activities include but are not strictly limited to
engaging in collaborative or complementary research that
will add a new international comparative focus to
existing research projects; engaging with a range of
researchers, including younger scholars, to stimulate
international and comparative dimensions to their
thinking; writing co- authored papers, articles, and
books; and developing new proposals for joint research.

Applicants from the U.S. and Canada should have received
a Ph.D. in one of the social sciences (including history)
by the time the proposed visiting fellowship would start.
In addition, they should have been based in the U.S. for
at least two years before the application deadline. The
fellowship scheme is open to scholars from U.S. and
Canadian universities, colleges, independent research
organizations, and public agencies, as well as to scholars
at ESRC-supported centers, programs, groups, and networks
in Britain.

Visit the SSRC Web site for complete program information
and application procedures.

RFP Link:
http://fconline.fdncenter.org/pnd/10001199/ssrc

For additional RFPs in Social Science, visit:
http://fdncenter.org/pnd/rfp/cat_soc_science.jhtml



September 2005Dr. Carol Colatrella - GT Advance Program Director

Please welcome our new GT Advance Program Director - the indefatigable, creative, and intellectually and programmatically inspired: Dr. Carol Colatrella !

Our Advance Program Director, Dr. Mary Lynn Reallf - now brings her own indefatigability, creativity, and inspiration to the National Science Foundation as Program Officer for the Materials Processing and Manufacturing in the Engineering Directorate,

Our best wishes and fond regards go to Carol in her new appointment with Advance -- and to Mary Lynn in her new appointment at NSF (as well as in her continuation as co-director of WST!).



July 2005Agnotology: The Cultural Production of Ignorance

Call for Papers

Patrick Suppes Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Science and Technology, Stanford University

Professors Londa Schiebinger and Robert Proctor seek papers for the preparation of a volume introducing a new theoretical perspective and methodology - agnotology, the cultural production of ignorance-into interdisciplinary science studies. Papers should explore how ignorance is produced or maintained in diverse settings, through (for example) deliberate or inadvertent neglect, secrecy and suppression, document destruction, and myriad forms of inherent or avoidable culturopolitical selectivity and forgetfulness. The point is to develop a taxonomy of understandings and uses of ignorance, but also tools for understanding how and why diverse forms of knowledge do not or did not "come to be" or are delayed or neglected at different points in history. Examples include the ignorance of cancer
hazards caused by the "doubt" peddled by trade associations (Brown and Williamson's "doubt is our product"), the non-transfer of birth control technologies from colonial outposts to imperial centers (by virtue of successive chains of disinterest and suppression), the non-development of certain technologies by virtue of structural apathies or disinterest, impacts of disciplinarity on agnotogenesis, etc. The proposed volume is exploratory and open-ended, with the purpose of coming to grips with how ignorance has been understood, created, and ignored, linking this also to allied creations of secrecy, uncertainty, confusion, silence, forgetfulness, etc - especially as these pertain to scientific inquiries and outcomes. The idea is that a great deal of attention has been given to epistemology (the study of how we know), when "how or why we don't know" is often at least as interesting-and remarkably undertheorized by comparison.


While the volume will focus on science, the general approach will also be taken up in other disciplines, including cultural studies, history, literary studies, anthropology, and sociology. Paper proposals should include a working title plus a 300 word abstract. Please send to Londa Schiebinger at schiebinger@stanford.edu by August 30, 2005.

Paper proposals should include a working title plus a 300 word abstract. Please send to Londa Schiebinger at schiebinger@stanford.edu by August 30, 2005.


Call for Papers/Abstracts/Submissions

4th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities
January 11 - 14, 2006
Renaissance Ilikai Waikiki Hotel, Honolulu Hawaii, USA

Submission Deadline: August 23, 2005

Sponsored by:
East West Council for Education
Asia-Pacific Research Institute of Peking University
University of Louisville - Center for Sustainable Urban Neighborhoods

Web address: http://www.hichumanities.org
Email address: humanities@hichumanities.org

The 4th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities will be held from January 11 (Wednesday) to January 14 (Saturday), 2006 at the Renaissance Ilikai Waikiki Hotel in Honolulu, Hawaii. The conference will provide many opportunities for academicians and professionals from arts and humanities related fields to interact with members inside and outside their own particular disciplines. Cross-disciplinary submissions with other fields are welcome. Performing artists (live dance, theater, and music) interested in displaying their talents will be accommodated whenever possible.

Topic Areas (All Areas of Arts and Humanities are Invited):

*Anthropology
*American Studies
*Archeology
*Architecture
*Art
*Art History
*Dance
*English
*Ethnic Studies
*Film
*Graphic Design
*History
*Landscape Architecture
*Languages
*Literature
*Linguistics
*Music
*Performing Arts
*Philosophy
*Religion
*Second Language Studies
*Speech/Communication
*Theatre
*Visual Arts
*Other Areas of Arts and Humanities
*Cross-disciplinary areas of the above related to each other or other areas.

The Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities encourages the following types of papers/abstracts/submissions for any of the listed areas:

Research Papers - Completed papers.
Abstracts - Abstracts of completed or proposed research.
Student Papers - Research by students.
Work-in-Progress Reports or Proposals for future projects.
Reports on issues related to teaching.

For detailed information about submissions see:
http://www.hichumanities.org/cfp_artshumanities.htm

Submitting a Proposal:

1. Create a title page for your submission. The title page should include:

a. title of the submission
b. topic area of the submission (chooses from above list)
c. presentation format (see
http://www.hichumanities.org/cfp_artshumanities.htm for format choices)
d. name(s) of the author(s)
e. department(s) and affiliation(s)
f. mailing address(es)
g. e-mail address(es)
h. phone number(s)
i. fax number(s)
j. corresponding author if different than lead author

2. Email your abstract and/or paper, along with a title page, to: humanities@hichumanities.org. Receipt of submissions will be acknowledged via email within 48 hours.

Please note that there is a limit of two contributed submissions per lead author.

To be removed from this list, please click the following link:
http://www.hichumanities.org/remove/ or copy and paste the link into any web browser.

Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities
P.O. Box 75036
Honolulu, HI 96836 USA
Telephone: (808) 949-1456
Fax: (808) 947-2420
E-mail: humanities@hichumanities.org
Website: http://www.hichumanities.org


March 2005Alternative Energy Technology Innovation: The Coming Economic Boom

May 12th – 13th, 2005
Savannah, GA
International Trade & Convention Center

Call For Abstracts
Student Poster Competition

A FORUM FOR THE PRESENTATION OF ENERGY RELATED RESEARCH BY ENGINEERING, SCIENCE, ECONOMICS, AND POLICY STUDENTS

Please submit a 1-page abstract describing your poster topic to susan@energy.gatech.edu by April 4th, 2005.

12 selected winners will be invited to present their poster at the workshop and will be awarded a $300 grant to offset travel & lodging expenses.

SPONSORED BY THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION & InfinitEnergy
(http://infinitenergy.gtrep.gatech.edu)


February 2005Visiting Scholar in Feminist Perspectives on Globalization

The Canadian International Development Agency-International Development Research Centre- University of Ottawa-Carleton University

The Institute of Women's Studies (University of Ottawa) and the Pauline Jewett Institute of Women's Studies (Carleton University), with the support of the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), are pleased to announce the second year of a research programme on feminist perspectives on globalization. This four year (2004-2008) programme offers highly qualified researchers working on issues of globalization from a feminist perspective, from developing countries in Africa, the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean and the South Pacific, the opportunity to spend a research term in Ottawa based at one of the two universities. The Visiting Scholar in Feminist Perspectives on Globalization will contribute to gender and development research at both universities and provide a unique opportunity for collaboration between feminist scholars in Canada and the developing world and between North and South.The Institutes of Women's Studies will alternate in welcoming one visiting scholar per year.

Applications are invited for the 2005-6 Visiting Scholar in Feminist Perspectives on Globalization to be based at the Institute of Women's Studies at the University of Ottawa. (In 2006-2007, the Visiting Scholar will be based at the Pauline Jewett Institute of Women's Studies, Carleton University.) The position is open to scholars from developing countries (both tenured and untenured faculty, as well as from post­doctoral or independent scholars) who are pursuing critical feminist research. Applicants must be fluent in French, have a completed PhD, a record of scholarly publications, and a current and established research project in relation to one or more of the research field listed below. Individuals currently pursuing a university doctoral degree are not eligible.

Specific areas of interest can include one of the following: agriculture, basic education, child protection, health and nutrition, HIV/Aids, information and communication technologies (ICTs), human rights, democratization and good governance, conflict and peacebuilding, private sector development, infrastructure services (capacity building), social and economic equity, or environment and natural resource management.

During their stay in Canada, the Visiting Scholar will pursue and present their ongoing research in conferences and seminars as requested, participate in outreach activities, and produce a paper based on their ongoing research which reflects their time and work in Canada. It is anticipated that this research will promote policy advocacy and/or further gender and development studies and the effective integration of gender equality in development policy and programming.

The duration of the Visiting Scholar's stay will be a six (6) month period within the university's 2005-2006 academic year, which runs from September 2005 to April 2006. The recipient will receive a generous stipend to cover travel, research and living expenses (including medical insurance coverage). The successful applicant will have access to library services, a shared phone and computer facilities.

Applications may be submitted in French or English, and must include: an abbreviated curriculum vitae (10-12 pp.); a letter of intent outlining the research to be undertaken in Canada (max. 2 pp.); a list of recent publications; availability during the 2005-2006 academic year; and the names and addresses (postal and e-mail) of two referees. Please forward applications to: Selection Committee, Visiting Scholar in Feminist
Perspectives on Globalization, c/o Helene Boudreault, Institute of Women's Studies, University of Ottawa, 143 Seraphin-Marion, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1S 5B6; Telephone (613) 520-6644; Fax (613) 562­5994;email hboudre@uottawa.ca.

The closing date for submitting applications is March 10, 2005 (application dossiers received after this date will not be examined). Selection will be completed by May 15, 2005. Please note that only the short-listed candidates will be contacted.


December 2004Women, Tenure, and Promotion Special Issue of the National Women's Studies Association Journal [2007]

Co-editors: Dr. Ines Shaw and Dr. Sharon Leder, Nassau Community College, and Dr. Betty Harris, University of Oklahoma.

Deadline for Submissions: 1 May 2005

After more than three decades of women's studies in the academy and a steady increase of women faculty in higher education across the disciplines, it is appropriate to take stock of what we have learned and what still needs to be accomplished. Contributors may consider the following:

Status of Women and Changing the Structures: How can Academic structures change so that a) women rise through and occupy all ranks in equal proportion to men, and are not stuck in the lowest ranks with the lowest salaries? b) joint appointments and shared courses become regular systemic options? c) committees and administrations are monitored for accountability in promotion and/or tenure decisions? d) campus Affirmative Action offices actively encourage, defend, and
insure gender equity?

Mentoring: What type of mentoring a) really advances the attainment of tenure and/or promotion for all women? b) helps service and activist contributions count for promotion or tenure?

Student Evaluations/Faculty Ratings: What can counteract Negative consequences of gender, race, and ethnic bias in student evaluations or ratings of women faculty in tenure and/or promotion decisions?

Court Trends: How can knowledge of current trends in gender
discrimination lawsuits prepare women for litigation?

Tenure and Promotion Struggles and Denials: a) What factors halt women faculty's paths to tenure or promotion? b) How may criteria for promotion or tenure change so that teaching and service scholarship count as real scholarship? c) How may criteria change so that interdisciplinary, feminist and activist work count toward promotion or tenure? d) What roles do personal and family life play in women's struggles to gain tenure and/or promotion? e) How are women's physical and mental health, financial status and professional life affected by denials of tenure and/or promotion, and by strategies they employ in response? f) What are the financial, educational, and human costs of not tenuring or not promoting women faculty?

A 150-word abstract should be submitted with a completed essay of 20-30 pages, including abstract, notes, and references--two copies to Dr. Ines Shaw, English Department, Nassau Community College, One Education Drive, Garden City, NY 11530, and one copy to Dr. Betty Harris, Women's Studies Program, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019.

NWSA Journal Style guidelines are available at www.nwsaj.eng.iastate.edu.

Inquiries can be directed to Dr. Ines Shaw at shawi@sunynassau.edu.

Ines Shaw isshaw@yahoo.com
Ph.D., Linguistics shawi@sunynassau.edu
English/Women's Studies/Latin American Studies & 210 E
Broadway (The Delmar) Co-op Board Vice-President


November 2004Denmark Summer Study Abroad Program

I am currently planning to bring interested Georgia Tech students to Denmark this summer for a new study abroad program based in Copenhagen. Students would take humanities and social science courses and would learn about Danish culture, politics, and heritage. I hope that you would suggest that students consider the Denmark summer study program as they decide on summer experiences for 2005. Detailed information appears below and at http://www.discopenhagen.org.

The program focuses on analyzing Denmark as a living laboratory of social and technological developments and design innovations. Georgia Tech students will participate in Denmark’s International Study (DIS) Program, taking one DIS course in addition to enrolling in a summer equivalent of LCC 3302: Science, Technology, and Ideology taught by me. My course will emphasize looking at Danish social values in relation to social welfare/gender equity policies, energy/environment development, and museum design. There will be structured field trips in Copenhagen, Aarhus, Roskilde, and Odense.

Denmark is a small, safe country where many people speak fluent English. There is an affordable, efficient country-wide transportation system of buses, trains, and ferries; interesting architecture; innovative museums and other design sites; a beautiful natural environment, and a hospitable friendly population. In addition to being a lively cosmopolitan city, Copenhagen is a gateway to other European cities.

I welcome individual inquiries. Please email or call me. I'll be meeting with DIS staff in mid November in Copenhagen, and I am grateful for the support of Georgia Tech's office of International Education, which is helping to
coordinate the 2005 Denmark program.

STUDY ABROAD IN ENGLISH IN COPENHAGEN
Georgia Tech and Denmark's International Study Abroad Program, affliated with the University of Copenhagen.

Late May through June 2005

Live in Copenhagen with a family or in a university residence hall with other students

Field trips to Roskilde, Odense, and Aarhus

Earn six credits of Humanities/Social Sciences courses:

Science, Technology, and Ideology (equivalent to LCC 3302) & your choice from Danish International Study program courses
(see http://www.discopenhagen.org, for more information)

Approximate program cost (tuition and housing) is $5,445 (Other expenses include food, airfare, excursions, fees)

For more information, contact:

Professor Carol Colatrella
School of Literature, Communication, and Culture
Georgia Tech Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology
Office: Skiles 364
Office voice mail/phone: 404 894 1241
Email: carol.colatrella@lcc.gatech.edu


October 200414th Annual Georgia Women's Assembly

A one-day conference being held in Atlanta on Nov. 19, 2004, at the Loudermilk Center from 8am-4pm. The subject is "Informed Women and the Power of Policy." One of the three keynote speakers is Georgia's Secretary of State Cathy Cox, who is the first woman to serve in this position. The workshops vary from healthcare to lobbying 101 to two parts on the Georgia budget.

Registration is $85 before Nov. 3, $100 after, and $45 for students (anytime).

http://www.healthTRAKga.org


MIT Summer Institute in the Materials Science of Material Culture

With support from the National Science Foundation, MIT will convene the fourth annual Summer Institute in the Materials Science of Material Culture (SIMSMC). Fifteen faculty members from liberal arts colleges around the country, representing fields from art history to physics, will participate during the two-week period, 6-17 June 2005.

Working together with these colleagues, the MIT SIMSMC faculty demonstrate, through modules that explore materials engineering in the context of material culture, how undergraduate teaching can incorporate the subject matter of materials science in imaginative and intellectually stimulating ways that are congruent with and relevant to the pursuits of liberal arts institutions.

The two modules that will be presented at the June 2005 SIMSMC are:

The Power of Metal in the Andean World
Heather Lechtman

Form, Function and Aesthetics in Colonial New England: The Use of Wood for Furniture, Houses and Boats
John Vander Sande, Samuel Allen

In morning lectures and afternoon laboratories, the Summer Institutes concentrate on the materials processing technologies that transform natural and synthetic materials into cultural objects. Our template joins archaeology and materials science and engineering, but art history,
classics, environmental science, geography, history and other fields are all excellent vehicles for providing students with an integrated educational experience as they explore the relations between people and their material world.

SIMSMC pays participant expenses: round-trip travel to MIT, housing on campus, and meals. Visit the SIMSMC web site for an on-line APPLICATION FORM and further information. http://web.mit.edu/materialculture/www

Please review our web site to learn more about this innovative educational experiment and how you can participate.

We urge you to share this information with colleagues at your institution and at other colleges who may wish to join us in June 2005.

Heather Lechtman
Professor of Archaeology and Ancient Technology
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
MIT

Inquiries may be addressed to: materialculture@mit.edu


Marilyn Yarbrough Dissertation/Teaching Fellowship

One of the most significant challenges confronting small liberal arts colleges in the United States today is increasing the members of underrepresented groups teaching at such institutions. A diverse faculty benefits students, faculty, and administrators alike by enriching the nature of the education experience for all. We recognize, though, that young scholars who are members of underrepresented groups frequently choose to pursue their careers as teachers and scholars at research universities rather than at small liberal arts colleges. In order to encourage such scholars to consider college rather than university teaching, Kenyon College offers the Marilyn Yarbrough Dissertation/Teaching Fellowship. The program is for scholars in the final stages of their doctoral work who need only to finish the dissertation to complete requirements for the Ph.D. We hope the experience of living and working for a year at Kenyon will encourage these Fellows to consider a career at a liberal arts college.

Kenyon will provide a stipend of $32,500, plus health benefits, housing, and a small moving allowance. The College will also provide an allowance to cover travel to conferences or for consultation with the dissertation director.
Kenyon will assist the Fellow in finding college housing. The Fellow will be provided an office, a networked computer, and secretarial support services. Faculty colleagues at Kenyon recognize and embrace the opportunity to welcome and mentor new faculty members.

The Fellow is expected to write the dissertation and to teach one course each semester, usually in the Fellow's general research area. Fellows are also expected to offer a college lecture or departmental seminar on the dissertation topic at some point during the academic year in residence. Kenyon College assumes that the Fellow will participate in the intellectual life of his/her home department, as well as in the broader cultural life of the College. Our primary expectation, however, and the main focus of this fellowship, is the completion of the dissertation.

Eligibility to apply for the Marilyn Yarbrough Dissertation/Teaching Fellowship is limited to those meeting all of the following four criteria who are citizens or nationals of the United States or otherwise 'protected individuals' as defined in 8 USC 1324b(a)(3)(B).

- Members of underrepresented groups (e.g., ethnic minorities; women in fields that attract mostly men, or men in fields that attract mostly women; and persons who are first-generation college attendees).

- Individuals who are enrolled in a research-based Ph.D. program in one of the following fields: African and African American Studies, American Studies, Anthropology, Art, Art History, Asian Studies, Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Classics, Dance, Drama, Economics, English, Environmental Studies, History, Humanities, International Studies, Legal Studies, Mathematics, Modern Languages and Literature, Music, Neuroscience, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Public Policy, Psychology, Religious Studies, Scientific Computing, Sociology, and Women's and Gender Studies.

- Individuals who aspire to a teaching and research career.

- Persons who have not yet earned a doctoral degree at any time and in any field.

Please send a letter of application, vita, and three letters of references (including one from the dissertation advisor) to the Office of the Associate Provost, Kenyon College, Gambier, OH 43022.

The Search Committee will begin consideration of the dossiers on January 3, 2005. Kenyon College is an Equal Opportunity Employer and, in particular, encourages the applications of women and minority candidates.

This award is named in honor of the late Marilyn Yarbrough, Kenyon parent and trustee. A legal scholar and university administrator who was a former editor of the Black Law Journal and a member of the Pulitzer Prize Board, Marilyn Yarbrough often addressed gender and racial discrimination in her scholarship and teaching.


August 2004M.I.T. Makes Yale Provost First Woman to Be Its Chief

From NY Times:

M.I.T. Makes Yale Provost First Woman to Be Its Chief

August 27, 2004
By KATIE ZEZIMA

Susan Hockfield, a 53-year-old neuroscientist, is the first woman and the first person from the life sciences to achieve the presidency.

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/27/education/27mit.html?ex=1094627341&ei=1&en=066d33a50a51a06f


Higher Education Recruitment Consortium Helps Dual-Career Couples

Eighteen universities in Northern California have banded together to start a web site that helps dual-career couples find academic jobs in the same area. The service is called the Higher Education Recruitment Consortium. The 18 university members pay an annual fee to maintain the website, which lists all job openings for professors, administrators, and staff members. The consortium includes the Universities of California at Berkeley and at Davis, as well as Stanford University and the Foothill-DeAnza Community College District. Job seekers have free access to the site, which has advertised 13,000 jobs since it was launched in October 2003.

Details at http://www.bayareaherc.org/ikorb.php



Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

The Sloan Foundation is seeking nominations for Sloan Industry Studies Fellowships. These Fellowships provide support and recognition to junior faculty from a variety of academic disciplines who are conducting field-based research on a topic important to a specific industry. Candidates must hold a Ph.D. or equivalent in economics, management or engineering, or in a related or interdisciplinary field, and must be members of the regular faculty of a college or university in the U.S. or Canada. Candidates also must be nominated by a senior scholar. Nominations are due Oct. 15, 2004. More information is available at: http://www.sloan.org/programs/fellow_announ.shtml


Women's Studies Quarterly (WSQ)

Call for Papers: Gender & Culture in the 1950s

For the December 2005 issue of WSQ, to be guest edited by Deborah Nelson (contact info below), please see the following call for papers:

WSQ is now seeking material for its December 2005 special issue on gender and culture in the 1950s. This decade and its domestic ideologies have long been of particular interest to feminists. We would like to revisit the 1950s, understanding that its very familiarity may now constitute a source of misrecognition. We would therefore like this issue of WSQ to have a double focus. On the one hand, familiar events and phenomena of the period -- McCarthyism, the execution of the Rosenbergs, Brown vs. the Board of Education, the civil rights movement, Bebop, rock and roll, consumerism, corporate culture, the Beats, women's magazines, the Cold War, the suburbs, television, to name just a few -- continue to yield important insights. We are interested in revisiting and reexamining these and other well-known landmarks and, in particular, drawing out their residues in and parallels with the present.

On the other hand, those events and archives that have yet to acquire visibility need to be integrated into our understanding of the period. Some of these areas (a suggestive rather than exhaustive list) include the
post-internment experience of Japanese Americans, particularly women; the international and transnational 1950s, with special interest in South America, South and East Asia, Africa, and central Europe; US regional culture; domestic and international migrations; fine arts and performing arts; religion; gay/lesbian/queer culture; ex-patriot and exile communities; Taiwan and post-revolution China; literature and cultural/intellectual exchange.

Submissions to this special issue will be reviewed with the understanding that the materials have not been submitted to another journal. All submissions should be double-spaced and conform to MLA citation style. Articles should not exceed 20 pages (7,000 words) in length, excluding references. Essays, short stories, and strategies for teaching (with syllabi) should not exceed 15 pages (5,250 words). Please send a disk and three hard copies of submissions along with a full mailing address, daytime telephone number, and an e-mail address to Professor Deborah Nelson, Department of English, University of Chicago, 1050 East 59th Street, Chicago, IL 60657 Queries should be sent to Deborah Nelson at dnelson@uchicago.edu

The deadline for submission is October 1, 2004.


INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDIES on Science, Technology and Society (IAS-STS), Graz - Austria

FELLOWSHIP PROGRAMME
2005-2006


The IAS-STS in Graz, Austria, promotes the interdisciplinary investigation of the links and interactions between science, technology and society as well as research on the development and implementation of socially and environmentally sound technologies. For this the IAS-STS invites researchers to apply for a stay between 1 October 2005 and 30 June 2006 as Fellows (up to nine months) or as Visiting Scholars (up to one month)

We also encourage senior scientists - working within the framework of the issues listed below - to apply as Guest Lecturers.

The IAS-STS offers excellent research infrastructure. Close co- operation with researchers at the IFZ (Inter-University Research Centre for Technology, Work and Culture; see: www.ifz.tugraz.at), guest lectures, workshops and conferences provide an atmosphere of creativity and scholarly discussion.

Furthermore we can offer five grants (EUR 1,000 per month) for long term Fellows (nine months) at the IAS-STS in Graz starting 1 October 2005, ending 30 June 2006.

The fellowship programme 2005-2006 is dedicated to projects investigating the following issues:

1. Gender ­ Technology ­ Environment
Women with their various interests, competencies and potentials play an important part in the process of shaping socially sound and environmentally friendly sustainable technologies ­ be it as users and consumers, or as experts. Applications should focus on research in the field of women in traditionally male fields of engineering, on ways of creating cultures of success for women engineers (students, graduates), and on masculinity and the culture of engineering.

2. Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Human Genetics and Biotechnology
A main focus of the fellowship programme lies on research projects providing a better understanding of human genetics or biotechnology in the context of fabrication, application and regulation. Researchers investigating socio-cultural aspects of genetic testing or risk issues in biotechnology are especially encouraged to apply.

3. Technology Studies and Sustainability
Fellowships will be awarded for research projects contributing to the issue of sustainable development from the perspective of social studies or the history of science and technology. Projects should aim at socio- economic aspects of environmental technologies or at strategies of environmental technology policy, such as user participation, strategic niche management or ecological product policy. We encourage both theoretical analysis and practically oriented case studies.

Applications must be submitted to the IAS-STS together with a research proposal by 15 January 2005.

Prof. Arno Bamme, Director of the IAS-STS, decides on the awarding of fellowships and grants in consultation with the Scientific Advisory Board.

For application forms and further information:
Please visit our website: www.sts.tugraz.at
Institute for Advanced Studies on Science, Technology and Society (IAS-STS)
Attn. Guenter Getzinger
Kopernikusgasse 9
8010 Graz ­ Austria
E-mail: info@sts.tugraz.at


July 20043rd Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities

Call for Papers/Abstracts/Submissions

January 13 - 16, 2005
Sheraton Waikiki Hotel
Honolulu Hawaii, USA

Submission Deadline: August 31, 2004

Sponsored by:
East West Council for Education
Center of Asian Pacific Studies of Peking University

Web address: http://www.hichumanities.org
Email address: humanities@hichumanities.org

The 3rd Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities will be held from January 13 (Thursday) to January 16 (Sunday), 2005 at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel in Honolulu, Hawaii. The conference will provide many opportunities for academicians and professionals from the arts and humanities related fields to interact with members inside and outside their own particular disciplines. Cross-disciplinary submissions with other fields are welcome.

Topic Areas (All Areas of Arts and Humanities are Invited):

*American Studies
*Archeology
*Architecture
*Art
*Art History
*Dance
*English
*Ethnic Studies
*Film
*History
*Landscape Architecture
*Languages
*Literature
*Linguistics
*Music
*Performing Arts
*Philosophy
*Religion
*Second Language Studies
*Speech/Communication
*Theatre
*Visual Arts
*Other Areas of Arts and Humanities
*Cross-disciplinary areas of the above related to each other or other areas.

The Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities encourages the following types of papers/abstracts/submissions for any of the listed areas:

*Research Papers - Completed papers.
*Abstracts - Abstracts of completed or proposed research.
*Student Papers - Research by students.
*Work-in-Progress Reports or Proposals for future projects.
*Reports on issues related to teaching.

For more information about submissions see:
http://www.hichumanities.org/cfp_artshumanities.htm

Format of Presentations:

*Paper sessions will have three to four papers presented in each 90 minute session, giving each presenter 20 ­ 30 minutes.
*Workshop presentations will be given a full 90 minute session.
*Panel sessions will provide an opportunity for three or more presenters to speak in a more open and conversational setting with conference attendees. Submissions for these 90 minute sessions should include the name, department, affiliation, and email address of each panelist in addition to a description of the presentation and the title page.
*Poster sessions will last 90 minutes and consist of a large number of presenters. Poster sessions allow attendees to speak with the presenters on a one-to-one basis.
*Performances will be accommodated whenever possible. Direct specific inquires to humanities@hichumanities.org

Submitting a Proposal:

1. Create a title page for your submission. The title page should include:

a. title of the submission
b. topic area of the submission (chooses from above list)
c. presentation format (choose from above list)
d. name(s) of the author(s)
e. department(s) and affiliation(s)
f. mailing address(es)
g. e-mail address(es)
h. phone number(s)
i. fax number(s)
j. corresponding author if different than lead author

2. Email your abstract and/or paper, along with a title page, to humanities@hichumanities.org. Receipt of submissions will be acknowledged via email within 48 hours.

If you do not wish to email your submission, you may send it via regular mail or fax to:

Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities
P.O. Box 75036
Honolulu, HI, 96836, USA

808-947-2420 (Fax)

***If submitting via regular mail, please supply two copies of your submission***

There is a limit of two contributed submissions per lead author.

3. Submissions will only be published in the conference proceedings if at least one of the authors registers and attends the conference. More information will be provided upon acceptance.

4. If you wish to be a session chair, please e-mail your request to humanities@hichumanities.org and indicate the topic area in which you are interested. Registration for the conference is required to be a session chair.


The Fulbright Scholar Program Council for International Exchange of Scholars

The August 1 deadline for Fulbright Scholar Program grants in the traditional program is approaching. You can find information on the 2005-06 grants available, eligibility requirements, and complete application materials at: www.cies.org. Also, the new online application is now available for use. You can also request materials by emailing apprequest@cies.iie.org.


Call for Papers

"Black Faculty in the Ivy League: Where Do We Go From Here?"

October 22-23, 2004
Columbia University - New York

In light of the 50th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education and the recent challenges to Affirmative Action, the Institute for Research in African American Studies is hosting Black Faculty in the Ivy League: Where Do We Go From Here?, an interdisciplinary conference scheduled for October 22-23, 2004.

African-Americans began to enter Ivy League Institutions in larger numbers following the social unrest of the 1960's and the assassination of Martin Luther King. This conference will not be a self-congratulatory occasion; instead it provides us the opportunity to provide reflective, critical and forward thinking analysis. Some of the issues we hope to address include, but are not limited to, the following:

* History of Blacks in the Ivy League (Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Princeton University, University of Pennsylvania, Yale University)

* How, if at all, has the growing presence of Blacks on Ivy League Campuses in the last 35 years influenced the status of black people both within and outside of the academy?

* The future of Affirmative Action

* The relationship between the Ivy League and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU)

* The relationship between Black faculty, students and alumni

* The relationship between Black faculty, administrators and staff

* The relationship with local communities (Exploring the relationship between our positions as members of the University Community and/or members of local black communities)

* The feasibility of an organized structure to address the needs and concerns of black faculty

We welcome abstracts for individual papers, panels, roundtables or workshops. Please create a title page for your submission that includes the following: title, presentation format, name of presenter(s), institutional
affiliation (if appropriate; we also welcome submissions from independent scholars), mailing address, email address, phone number and fax number.

Abstracts should be submitted by August 1, 2004.

Presenters will be notified by September 1, 2004.

Please submit abstracts to:
Mr. Russell Malbrough
Institute for Research in African American Studies
Columbia University
1200 Amsterdam Avenue, Mail Code 5512
New York, New York 10027

Or electronically to: IRAAS@columbia.edu
www.columbia.edu/cu/iraas/


June 20042004-2005 Fellowships for Threatened Scholars

Scholar Rescue Fund Fellowships

The Institute of International Education's Scholar Rescue Fund provides fellowships for scholars whose lives and work are threatened in their home countries. These fellowships permit scholars to find temporary refuge at universities and colleges anywhere in the world, enabling them to pursue their academic work and to continue to share their knowledge with students, colleagues, and the community at large. When conditions improve, these scholars will return home to help rebuild universities and societies ravaged by fear, conflict and repression.

How the Scholar Rescue Fund Works:

* Academics, researchers and independent scholars from any country, field or discipline may qualify. Preference is given to scholars with a Ph.D. or other highest degree in their field; who have been employed in scholarly activities at a university, college or other institution of higher learning during the last four years (excluding displacement or prohibition); who demonstrate superior academic accomplishment or promise; and whose selection is likely to benefit the academic community in the home and/or host country or region. Applications from female scholars and under-represented groups are strongly encouraged.

* Universities, colleges and research centers in any country may apply to serve as hosts.

* Applications and nominations should be made to the Fund's Selection Committee. Institutions interested in hosting a particular scholar should submit a letter with the scholar's application. Fellowships are awarded to institutions for support of specific individuals, to be matched in most cases by the institution or third-party. Fellowship recipients are expected to continue their work in safety at the host institution-teaching, lecturing, conducting research, writing and publishing. Fellowships from 3 months to one calendar year will be considered with up to 25 fellowships awarded annually. The maximum award is US $20,000.

* Applications are accepted at any time. Emergency applications receive urgent consideration. Non-emergency applications will be considered according to the following schedule:

Fall 2004: Applications received by September 1; decision by November 1.

Winter 2005: Applications received by January 1; decision by March 1.

Spring 2005: Applications received by April 1; decision by June 1.

How to apply:

Apply or to learn how your institution might host an SRF scholar contact:

IIE Scholar Rescue Fund Fellowships
809 U.N. Plaza, Second Floor
New York, New York 10017
Tel: (USA) 1-212-984-5472
Fax: (USA) 1-212-984-5401
E-mail: SRF@iie.org
Web: www.iie.org/SRF


May 2004National Academy of Engineering - Position Open

The National Academy of Engineering is seeking an individual to be responsible for developing and managing the provision of policy, program, and research support to CASEE. Policy support is provided by serving as staff officer for the Committee on Engineering Education (CEE). Evaluation and research support are provided by overseeing the evaluation of CASEE fellow and affiliate programs as well as coordinating the pursuit of CASEE research by fellows and affiliates.

Position requires a master's degree, research experience in the study of education for or practice within technical professions, at least three years of related professional experience, and demonstrated proficiency in conveying scientific/technical/policy information in oral and written form. Applicants must possess experience in both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Desired qualifications include a doctoral degree (in the behavioral or cognitive sciences, education, engineering, or the social sciences).

Salary for this 12-month, full-time position will be based on experience, but is not likely to start above the mid-$70's.

The formal ad is available on-line but this version lacks a lot of details. A more complete ad will eventually appear in the on-line edition of the Chronicle of Higher Education as well as be posted to the AERA job site.


March 2004Report of the Georgia Tech Promotion and Tenure ADVANCE Committee (PTAC)

Georgia Tech NSF ADVANCE Program for Institutional Transformation

Chaired by Professor David McDowell (Mechanical Engineering)

http://www.advance.gatech.edu/ptac/


The Fulbright Scholar Program for Faculty

The Fulbright Scholar Program offers faculty and professionals numerous opportunities for lecturing, research or a combination of the two during the 2005-2006 academic year in 140 countries and all regions of the world. Awards range from two months to an academic year. Grants are in 47 disciplines and several interdisciplinary fields. Also, many countries offer "All Disciplines" grants, which allow applicants to design their own award. Foreign language skills are needed in some countries, but most Fulbright lecturing assignments are in English. The application deadline for Fulbright traditional lecturing and research grants worldwide is August 1, 2004.

For information, eligibility requirements, and online application, visit our Web site at www.cies.org.



Center for Women Policy Studies positions

The Center for Women Policy Studies is seeking to fill five new positions:

* Senior Policy Associate
* Policy Associate
* Policy Assistant
* Writer/Editor
* Administrative Assistant

All positions require demonstrated expertise / experience on women's issues from multiethnic feminist perspectives. The Center offers salaries commensurate with experience, an excellent benefits package, and promotion potential.

The Senior Policy Associate, Policy Associate and Policy Assistant positions require demonstrated experience / expertise in:

*conducting policy research and analysis, including analyses of federal and state legislative and policy proposals and preparation of policy reports;

*coordinating research/policy projects, including designing and conducting surveys, focus groups, interviews, and/or impact evaluations, and analyzing data;

*analyzing academic research, policy research, program evaluations etc and preparing reports for widespread dissemination to policy makers;

*coordinating legislative briefings, conferences, seminars, and other meetings with policy makers;

*providing assistance to state legislators and their staff.

Senior Policy Associate candidates should demonstrate 7 years relevant experience; Policy Associate candidates should demonstrate at least 3 years relevant experience; Policy Assistant candidates should demonstrate 2 years relevant experience, which may include experience performing administrative support functions. A relevant graduate degree is a plus. Volunteer experience will count towards years of experience requirements.

The Administrative Assistant position requires demonstrated experience in:

*website management; database management; online communications management (listserves,bulletin boards, chat rooms, etc);

*a range of administrative support functions;

*at least 2 years relevant experience.

The Writer/Editor position requires demonstrated experience as a writer/editor:

*in a policy or advocacy organization, an association, an academic institution, a business setting, or in journalism;

*producing such products as reports for policy makers; summaries of policy research and analyses for general audiences; op eds; newsletters, etc.

*at least 5 years relevant experience;

*must provide writing samples.

Submit cover letter, resume, writing samples and other relevant materials by mail or fax to:

Human Resources
Center for Women Policy Studies
1211 Connecticut Avenue, NW Suite 312
Washington, DC 20036
202-296-8962 fax
No calls or emails, please.


January 2004WSQ issue on Women and Sports

Call for Papers

For a special issue, WSQ seeks submissions on the topic of women and sports. Essays are invited on all related topics, including those that focus on the participation of sports in the cultural processes of gender construction; women's health and well being; a woman's right to her anatomy and physical strength; social, friendship, and leadership networks; connections between sports and social class, educational opportunity, and economic markets; the role of sports institutions in manufacturing or violating sexual stereotypes; depictions or perceptions of race, ethnicity, and national origin in women's sports; sports and the beauty system; and women's use of space (freedom of movement, fields of play, institutional access).

Reflecting the connection between sports and academic institutions in the U.S., essays that explore the history of feminism (and/or women's studies) along with the development of women's athletic programs are also welcomed.

Also invited is work related to curriculum and pedagogy, such as relevant syllabi, bibliographies, or filmographies; interviews with activists/athletes; historical documents; and reviews. Creative nonfiction, poetry, and short fiction will be considered.

The deadline for submission is June 1, 2004. Essays should be no longer than 20 double-spaced pages (including notes). Book and film reviews should not exceed 750 words and include a complete citation. Please submit a disk and three hard copies to:

Carol J. Pierman
Department of Women's Studies, Box 870272
The University of Alabama
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0272

Queries should be sent to the above address or to cpierman@ws.as.ua.edu.


Energeia

The new Georgia Tech ADVANCE Magazin (2003 Report), Energeia, is available at:

http://www.advance.gatech.edu/AnnualReport.pdf


Postdoctoral positions opening

The Center for the Study of Social Stratification and Inequality, Graduate School of Arts and Letters
Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan


The Center for the Study of Social Stratification and Inequality (CSSI) invites applications from excellent scholars for postdoctoral positions. The number of the positions will be one to four depending on our budget for the next fiscal year. The center pursues development of new theories and methodologies on social stratification and inequality with emphasis on studies of rational choice theory, minorities (including gender stratification and inequality), East Asia, and fairness. Faculty members of the center are sociologists, social psychologists, cultural anthropologists, a religious anthropologist, a historian, and an economist, and they study social stratification and inequality from various viewpoints.

Applicants should hold doctoral degrees or show academic performance equivalent to holders of doctoral degrees. They should have a good command of English. Postdoctoral fellows of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science are not eligible for this application.

The successful candidates will be expected to work under the supervision of the faculty members of the center for a one-year period from April 1st, 2004. (The date is negotiable.) Though the initial contract is one-year period, the contract will be extended for one more year. The salary of a successful candidate will be 270,000 - 350,000 yen per month depending on his/her academic career. Travel and housing allowances will be paid to those who are eligible for them. Grants for excellent research projects proposed by the successful candidates will be provided. The center also academically and financially supports their presentations at international conferences.

The deadline for completed applications is January 31, 2004.

Applicants should send a curriculum vitae, a list of their presentations and publications, a research plan at the CSSI (less than 1,500 words), each copy of three major publications at most, and a letter of reference to:

Dr. Yoshimichi Sato, Director
Center for the Study of Social Stratification and Inequality
Graduate School of Arts and Letters
Tohoku University
Kawauchi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8576, Japan
Phone: +81-22-217-6036
Fax: +81-22-217-5972

http://www.sal.tohoku.ac.jp/coe/index-en.html

All inquiries concerning the application should be addressed to Yoshimichi Sato at: ysato@sal.tohoku.ac.jp


States of Insecurity and the Gendered Politics of Fear

Call for Papers

Special Issue of the National Women's Studies Association Journal (Fall 2005)

Co-editors: Dr. Carol Stabile and Dr. Carrie Rentschler
Women's Studies Program, University of Pittsburgh

Deadline for Submissions: 3 May 2004

Following the US invasion of Afghanistan and the US attack on Iraq, the concept of security has taken on a meaning distinct from previous uses. Where prior meanings of security denoted employment and social security, and general public welfare, today, the military/prison/industrial complex has hijacked the term "security" to provoke fear and anxiety among the domestic population through specifically gendered means. Official public debates about fear and global security issues often use women as a screen for militarization, and a lever for militarized action on behalf of the military/prison/industrial complex.

This special issue will look at the ways in which discourses of fear engendered by the security state dovetail with gendered ideologies of victimization. Following Cynthia Enloe's (2000) lead in her book Maneuvers, this special issue calls for a renewal of feminist theorizing and practice that directly challenges the militarization of insecurity and fear. We are interested in submissions that examine how discourses of fear and insecurity are gendered, and the ways in which feminists are responding to them. We are particularly interested in submissions that de-center September 11th and the way it stands in for "global insecurity" and fear.

Contributors might consider the following topics: global trade and trafficking in women and weapons, the international deployment of private security forces, the booming U.S. prison industry and the burgeoning numbers of imprisoned women, the ways the category of "woman" is invoked by elites to justify military violence, how victim status is unequally distributed across categories of social difference, examples of policy-making that do or do not reproduce privileged categories of victimhood, the construction of nationhood through narratives of gendered victimization, specific feminist responses to security policy, and media representations of gendered fear and insecurity, among others.

Please submit an abstract of no more than 150 words along with completed essays of no more than 30 pages in length (including notes and references). Submissions can be sent to:

Dr. Carrie Rentschler and Dr. Carol Stabile
Women's Studies Program, 2E30 WWPH
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA 15260

Send two copies of the manuscript. Inquiries can be directed to Carol Stabile at cstabile+@pitt.edu.


December 2003Michigan Feminist Studies

Seeking submissions for its 2004 issue:
Within Hostile Borders

This issue will consider how feminist work constructs a politics of location within and against global and local narratives that construct ideological, political or representational borders hostile to those living within. We welcome contributions from all disciplines.

We also invite book and film reviews related to this topic as well as visual materials which may be considered for reproduction on the cover of this volume.

Topics may include:

- feminization / femininity / the 'feminine' on the borders
- (trans)gendering borders
- productive borders: imagining communities, creating and contesting identities
- foreign nationals constructing a politics of location
- law-making on / of the borders
- borders and labor in the new world economy
- warfare and the production of (gendered) borders
- mobile territories and gendered maps
- language of the border (linguistic or generic deconstructions)
- mobility, traffic, contamination, and gender: how borders are shifted and redefined
- sexual / economic exchanges across borders
- labor, sexuality, and traffic of bodies across and between borders
- borderlands, borderlines, and hybrid territories
- historicizing borderlands: stories / histories from the edges
- militarized subjects creating and crossing borders
- (un)bounded geographies? : trade, travel, pilgrimage, warfare, colonization

Michigan Feminist Studies is an annual publication edited by graduate students at the University of Michigan. MFS particularly encourages interdisciplinary submissions, and has published papers in many disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, psychology, literature, language & linguistics, science studies, history, philosophy, art history, film, political science, and education. Graduate students, independent scholars and activists are invited to apply.

Manuscripts should be 4000-6000 words, and double-spaced. Please submit three single-sided copies, and include a 150-200 word abstract, brief biographical note, institutional and departmental affiliation, address, telephone number, and e-mail address. Papers may be submitted in the accepted format of your academic discipline (e.g., MLA, APA). If your paper is selected, you will be asked to submit an electronic file.

Mail submissions to:
Michigan Feminist Studies
1122 Lane Hall
204 South State Street
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1290

Submissions Deadline: February 20, 2004

Inquiries can be directed to: mfs.editors@umich.edu

www.umich.edu/~mfsed


November 2003K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders Awards - For Graduate Students

Due January 6, 2004

The K. Patricia Cross Future Leaders Awards make it possible for graduate students to attend the 2004 AAHE national Learning to Change Conference. Awards include travel, lodging, conference registration (up to $1,500) and a one-year AAHE membership. All award recipients are required to attend the conference. All graduate students planning a career in higher education are eligible, regardless of academic department.

Applicants should demonstrate:
(1) leadership ability or potential for exercising leadership in teaching and learning, with a strong commitment to academic and civic responsibility;
or
(2) leadership or potential leadership in the development of others as leaders, scholars, and citizens.

A faculty member or administrator must nominate the student, with a supporting letter from a second faculty member or administrator. A statement from the student indicating how he or she meets the award criteria and curriculum vita must accompany the nomination.

For more information on the awards, see
http://www.aahe.org/learningtochange/2004/scripts/htmls/cross.htm

This is the seventh year that K. Patricia Cross, a long-time higher education leader, administrator, author, researcher, and teacher, has sponsored these awards. Awardees will be announced in late January and recognized at the Learning to Change conference, which will be held April 1-4, 2004 in San Diego, California. For more information, contact Susan West Engelkemeyer at AAHE:

Email: sengelkemeyer@aahe.org
Phone: (202) 293-6440 ext. 781


Voices from the Margins: Female Exiles in 20th and 21st Century Europe

Call for Papers

In an effort to raise consciousness on marginalized women within 100 years of European history, we are seeking papers on female exiles in 20th and 21st Century Europe. The accepted papers will be published in a book co-edited by Maureen Tobin Stanley in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures at the University of Minnesota Duluth. The volume will encompass the following variations on the topic:

Immigration, Ethnic Diversity, Asylum, Transcience, Displacement, Migration Experiences, Persecution, War, Violence

We encourage submissions from scholars in literature, film, cultural studies, history, the social sciences, and women's studies.

Please submit a 500-word abstract (in duplicate) and selected bibliography by January 15, 2004. Following the selection process, manuscripts will be requested and reviewed. The manuscripts, written in English, are limited to 20 pages and will be due May 21, 2004.

Contact:

Maureen Tobin Stanley
mtobinst@d.umn.edu

Gesa Zinn
g.zinn@d.umn.edu

Dept. of Foreign Languages and Literatures
University of Minnesota Duluth
10 University Drive
Duluth, MN 55812


October 2003Postdoctoral Fellowship Program - University of California

The University of California is pleased to announce the annual competition of the President's Postdoctoral Fellowship Program for the academic year 2004-2005. The President's Postdoctoral Fellowship Program offers postdoctoral research fellowships to scholars committed to university careers in research, teaching, and service that will enhance the diversity of the academic community at the University of California. Fellowships are awarded for research conducted under faculty sponsorship on any one of the University of California nine campuses. The program offers postdoctoral fellowships to qualified persons who intend to pursue academic careers and is designed to enhance their prospects for appointments to faculty positions at the University of California. In addition to financial support, the fellowships include mentorship guidance in areas critical to success in an academic career, such as research and writing. Application forms are available for downloading from the web site at http://www.ucop.edu/acadadv/ppfp/applic-2004-2005.pdf. The deadline for submitting applications is November 15, 2003.

Information can also be obtained at:

The President's Postdoctoral Fellowship Program
University of California - Office of the President
1111 Franklin Street, 11th Floor
Oakland, CA 94607-5200
(510) 987-9503


GT Faculty Experts Guide

GT maintains a "Georgia Tech Experts Guide" on-line at http://www.gatech.edu/news-room/experts-guide/index.php

The Guide is made available to media who may want expert sources for articles in print or for broadcast - and if called, a faculty member may decide whether to be interviewed.

Take a look at the Guide -- and if you are not listed in your area(s) of expertise, and would like to be listed, send your area, name, School, phone, and email address to: larry.bowie@icpa.gatech.edu.


September 2003The Center for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California, San Diego

Visiting Research Fellowships
Academic Year, 2004-2005


CCIS will offer a limited number of Visiting Research Fellowships at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels for the 2004-05 academic year.  These awards are to support advanced research and writing on any aspect of international migration and refugee flows, in any of the social sciences, history, law, and comparative literature. CCIS fellowships must be held in residence at UCSD.  They cannot be used to support fieldwork or other primary data collection. Visiting Research Fellows will have the opportunity to present their research at CCIS research seminars and participate in writer's and academic professionalization workshops.

Predoctoral applicants are expected to finish writing their dissertations during their fellowship.  Recent postdoctoral applicants can request support to turn a dissertation into a publishable manuscript or to prepare shorter publications based on the dissertation project.  More senior scholars can propose any major research or writing project.  The duration of the fellowship is usually for 10 months, although shorter stays will also be allowed.  No summer-only fellowships will be awarded.  For the current academic year, stipends are $2,250 per month for predoctoral fellows and $3,000 - $4,000 per month for recent postdoctoral fellows (Ph.D. received within the last 6 years) depending on seniority.  Stipends for more senior scholars are negotiable.  CCIS fellowships may be supplemented with compensation from other fellowships, research grants, sabbatical leaves, or other sources.  CCIS fellows may be requested to teach a one-quarter (10 week) course in a UCSD department.

Application forms and guidelines can be downloaded from the CCIS website at http://www.ccis-ucsd.org. All application materials must be submitted no later than January 15, 2004 for fellowships to be held during the 2004-05 academic year. Candidates will be evaluated by a committee of CCIS faculty research associates and academic staff members.  Final decisions will be made by early March.

Scholars whose work deals with Mexican migration to the United States can apply jointly to CCIS and the Center for U.S. Mexican Studies (application forms and guidelines can be downloaded from their website at http://www.usmex.ucsd.edu.

Individuals with their own extramural funding may apply to become CCIS "Guest Scholars."  The application form is the same as for a Visiting Research Fellowship.

If you have any questions about the Visiting Research Fellows Program, please contact Gaku Tsuda, Associate Director of CCIS.
E-mail: ttsuda@ucsd.edu.  
Tel. # (858) 822-0526.


August 2003Transformations: The Journal of Inclusive Scholarship and Pedagogy

Call for Review Essays

The editors of Transformations are seeking review essays (books, film, video, performance, art, music, etc.) for our spring 2004 issue. Review essays should examine resources for teaching a specific subject. The author should describe the various resources (books, film, video, performance, art, music) and offer a rationale for the usefulness and application of the resources. The review may focus on one medium (e.g., movies) or several (e.g., movies, websites, novels, and paintings).

Send submissions (3,000 - 8,000 words) and inquiries to: Jacqueline Ellis and Edvige Giunta, Editors, transformations@njcu.edu. For submission guidelines contact the editors at transformations@njcu.edu.

Transformations explores and promotes inclusive pedagogy and curriculum transformation.  Representing a variety of cross-disciplinary interests, both theoretical and practical, the journal is designed to create a dynamic exchange among diverse scholars.  A variety of approaches, everything from theoretical essays to short descriptions of pedagogical innovations, will assist teachers and scholars at all levels who are committed to integrating recent scholarship on gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and other identity positions.


Racial and Gender Equity Project

Job Description: Re-affirming Action Research Project Director

Reporting to the Co-Principal Investigators of the Reaffirming Action Research Project on racial and gender equity in higher education. Responsible for the implementation of the goals and objectives of the Ford Foundation-funded program to identify ground-breaking model programs and faculty leadership in these areas. Responsible for overall administration of the day-to-day operations of the program, including designing the research model, working with diverse constituencies, gathering and analyzing data, coordinating research reports, and organizing and conducting workshops. Full project description available on the Institute for Women's Leadership website: http://iwl.rutgers.edu.

Requires a master's degree, PhD preferred, or 5 to 6 years equivalent experience in qualitative and quantitative research design in social sciences, humanities, higher education administration, public policy, women's studies, African studies, or Puerto Rican studies. Must have experience providing leadership in innovative projects, excellent communication and interpersonal skills, and the ability to understand diversity issues and the process of institutional change. Knowledge of diversity issues and challenges in higher education is highly desirable as well as experience in writing and editing for publication.

Salary Range: $45,745 - $62,835 plus comprehensive benefit package.

Send Resumes to:

Lisa Hetfield, Associate Director
Institute for Women's Leadership
162 Ryders Lane
New Brunswick, NJ 08901


June 2003Gender and Teaching

Here are interesting -and useful- links on Gender and Teaching:

--on gender and teaching, including evaluation biases:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/~twilliam/teaching/genderteaching.htm

--a terrific bibliography on gender and student evaluations, compiled by the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching at the University of Michigan:

http://newmedia.colorado.edu/~socwomen/evalgender.htm


Dissertation Writing Fellowships

Centre for European Social Research
University of Mannheim, Germany

The Centre for European Social Research (MZES) at the University of Mannheim, Germany, offers the opportunity for two sociologists or political scientists to write their
dissertations in the context of a stimulating and challenging environment provided by an internationally oriented social science research institute specializing in research on Europe.

The dissertation should fit within the framework of the ongoing research program of the MZES, though the specific topic is of course open to the candidates. Working languages at the Centre are German and English.

The institute provides stipends to highly qualified and motivated doctoral candidates. The stipends cover costs of living for single persons at a student level in the Mannheim
area. When granted, the stipend is for a span of two years. Successful candidates will be provided with space to work at MZES, and the extensive research resources of the institute
stand at their disposal.

Applications, including C.V., transcripts, list of publications (where relevant), and a sketch of the proposed work to be undertaken (no more than 5 pages long) should be submitted by
July 11, 2003 to:

Prof. Dr. Walter Muller
Director, MZES
University Mannheim
D-68131 Mannheim
Germany

More complete information about MZES and its research areas may be found at:
http://www.mzes.uni-mannheim.de


Post Doctoral Position in Qualitative Research Methods

The Department of Educational Psychology, The University of Georgia, invites applications for a one-year post-doctoral teaching position to begin August, 2003. We are looking for candidates with an earned doctorate in an education-related field that included an emphasis in qualitative research methods and the completion of a qualitative dissertation. Strong knowledge of theoretical perspectives as applied to social science research is essential. Instructional responsibilities will include teaching six sections of doctoral level qualitative research courses (ERSH 7400 Qualitative Research Traditions and ERSH 8410 Qualitative Research Design) for the academic year. See website for details on program and courses
<www.coe.uga.edu/edpsych/qualinquiry.html>.

We encourage collaboration with the qualitative faculty on programmatic projects as interested. The faculty in the program will provide mentoring in teaching, research, and writing for publication. Submit letter of application, vita, a description of teaching and research interests, and at least three letters of reference.  Salary for academic year is $36,000.  Send packet to: Kathleen deMarrais, Department of Educational Psychology, 629 Aderhold Hall, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7143, kathleen@coe.uga.edu.  All applications received by July 10, 2003 are assured full consideration.


AAAS Travel Grants:
Women in International Scientific Collaboration


The American Association for the Advancement of Science
International Office is pleased to announce the second round of competition in 2003 for Woman in International Scientific Collaboration (WISC) travel grants. The next deadline is July 15, 2003. Please find more information at http://www.aaas.org/international/wisc/


2004 Conference of Europeanists Call for Papers

"Europe and the World: Integration, Interdependence, Exceptionalism?"
March 12-14, 2004
Chicago
The Council for European Studies announces a call for papers for its 14th International Conference of Europeanists, to be held in Chicago, March 12-14, 2004. Since its first conference in 1979, the Council has brought together American and European scholars in the social sciences and humanities to foster scholarly exchange and collaboration. The Council strongly encourages interdisciplinary and trans-Atlantic panels that promote dialogue within the academy and policy communities, including Western and Eastern Europe. Participation by graduate students is welcome.
Proposals from all fields of study are invited, and the program committee especially welcomes proposals on the following themes:
    * Reckoning with the European Past: Empires, the Cold War and Human Rights
    * Europeanization: Prospects, Opportunities, Challenges
    * European Cities, European Regions
    * New Party Politics: East and West, North and South
    * Constitutions, Governance, and Citizenship
    * Traveling, Trafficking, and Transnational Regulation
    * Transformations in Work, Welfare, and Family: New Risks, New Politics
The program committee will consider panel and individual paper submissions. Please note that the acceptance rate for submissions of complete panels (with three or four papers or roundtable participants, a chair and one or two discussants) has been higher than for individual papers in the past, and we strongly encourage scholars working on similar topics to propose panels. The Council also encourages those who would be interested in serving as discussants or panel chairs to submit their names and areas of expertise.
Please note participants are limited to two presentations on the conference program and individual scheduling requests cannot be assured. A limited number of subsidies may be available for scholars travelling from Europe and for graduate students, pending funding. These subsidies consist of reimbursement for scholars traveling from Europe of three nights at the basic conference hotel room rate and two nights for graduate students.
Questions can be addressed to John K. Glenn, Executive Director, at

jkg14@columbia.edu

or to the members of the program committee:

John Stephens (political science, UNC-Chapel Hill,
chair), James Cronin (history, Boston College), Adrian Favell (sociology, UCLA), Anna Grzymala Busse (political science, Yale), Barbara Hobson (sociology, University of Stockholm), Suzanne Marchand (history, Louisiana State University), Jane Schneider (anthropology, CUNY), Jonathan Zeitlin (sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison).

The deadline for receipt of submissions is October 15, 2003. All submissions must be accompanied by the 2004 Conference cover sheet available on the Councils website,
www.europanet.org, include eight copies of all materials, and be submitted by regular postal mail to:
Program Committee 2004
Council for European Studies
420 West 118th Street, Mailcode 3310
New York, NY 10027
Email and fax submissions will not be accepted. All participants will be notified by December 1, 2003.


May 2003Year-Long Colloquium
Imagining Nature: Technologies of the Literal and the Scientific Revolution


A year-long colloquium directed by James J. Bono, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

Description: Conventionally, the emergence of modernity and the rise of modern science in the seventeenth century have been underwritten by the turn from the symbolic to the literal. Whether favoring a simple, unadorned descriptive language or insisting upon the concrete visual representation of natural phenomena, the "sciences" and medicine sought to reproduce and exhaustively catalogue the literal in nature as a foundation for the production of knowledge. This colloquium will interrogate the status of the literal through a careful historical examination of all kinds of technologies that were adopted-or adapted-to produce the literal as an object of knowledge and cultural authority. Among the technologies that we may explore are: reading (books and the Book of Nature); visual technologies and the function of images; mapping, diagramming, and modeling; the production of tables, lists, and other methods of storing, organizing, and retrieving (literal) information; mathematical representation; laboratory practices; instruments as technologies for accessing, documenting, and producing specific and precise realms of the literal; the use of museums, cabinets of curiosities, and natural history to construct "objects" as literal constituents of a natural world; classification techniques; and botanical gardens. Projects from a wide range of disciplines are welcome, including those in the fields of history, philosophy, history of science, literature, art history, and cultural studies. Discussions will be organized around the work-in-progress of participants, which will be circulated prior to each meeting along with selected additional readings.

Director: James J. Bono is Associate Professor in the Departments of History and of Medicine at the University at Buffalo,The State University of New York. He is an editor of the journal Configurations and is the author of, among other works, The Word of God and the Languages of Man: Interpreting Nature in Early Modern Science and Medicine, Vol. 1, Ficino to Descartes (1995); volume 2 is in progress.

Schedule: One Friday each month, 3:30 - 5:30 p.m.:
19 September; 17 October; 14 November; 12 December 2003; 30 January; 27 February; 26 March; 23 April 2004.

Application Deadline: 2 June 2003 for admission and grants-in-aid (only Folger Institute affiliates are eligible for grants-in-aid); 2 September 2003 for admission only.

Further Information: Please contact institute@folger.edu with any questions. Visit www.folger.edu/institute for application forms and guidelines.


Berkeley Center for Working Families(1998-2002)

View the Archival Web site and Collection of Full-text Working Papers

The web site includes:
> A list of all researchers (faculty, visiting scholars, post-docs, graduate students) affiliated with the Center during its years of operation; publications (books and special journal issues published or underway; journal articles, book chapters; and outreach activities)

> A summary of the Center's contributions to knowledge, focused on three themes: theories of and research on care; research on the social organization of time; cross-disciplinary research on childhoods.

>Full-text Working and Occasional Papers. Approximately 60 full-text papers are available in PDF format for viewing and downloading.


To access the Berkeley Web site:

1) Go directly to the Berkeley Web site at its new URL:
http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/wfnetwork/berkeley/index.html

2) Go to Network web site:
http://www.bc.edu/wfnetwork

Click on "Work and Family Links"
Look under "Alfred P. Sloan Working Families Centers"
Click on Berkeley Center
>Full-text Working and Occasional Papers. Approximately 60 full-text papers are available in PDF format for viewing and downloading.


The Berkeley Collection of Working Papers

The full-text working and occasional papers may also be accessed in the Sloan Network's "Library of Reports, Papers, and Presentations." The collection is indexed alphabetically by author for easy access, or you may scroll through the list.
http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/wfnetwork/loppr/index.html


March 2003The Hunter College Gender Equity Project

is actively seeking a post-doctoral fellow. Please see downloadable Word document:

GEP_postdoc_Mar_031.doc


Center for Women Policy Studies positions

test


Equal Rites, Unequal Outcomes:
Women in American Research Universities


edited by Lilli S. Hornig
The Committee for the Equality of Women at Harvard New York:  Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 2003.
Sponsored by grants from the Ford Foundation, the Sloan
Foundation, and the Albert Gordon Foundation

The focus is on women faculty in research universities, seeking to identify and disseminate innovative approaches to increasing faculty positions and opportunities for women. Faculty positions in these institutions are essential to establishing productive scholarly careers, especially so in the natural sciences, but also in the social sciences and humanities.

CONTENTS AND CONTRIBUTORS
Introduction: L.S. Hornig.

Part I
1. Dreaming and Scheming: Moving Towards Our University; C.R. Stimpson.
2. The Current Status of Women in Research Universities; L.S. Hornig.
3. A National Profile of Academic Women in Research Universities; H.S. Astin, C.M. Cress.

Part II
4. Gender, Faculty, and Doctoral Education in Science and Engineering; M.F. Fox.
5. You've Come a Long Way: Data on Women Doctoral Scientists and Engineers in Research Universities; C.V. Kuh.
6. The Presence and Participation of Women in Academic Science and Engineering: 1973-1995; J.S. Long.
7. Explaining Sex Differences in Publication Productivity among Postsecondary Faculty; K.A. Shauman, Y.Xie.

Part III
8. Women in the Academy: Confronting Barriers to Equality; C. Hollenshead.
9. Organizational Change to Support Success of Women: A Model and Its Lessons; L.P. Fried, et al.

Part IV
10. Primatology, Archaeology, and Human Origins: Feminist Interventions; L. Schiebinger.
11. Transforming Knowledges: Anthropology's Encounters with Feminism(s); P. Chatterjee.

Part V.
12. Women's Uneven Progress in Academia: Problems and Solutions; M.A. Ferber.
13. Work/Family/Life Issues and Programs in Higher Education What's New; K.Sullivan. Old Issues, New Solutions: Family and Work; Response to Kathleen Sullivan; R. Simpson.

Conclusions.
14. Conclusions; L.S.Hornig, B. Lazarus. Bibliography. Index.

Paperback ISBN: 0-306-47351-8 Pages: 394 pp.
/ USD 42.50 /