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  Cheryl B. Leggon
Associate Professor
School of Public Policy
cheryl.leggon@pubpolicy.gatech.edu

Ph.D., University of Chicago, Sociology
BA, Barnard College, Columbia University, Sociology
Joined faculty in 2002


Research areas/interests
Dr. Cheryl Leggon is an Associate Professor in the School of Public Policy. For her research on the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, and career pathways in science and engineering, she was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); also she was elected to Sigma Xi.

Recently, she was appointed to the S&E Human Resources Expert Panel (HREP) of the National Science Foundation’s National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES). She is working on a book, Foundations of US Public Policy: A Sociological Perspective; and, with colleagues from South Africa and South Korea, on a study of effective and promising policies that promote women's participation in science and engineering. She earned her PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago, and her bachelor’s degree in Sociology from Barnard College, Columbia University.


Honors  
In 2007, Dr. Leggon was elected as a fellow to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for her work on the intersection of race, ethnicity and gender, and career pathways in science and engineering.


Current and recent projects  
Currently, she is co- principal investigator (with Gilda Barabino) on an ADVANCE Leadership Grant, “Cross – Disciplinary Initiatives for Minority Women Faculty.”


Recent and selected publications  
Her most recent publications include:

• “Women in Engineering: The Illusion of Inclusion.” 60th Anniversary Volume, Society of Women in Engineering (in press).

• “Diversifying Science and Engineering Faculties: Intersections of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender.” American Behavioral Scientist: March, Volume 53, No. 7: 1013-1028 (2010);

• with Willie Pearson, Jr., “Assessing Programs to Improve Minority Participation in STEM: What We Know and What We Need to Know,” in Doctoral Education and Faculty of the Future, edited by Ronald Ehrenberg, Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, (2010).

• “Women in Science: Racial and Ethnic Differences and the Differences They Make,” Journal of Technology Transfer 32 (2006);

• “Gender, Race/Ethnicity and the Digital Divide,” in Women, Gender and Technology, edited by Mary Frank Fox, Deborah G. Johnson, and Sue V. Rosser, Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2006;