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  Narin Hassan
Associate Professor
School of Literature, Media, and Communication
narin.hassan@lmc.gatech.edu

Ph.D., University of Rochester, Department of English, Graduate Certificate in Gender and Women’s Studies, Susan B. Anthony Institute
Joined faculty in 2003


Research areas/interests
Victorian literature and culture, Colonial and Postcolonial studies, Feminist theory and women’s studies, History of medicine.


Honors  
Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender and Women’s Studies Dissertation fellowship (University of Rochester)

Higher Education Opportunity Program (HEOP) award for Excellence in Teaching (University of Rochester)

Mayer Fellowship, Huntington library, San Marino, CA, Summer 2007

Foundation for Women in Medicine Fellowship, Center for the History of Medicine and the Archives for Women in Medicine, Countway Library, Harvard University, Summer 2010

Ivan Allen College ISERF grants (2007, 2008, 2010)

Georgia Tech PURA grants (2007, 2008, 2009)


Current and recent projects  
Book project:
“Diagnosing Empire: Women, Medical Knowledge and Colonial Mobility” (July 2011, Ashgate Publishing)
http://www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781409426110
This book examines the figure of the woman doctor in Victorian culture and her relationship to empire through the analysis of nineteenth century travel narratives, fiction, medical guides, and historical documents. It traces both amateur and professional “doctoring” by British women travelers in colonial India and the Middle East to examine how their exchanges with natives were shaped through medical knowledge and with the material objects (medical “toolkits,” tinctures, and health guides) that accompanied their journeys. Contributing to recent discussions of the relevance of gender to colonial domesticity, the manuscript examines how the act of travel allowed women to invent and cultivate doctoring roles through their access to native domestic spaces and, in turn, participate in both medical and literary culture. By revealing the openness of a colonial field of medicine, women travelers supported medical education for women within Britain and in the colonies of India and the Middle East. Women exchanged medical ideas and practices and were figures of cultural exchange themselves. Through their privileged contact with domestic spaces inaccessible to their male counterparts, women travelers gained authority as explorers—they employed emerging discourses of health and medicine within their narratives and in their interactions with native subjects, at the same time as their experiences impacted emerging feminist movements both at home and abroad.

Edited journal collection:
“Nineteenth-Century Mobilities,” Special Issue of Nineteenth Century Contexts, Taylor and Francis, December 2015 (co-edited with Nicole Lobdell).


New Projects:
Other works in progress include a book length project tentatively titled, “Troubling Natures: Nation, Landscape and the Nineteenth Century Sensational Body” which examines gender, botanical culture and the representation of gardens and conservatories in Victorian literature and visual culture and new research on the figure of the wet nurse and infant feeding in nineteenth century and contemporary culture.

New research includes examining historical and contemporary global exchanges of yoga and its immersion within Western physical culture and spiritual practice.


Recent and selected publications  
"'A perfect world of wonders': Marianne North and the pleasures and pursuits of botany" a book chapter in "Strange Science: Investigating the Limits of Knowledge in the Victorian Age" (eds. Lara Karpenko and Shalyn Claggett), University of Michigan Press, 2017.

“Feeding Empire: Wet Nursing and Colonial Domesticity in India.” Nineteenth Century Contexts (Special Issue edited by Jill Ehnenn). December 2016.

"Colonialism and Gender" invited entry for The Gender and Sexuality Reader (ed. Nancy Naples), Wiley Blackwell, forthcoming.

"India and Literature," invited entry for The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Victorian Literature (Dino F. Felluga, Pamela K. Gilbert, and Linda K. Hughes eds), 2015

"The Productive Pillbox: Women in the Colonial Medical Market" forthcoming in Economic Women: Essays on Desire and Dispossession in Nineteenth-Century British Culture (Jill Rappaport and Lana Dalley, eds. Ohio State University Press, 2014).

"Cultural/Historical Contexts: The Industrial Revolution, Empire, and the Novel" forthcoming in Technology and Humanity: Critical Insights (ed. Carol Colatrella, Salem Press, September 2012)

“Botanical Brews: Tea Drinking and the Exotic in Lady Audley’s Secret and Behind a Mask” (forthcoming, “Transatlantic Sensations” eds. Jennifer Phegley and John Barton, Ashgate, May 2012).

“Milk Markets; Technology, The Lactating Body and New Forms of Consumption.” Women’s Studies Quarterly, Fall 2010

“Jane Eyre’s Doubles: Colonial Progress and the Tradition of New Woman Writing in India.” Gilbert and Gubar’s The Madwoman in the Attic after Thirty Years ed. Annette Federico, University of Missouri Press, December 2009.

“Female Prescriptions: On Lucie Duff-Gordon and Isabel Burton Doctoring Empire” Nineteenth Century Gender Studies Issue 5.3 Fall 2009

Consuming Culture: Narratives of Consumption in the Long Nineteenth Century (a book collection co-edited with Tamara Silvia Wagner; Lexington Books, A division of Rowman and Littlefield, March 2007)

“The Nineteenth-Century,” Women, Science and Myth: Gender Beliefs from Antiquity to the Present (ed. Sue Rosser), Santa Barbara, CA: ABC Clio, June 2008

“Health” (co-authored with Cindy Klestinec). Women, Science and Myth: Gender Beliefs from Antiquity to the Present (ed. Sue Rosser), Santa Barbara, CA: ABC Clio June 2008

“Reading the Garden" in M.E. Braddon’s The Doctor’s Wife. Mosaic. Special Issue: The Garden (38.4) December 2005.

Works in Progress/Forthcoming:
"Feeding Empire: Wet Nursing and Colonial Domesticity in Victorian India" invited book chapter for Sites of Desire: Medicine, Race, Gender and Sexuality in Colonial India and sub-Saharan Africa (under review with Pickering and Chatto)

“Spaces Elsewhere: Sensational Romance in the Hothouses of Victorian Fiction” (recently submitted article)



Web sites
The Victorian Research Web
http://www.victorianresearch.org

The Victorian Web
http://www.victorianweb.org


Professional associations
Modern Language Association
http://www.mla.org

National Women’s Studies Association
http://www.nwsa.org

INCS Interdisciplinary Nineteenth Century Studies Association
NAVSA North American Victorian Studies Association